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17

It's hard to be certain from just the picture, but that looks like mistletoe: https://tcrcd.net/brochures/pdf/Oak_Mistletoe.pdf.


4

Give them a good soaking of water, wait for the top 2 or 3 inches of soil in the pots to dry out, and repeat. Depending on the temperature, humidity, and the soil in the pots each cycle may take anything from a few days to a couple of weeks. Frequent small amounts of water will encourage the roots to grow up to the surface, which you don't want. Keeping ...


4

Yeah looks perfectly normal. I have some little oaks too, the first leaves always start off a bit red-brownish. You will see when they unfold at normal size they become green. No worries, they will do!


3

No, you should not use the area around your tree for composting,and yes, if you do, it will harm the tree. For one thing, a compost pile needs to be minimum 3 x 3 x 3 feet square, preferaby larger, for a more efficient composting process, because this allows some heat to be built up. Clearly, having something 3 feet high all the way round your oak will ...


2

That looks like a burr oak - the "corky" bark is a marker for that species. The leaves, however, look a bit "looser" than burr oak, but that could be a local variation.


2

By the size of the sapling, this is not its first year - its root will have gone down a relatively long way, and you are right, you may well damage the roots of whatever tree is growing next to it in an attempt to take it out. It does, however, need removing - if you cannot get the roots out, you will need to cut it down to a little stump, cut into the ...


2

I would take the easy way ;cut it off and go to the garden shop and buy a white oak or ANY tree you want for the new location. Having done things like that , you don't want to try to dig out that tree. And, leafed out oaks are very difficult to keep alive under the best circumstances.


2

Best practice when removing a tree branch is (a) not to leave a stub but to cut as far as the ridge or collar where the branch meets the tree, and (b) not to bother with sealants, wound paints, etc. The best you can do is remove the stub as far as the collar and then just hope for the best. To quote from this link: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=...


2

There seems to be new bark growing where the old has come off. If the bald area extends right round the tree and there is no new bark growing underneath, the tree will not live long, but you don't mention any other visible problems with your trees so that seems unlikely. Your picture only shows half the circumference of the tree trunk, of course. If there is ...


1

We live in Whittier California. We have an oak tree in a container that is 18 years old. Have had to get much larger containers through the years. The current container weighs about 500 pounds. The oak tree is currently about 12 feet high and 10 ft wide. It is possible to do what you want to do.


1

If your oak is self-seeded it shouldn't really need staking. Try and pull a self-seeded oak seedling out of the ground and you'll see how firmly rooted they are. Staking can actually be counterproductive as trees react to wind by building a stronger trunk and root system. As for encouraging a better form, my advice is to let your tree do its own thing. If it'...


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