10

Etiolation, or insufficient light strength, is a partial explanation - this tree is deciduous and normally would be dormant at this time of year. However, the process of thigmomorphogenesis is also missing. Thigmomorphogenesis refers to movement - when a plant is outside, particularly one with a tall, woody stem, it will be exposed to air movement. That air ...


9

Oh my goodness. Do you understand the treasure you have? Find a master pruner to create a covered walkway! How wonderful. If you destroy this tree I will haunt you when I am dead! (Grins). That tree should not be getting taller at all. Weeping trees are two trees grafted together; a prostrate variety of the same species grafted on top of an upright ...


7

I just got rid of a mulberry tree this year, and I'm glad I did. The fruit is so thick and dense that it covers the ground and not much else grows there. They grow fast. A branch growing 3ft a year is not unusual. They grow easily from seed. You will have seedlings every where. The juice stains cars and clothing. When it gets hot all those berries ...


7

That is etiolation. Here's a ginger plant with the same issue. Your tree wants full sun. This tree would prefer to be grown outdoors in the sun. Of course, if it's freezing out right now, I'd wait till spring when the temps don't go under 45 degrees F. or thereabouts, to actually move it. That way you won't have so much risk of shock/cold damage. Don't prune ...


7

One possibility is that you have been sold a male tree which also flowers but doesn't bear fruit. Commercial varieties sold from nurseries are typically self pollinating so you only need a single tree (although you should check the label). However, in the wild you will see male and female trees and only the female bearing fruit. UPDATE: I just thought, one ...


6

I have had several mulberry trees over the years. You can not kill them. Prune when you have the time and concentrate more on the shape you want. If you don't like the shape try again in a couple years.


6

Mulberry trees can grow roots that break up sidewalks and such. I wouldn't plant them next to a house, either. Mulberries with dark fruits may fall on the ground, people may walk on them, and if they step on carpet in the house, it can really stain the carpet (so I've read). White-fruited mulberries are probably non-staining (but I could be wrong). It ...


5

They're short lived (50-80 years), enormous, prone to leaf spot which they will spread all over the area they're in (at least they are here), and should never be planted in a back yard unless your yard is huge and can comfortably accomodate removing the tree when it's close to death - it will fall over one day. They're great for parks but terrible in the ...


5

1) According to the temperature of this moment. I have read that it can snow until April. The ideal time to prune the mulberry tree is before the spring vegetative growth but avoid the intense frost of the coldest months. 2) The mulberry tree is a plant exuberant, most of the bud is able to bear fruit. Therefore, you can operate without much thoughts. ...


5

That leaking sap & stained bark appears to be caused by bacterial wetwood, also known as slime flux. This is a common bacterial infection that creates slightly caustic sap & raises pressure within the wood. The pressure forces the sap out at weak points, staining the bark. The sap smells sort of fermented, right? That's the result of the bacteria ...


4

Prune the tree at the correct time of the year for that type of tree to avoid the stain from a leaking wound. Over several years the stain does go away as the wound heals closing the leak. It's not a sick tree, it's just healing the wound!


4

Red Mulberry (Morus rubra) can also have lobed and unlobed leaves on the same tree. Young trees tend to have more lobed leaves, and mature trees tend to have fewer.


4

White mulberry (Morus alba) could have both lobed and unlobed leaves in the same tree. I find more frequently unlobed leaves, but some plants (especially on young stages) can have mostly lobed leaves. And on my books, Morus alba is describes as usual unlobed tree.


4

I would presume that you did them outdoors and that ordinary sunlight would fine during the summer- just don't let them dry out- the problem with mulberries is they don't like to be pruned and the wood needs to be sutured and burnt to stop it bleeding afterwards, I would leave them for quite a while to allow root formation depending what it is you're growing ...


4

I suspect a language problem: Blackberries (Rubus) are “mûre” in French, “mora” in Spanish and “amora” in Portuguese. -> which may easily be confused with Morus, the Genus of mulberries. But of course some prankster may have switched the labels, who knows? In any case, your plant looks indeed like a blackberry.


3

Possible explanation 1 The rootstock is not compatible with the weeping part, so an intermediary variety is used for the plant to benefit both from the rootstock's traits and from the pendant top. It may be that the rootstock is adapted to a certain type of soil (sandy/heavy clay), is resistant to environment stress (drought/bad drainage), has a certain ...


3

Just cut regularly the bottom green part (just like the ruminants). But I would also consider to remove the entire tree. (No more, after reading Stormy answer).


2

I've just checked where you are - as you're in a northerly climate, mulberry should be planted in the sunniest, most sheltered spot available, preferably in front of a wall which faces south, which will give it optimum conditions. It may be that you've had late frosts and that's why the mulberry has been reluctant to put on growth - hopefully, you dug over ...


2

How old is it and what size is it? It is possible that it's just not large enough to flower yet. Most trees (and mulberry is generally considered a tree, although dwarf varieties are available) take at least 3-5 years to begin to flower and set fruit. If it's a small plant still and you just transplanted it last year, it would not be surprising at all if ...


2

There could be many reasons: Rain or frost during flowering. Poor soil (after 45 years the mulberry could have "eaten" much of the nutriments) Wrong pruning: old branches will not produce fruits, but also the very young (of the last year). or also diseases or chemicals (as you wrote), but I think you will have noticed that from other signs (e.g. leaves).


2

I think it's a White. The leaf margins look a bit off because they range from more saw-toothed to more rounded. The leaves with fewer lobes have sharper margins. Ime (have 4 on my land, two old, two young) they'll be >15' tall before the bark starts acquiring ridges.


2

The Taiwan mulberry probably won't do well here in the UK - it prefers temperatures to be around 23-25 deg C year round, or at least, the newer hybrid Morus atropurpurea (syn M. alba) Miaoli No. 1, bred in 2008, does. It also does not appear to be self fertile. Morus macroura, the Pakistan mulberry, is available in the UK - it will need full sun and free ...


2

Those sucker shoots can all be usable. You could top them as bush so that they will send out side shoots for berries, or cut all but one to the ground if you want it to grow as a tree. The center, dead shoot can be cut back to the ground. Mulberries need to be in the ground, and not grown in pots. They prefer their roots to spread laterally. Too much ...


2

The colour of it indicates that it still is alive. See the difference of colour at the top? It should look a little orange if it were dead. Same for the buds, which are a little green. I advise you be patient, it should sprout leaves if weather doesn't get too dry and too hot soon.


2

Yes, it will straighten out. If the trunk becomes twice as thick as now, it will still look a little bit curved (not as much as now), but nothing to worry about. It will of course never be as straight as the bamboo stick next to it, but that is not really necessary, is it?


2

Easy way: two stakes with a level line between them and a sharp hedge trimmer More work pair of pruners to cut the branches back off the ground. Cut back to a leaf node Just cut it back. Branches growing on the ground may root but will definitely kill off the grass and provide a hiding spot for small animals including skunks, rats and mice if they live ...


2

Hmm, well I'm confused and clearly, so is the nursery you bought from. Mulberries are self fertile, in other words, they do not need a partner in order for pollination to take place, each tree carries both male and female flowers. These are rather inconspicuous, and may not even be noticed if there are few of them. I don't know what part of the world you're ...


1

I suggest two approaches: 1 Umbrella look This is simple, you just cut everything below set height twice a year. 2 Pedestrian tunnel The tree in the image above is a Sophora pendula, but it doesn't matter, it is just for illustrative purposes. You could train (by staking and pruning) your mulberry to 'jump' over the sidewalk, and by doing that you would ...


1

At this stage it can be tricky to say, but based on your location, and the pic you provided, this does appear to be Morus rubra. Or, also very likely, a hybrid between M. rubra and M. alba, which are becoming extremely common in the northeast, and is helping spread the invasive Asian white mulberry (M. alba) out of control.


1

With trees of that size, grafting will not bring good results. The trees will sucker around the new scions even after they take, and it will be a constant battle to keep them under control. If the nurseryman said they came in pairs of male and female trees for pollination, I would assume that they are a monoecious species. Sexing young trees isn't always ...


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