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In terms of commercial fertilizer, average wood ash would be about 0-1-2 or 0-1-3 (N-P-K). The major elements of wood ash include calcium (up to 30%), potassium (~3–4%), magnesium (~1–2%), manganese (0.3–1.3%), phosphorus (0.3–1.4%), and sodium (0.2–0.5%).


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"Wood ash is a source of potassium(K). But it (K) is easily washed away by water so if it has rained after the fire went out the potassium is gone." - a local gardening book in Bulgarian "Wood ash is a strong source of carbon for a compost pile. If your compost pile is mostly greens - grass, manure, kitchen scraps - adding a carbon source will ...


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I would recommend not to use ash for lemon trees. Ash may be used as fertilizer (but attention: it may be strong, so not too much, as you should not use too much of chemical [dry] fertilizers), just you may concentrate some heavy metals, so not too much also in long term (few "burned" trees for a garden, per year, may be ok, it is recycling, but ...


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Wood ash traditionally has a small amount of potassium, like a per-cent. It depends on the wood. So if mixed with compost, it will add a trace of potassium (K). I have read that potassium from wood ash was used to make soap; the difference is that for soap making, the potassium is leached (dissolved) out of a "large" amount of ash and concentrated. ...


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