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5

Organic mulch should not result in plant loss for any reason, unless the mulch is applied too thickly up against the crown or stem of an herbaceous plant. My experience with cocoa bean hulls is that a very young/small annual can succumb to rot if that happens; I assume that the same issue would occur with rice hulls (cocoa bean hulls go through a period of ...


5

According to the pest-control company Terminix, termites don't really feed on wood mulch but like the fact that it causes a moist environment, which they then use for cover to explore for a wood source. Terminix, because it wants to sell you their services, rather dramatically states that "Mulch doesn't necessarily attract termites, but can serve as an ...


4

That is funny “top grade mulch” as termite resistant. I say this as I have worked in the lumber and plywood industry for a few years. My plant specializes in small log recovery (old logs have more bugs) and you find termites time to time but the process usually kills them. The bark is scraped off the trees then it goes through a machine called a hammer hog ...


4

Leaves make excellent mulch; the only downside is that too many/too large leaves can smother perennials and/or cause crown rot in some species. Also, the species of tree that the leaves come from makes a difference - trees from the Populus genus (aspens, cottonwoods, poplars) tend to become leathery and not break down very easily, while those of Juglans ...


3

It's not a viable idea - the wood chips will gradually degrade and decompose over time, creating a layer of soil like material on top of the gravel just right for seeds to germinate and grow in. Not only that, assuming the gravel is not compacted into place with a machine or bound with resin, the two layers will not stay separate if there's a table and ...


1

The First step would be to get rid of the grubs (cockchafer grubs live 3-4 years in the soil). I guess you already did that by replacing the soil. I don't know about mulch, but insect nets definitely help. You can put them on your pots like a tent. For cockchafers, you only need to keep them up the month or two they are flying and probably only from late ...


1

There's no reason why you can't extend the mulch cover to within an inch or two of the trunk, assuming the mulch is something of organic origin, isn't too deep, and won't be sitting over any tree roots showing above the soil. Organic mulches (composted materials, bark chips and so on) are preferable to inorganic mulches because the latter don't improve the ...


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You can buy mulch dyes in a variety of colors. A simple google search will reveal many sources. I have no idea what's in them, but one said "environmentally safe", whatever that may mean.


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