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11

Depends how big they are - if the ground is damp and they're no taller than, say, 6-10 inches, you should be able to pull them up. If the ground isn't damp, make sure it is when you attempt this. If they've been there longer (since last year or more) then you need to dig them out and repair the grass afterwards. If they've been there much longer and are ...


10

I had a large (massive) Elm tree that had all the roots on one side cut about 6 feet from the tree due to an idiot plumber running a sewer pipe. This was a deep trench, too. I used an in-ground water injector to pump root stimulator into the soil all around the tree base. I went around with a hose and penetrated the ground around the tree about 20 feet ...


9

It's down to the particular variety of tree or plant how to tell, but bear in mind that not all trees are either male or female (dioecious), many are monoecious, meaning they have male and female parts on the same plant. Of those that are dioecious, information at the point of sale can be helpful, because often it's very difficult or impossible to tell ...


9

It looks like an oak to me as well. It's been a long time since I've done oak identification, so I'm not going to venture a guess as to species. I will tell you that I find oaks growing in our garden frequently, and we don't have any oaks within 100 feet. My guess would be a squirrel or bird stashed the acorn in your pot for later eating.


8

Collect them, as soon as they fall. There is no need to climb a tree, as tempting as it sounds. A good acorn is fresh, rather big, feels plump and heavy, the cap comes off easily and it shows no signs of damage like holes (insects), cracks or mould. Left alone outside, the acorn will germinate in spring or, as I have observed, some rather eager quercus ...


7

I know the answer has already been accepted, but feel the need to add this - piles of leaves are best composted separately from everything else, because they break down in a different way from most other stuff. If you've got room, and plenty of black bags, it's easy - just collect them up, stuff them in the bags, as many as you can in each bag and still be ...


7

As it's such an old tree, I'd be inclined to get someone to carry out a Picus or sonic tomograph test as well - if the Resistograph results are echoed by the Picus, then you might need to do something, even if that's removing the tree above the point where it's weak. It's probably sensible to get another person to do more testing, then you get a second ...


7

I've found that trees can put up with a lot. Oak trees are seldom affected by galls unless there is a heavy infestation. Galls on the leaves are not a worry, and oak trees will tolerate them quite well. You can rake up and destroy the leaves when they fall, if they are causing aesthetic issues. Pesticides are rarely effective. The kind that can be damaging ...


7

There are only a limited number of Oaks which produce this mossy cap at the bottom of the acorn - those that do are listed below, but without leaves, it's next to impossible to be certain which it might be:- Quercus suber, maybe, the Cork Oak; Or Quercus cerris (Turkey Oak, known as European Turkey Oak in countries outside of Europe); And possibly Quercus ...


7

It is a little hard to tell for sure from the single photo (if you could pick a specimen & post more detailed photos including the underside & provide a description of the texture, it would help), but it looks to be what is commonly called a Wood Ear Fungus. There are a couple species I am aware of that are commonly referred to as Wood Ear, & I'...


6

I used to suffer from this when the squirrels buried acorns in my lawn. I found that just mowing them down regularly (with routine lawn maintenance) kept them from becoming established.


6

It may not be possible to save the tree - if you're lucky, some parts will survive, and when you see where the dead areas are, you could have those removed. Cutting out roots like that means you've effectively interfered with the tree's means of survival - you can remove branches at the right time without ill effect, but removing roots, particularly if they ...


6

Add nitrogen. I doubt acidity is the root problem here, though you could add lime if you wanted to. You have a lot of high carbon ("brown") materials and need high-nitrogen (or green) materials to balance them. Animal manure (particularly poultry or rabbit) or fresh "green" (not always green colored) materials (lawn clippings, if you or anyone you know ...


6

Assuming that all four trees you mention really are Quercus varieties, oak leaves make the best leafmould - they break down faster and make quality leaf mould. The way to produce leafmould is to put the leaves in black plastic sacks, poke a couple of holes in the bottom, if the leaves are already wet, fine, if not, add some water, tie the tops shut and stack ...


6

Sulphur is a contact fungicide. Really there are two forms of sulphur fungicide: powder or soluble. I assume that you need only the soluble one. "Contact fungicide" mean that you can test just few parts of the plant, and you can see if there are some problems with the plant. As pnut wrote in comment, I think the interpretation is that it can damage some ...


5

If you want the sawdust to compost down, it needs to be mixed or paired with nitrogen rich, green materials at a ratio of roughly 4 to 1, so 4 parts brown (sawdust) and 1 part green (green foliage, kitchen scraps, grass clippings, that type of thing). Dead leaves break down differently from other types of compostable materials - if you have the room and the ...


5

Most likely, yes. Epicormic shoots are produced in greater numbers in Quercus palustris in particular if pruning is carried out - given your unusually low temperatures, it's likely this will have caused stress to the trees, and the epicormic shoots are a response. It's also possible that some of the topgrowth may be damaged because of the cold, again ...


5

I've been mowing them really small for about three years now and turning half into the garden and putting the other half into a compost pile along with grass clippings, kitchen scraps and of I'm lucky enough to be given some manure I mix some of it in there too.


5

Salt will not do anything to help you pave the area over. I don't recommend paving the area at all unless you are willing to excavate at least a foot deep for four to six feet around where the tree was. The reason is that there are still roots and part of the stump in the ground. These will start to decompose and shrink in volume. As this happens the ...


5

The symptoms shown in your photograph indicate bleeding canker - what I'm not sure of is whether Sudden Oak Death is an issue in your area, so far as I can tell, its a major problem in California but not where you are (yet). Sudden Oak Death is caused by infection with Phytophthera ramorum, but I'd expect some symptoms on the foliage too with that particular ...


5

Self-seeded (or squirrel-seeded) oaks are pretty tough. Unless you're maximising yield for a commercial operation you can be quite rough with them. I loosen the soil and pull them up rather than digging, so as not to damage the roots of my fruit trees/bushes (but the top few inches of my soil are mostly composted plant matter mixed with light topsoil). ...


4

I live in a forest primarily made of oak trees. I fight "leaf wars" every year. For 15 years I have mulched the majority on a very large lawn. The leathery leaf must be chopped as small as possible. It is a favorite food source for earthworms. Their castings and leaf mold help dress the soil and is fertilizer for grass and feeder roots of trees. An oak ...


4

In the fall up here in Wisconsin I pull the empty sunflower seed bags over my roses and stuff the oak leaves in around the branches for a winter insulation. Come spring I pile them together and pass the lawn mower over them collecting them in the lawn mower bag. The shredded leaves are stored in plastic garden bags to be added into the mulch bins throughout ...


4

It'a a gall of some kind, though I couldn't tell you which species; I'd guess some species of the gall wasp Andricus.


4

Oak runners can be stopped by stripping off the leaves; check them weekly and rub off any new sprouts. It takes a few months, longer for Red Oak than Live Oak. Do not cut them, because they will come back thicker. If you notice in nature you do not find many trees with sprouts. That is because deer, goats, cattle etc. eat the new sprouts. Once the sprouts ...


4

Lancelot "Capability" Brown who was born in 1716 invented this machine. Sometimes the root ball was so heavy he had labourers perch in the foliage to counter balance it while moving. You might be able to pay for the equipment by giving rides!


4

I believe these are more likely to be oak galls. This is not an issue for oaks. It is commonly found on oaks and no action is required. Even if it is the problem you describe, Taphrina, the Wikipedia links indicates that "Watering and fertilizing infected trees can help reduce stress on the tree and can reduce disease symptoms". You can never go wrong ...


4

I would say no, definitely not, even if you waited till dormancy in winter. It looks like its been in ten years or more, and by now will have an extensive root system both down into the ground and horizontally. A small crane and grab might do it, but even then, there's no guarantee the tree will survive the move. My advice is to leave it right where it is to ...


4

If the tree has been planted for over a year you do not need a stake and should remove that t-Bar. Consider the direction of the prevailing wind. If the tree is leaning away from that direction you may have a clue. Also, I notice the large branch midway up heading off in the direction of your house. Branches do not move up as the tree grows and the ...


4

I think it might be Woolly Aphid, specifically Woolly Oak Aphid, especially as you're in Florida. The only thing I'm not sure of is I can't find anything that says this particular form of woolly aphid affects the woody parts of the tree; other forms of woolly aphid do so, coating branches with layers of what looks like white fluff or fur. Whilst a bit ...


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