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Nepenthes, or the Asian pitcher plant, naturally grows in the tropical regions of Asia either in high mountain rain forests or in warm lowland grasslands at the base of mountains. They are divided into two types, those that live above 3000 feet (highlands), and those that live below that (lowlands) with differing requirements. The Nepenthes x 'Miranda' is ...


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Nepenthes can be grown as windowsill plants as long as adequate conditions are provided. There are two main divisions for nepenthes, highland and lowland with some groups in between. Lowlanders tend to need high temperatures and very high humidity (imagine a rain forest). Highlanders need lower temperatures and usually do not require as much humidity (think ...


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Pitchers tend to die much earlier than leaves. I know this from personal experience. I've had pitchers die on leaves which last a month or more afterwards. I usually cut the pitchers off once they die (mostly because I think it looks better). On another note, you do not need a terrarium to grow nepenthes. I have a N. maxima which I have been growing as a ...


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As it's a CFL bulb, it won't be getting baked because of the low heat output. According to my houseplant book, Nepenthes likes to be constantly moist, but not waterlogged, not just slightly damp, and likes to be surrounded by humid air, so maybe using a pebble tray arrangement, half filled with water with pebbles sticking out for the pot to sit on top of ...


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Nepenthes is a rainforest plant. It expects hot, humid conditions. Most people who grow them have to use terrariums. I doubt even in Florida you have the humid rainforest-like conditions outdoors. I suspect direct sunlight will not be good either. Rainforests tend to be very shady places. You may have more luck growing Sarracenia ("Trumpet" Pitcher Plant) ...


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Your problem could be in giving it distilled water, which has a ph of 7. The pH of rain varies, especially due to its origin. On America's East Coast, rain that is derived from the Atlantic Ocean typically has a pH of 5.0-5.6; rain that comes across the continental from the west has a pH of 3.8-4.8; and local thunderstorms can have a pH as low as 2.0. ...


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I know this is an old post, but I was searching for information about this variety of Nepenthes and came across it. I don't know how your plant is doing right now, but I suspect your well water is the problem. Well water tends to be chock full of minerals and high in TDS (total dissolved solids), which Nepenthes can not tolerate. All carnivorous plants ...


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Separate the plants, if possible, so you can give different conditions to the N. Ventrata. They might benefit from the repotting. To reduce drying, try moving it to an area with less direct sunlight, if possible, and find a way to raise the humidity. You could place it under a low glass table, on a tray of wet pebbles, etc. With heat over 80 degrees, try ...


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It's "one trap per leaf", so if the dry bits bother you, just cut off the dry traps. I wouldn't cut dying traps, to give the plant the chance to retract as much as possible. Technically, the traps are part of the leaf, by the way, what we tend to see as leaf is technically just the base of the leaf. This explains why there won't be another pitcher once the ...


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The stuff in the pitcher, and the pitcher itself, are rotting. Given the color I'd say you gave it too much food. Stick with smaller flying insects, or better yet, a dilute fertilizer like Maxsea or Jack's, especially if it's going to be indoors. I use 1/4 tsp of Jack's All Purpose 20-20-20 to a gallon of distilled water, and fill the pitchers ~1/2 full (do ...


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It almost looks like TOO much light based on the photos. Also possibly an imbalance in the potting mix. I have added superthrive to watering my nepenthes and it helps (not using fertilizer ever). Also, it is possible that it is overwatered ...


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Carnivorous plants eat insects and from time to time the miscellaneous rodent, or bird, however feeding it raw meat could be detrimental to your plant. I use distilled water on my plants as even sometimes rainwater may contain chemicals etc. This depends upon the area in which you live. I have great success with distilled water and will continue to use that ...


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If the pitchers dry out it is not because it is immature but due to an imperfect environment. To improve the environment: These plants grow in a variety of habitats but you could not go wrong by increasing the humidity. Put the plant in a terrarium surrounded by sphagnum moss or other material that retains moisture. Increasing the light levels is another ...


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