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"However, I feel like the direct sunlight would lead the to cover crops decomposing more quickly because of photodegradation? Am I totally wrong about that?"- fnwovnwownf Well no, you aren't totally wrong about that. However, the microbial and macro decomposers are going to be far more effective. Decomposers like the mulch; it keeps the sun and the eyes of ...


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You may be able to have the best of both worlds when it comes to mulch. This idea works, but depends on a large extent on the size of the garden (the larger, the better). You could use wood chips as the basic mulch in the bed, but NOT around the crowns of your plants. Around them, use small rocks/pebbles. It's like putting small doughnuts into a larger ...


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Depends how much rain you get - if you live in an area where it doesn't rain often, but when it does, it rains heavily, or alternatively, it rains quite often but its more showery,both wood and bark chips aren't such a great idea compared with stone chippings because they hold onto moisture and take a while to dry out. Plants such as echeverias are shallow ...


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Yes, you can use chipped wood, but chipped bark is a better alternative to chipped wood. Chipped bark breaks down slower, less likely to rob your plants of the nitrogen they need. Certain microbes break down organic matter, they feed off the nitrogen in the soil. If your wood is breaking down fast you will have an explosion of microbe growth. This ...


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