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Based on the added photo of the plant with roots, you have a bunchgrass but not perennial ryegrass. The fact that the base of the stems are not purple shows that this is not a perennial ryegrass (that's a key marker for the species). Based on some random photos I've been looking at, I would guess that it's annual ryegrass, which explains its growth habit (it'...


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It's not unusual for grass plots to become odd mixtures of both intended and unintended species with seed blown in or spread by machinery. The root image is helpful in that it indicates no stolons or rhizomes which would narrow down the identity quite a bit. There are a number of species of coarse grass that can appear: brome, darnel, orchard grass, foxtail ...


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This is just a guess, but it's a guess you can confirm or refute by looking at your grass next time it has flowers. My guess is that the round stems are the flowering stalks. As a wind-pollinated plant, it would make sense to try to put its flowers up higher than the rest of the plant so the anthers gets more wind and the pollen travels further. I've ...


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According to The Lawn Institute (specifically, this page), cool season grasses should be mowed at anywhere from one to four inches. This includes perennial ryegrass. The growth rate you describe sounds more like annual ryegrass to me. This grass is often included in less-expensive grass seed mixes because it sprouts very quickly, providing 'instant green&...


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