Hot answers tagged

12

No, you shouldn't interfere with them or damage them in any way, you may compromise the tree if you do. If possible, remove the grass that's near the roots, plant ground cover instead or just mulch around the roots.


7

What height are you cutting your lawn? Are you cutting it when it is damp? Has it been a mild summer in your neck of the woods? If you're cutting it less than 3", it's too short. The amount that gets clipped off should be just a small fraction of the overall height. If you're cutting it when it is damp (like in the morning), it'll be prone to ...


7

Far better to mulch the area or otherwise remove it from mowing. A huge tree is a huge issue when it's in trouble, and cutting roots is very likely to cause trouble, as the tree depends on the supplies from those roots, their physical support, etc.


6

I don't have too much experience (none with robot mowers) but I think same 'rules' apply to any type of mower: Avoid mowing when grass is wet - this applies to early morning when there is dew (or after rain). Mowed wet grass is sticky and will probably pile up inside you mower. Also, the hottest time of day is not good time because your grass it trying to ...


5

I usually mow my lawn on the highest setting on my mower so there's not much I can do when it grows too high. Don't worry too much about it if it's not something you do frequently. Sometimes life or weather gets in the way. The grass will recover if it's otherwise well cared for, fed, watered and gets good sun. When you cut the grass it loses some of its ...


5

Three days. There are things to look for, like: uneven surface of blades (healthy grass growing strong again) clippings have settled shorter grass acclimating to new sunlight But in reality, those will almost always happen by day 3. So... three days.


5

Mow higher. Grass grows much slower when mowed high, so the volume of clipping generated is drastically dropped, and what is produced will fall down through the grass better. Plus, the height of the grass mirrors the root system somewhat. The longer blades support deeper roots, and your lawn will not suffer as badly from drought. I usually don't mow lower ...


5

Depends on the mower you're using - if its just an ordinary electric hover mower with a rotary blade, or a non hover with a rotor blade, you just buy a new blade when its blunt or damaged, unless you want to put it in for a service every year, when they might do it if it needs it. If you can find someone to sharpen it, or you can do it yourself, fine, but in ...


5

It depends on a lot of factors but for rotary mowers, every 20 to 25 hours is a good interval to sharpen your blades. For some people that means once a year, for others twice a year. For commercial landscapers it's once or more a week. You can also just look at the blades of grass the next day or so after mowing. If the tips have a large (1/4" or so) ragged ...


5

Before you start doing anything on your mower disconnect the spark plug wire and make sure it's away from the spark plug so the engine doesn't accidentally start if you turn the blades. Think of how old prop planes were started by turning the prop. On lawnmowers I've used and seen there spark plug has always been either on the front or back but tipping it ...


5

I'd simply mow it a few more times before freaking out and "weeding" it out. It may just be yellow now because it was taller before you mowed, so the lower parts were more shaded. Could be those patches had excess fertilizer, causing the higher growth. Mow it to the same length for a while and see if the color evens out.


4

I would not do that, shaving off the roots can really hurt or even kill the tree. I would just go around the root then come back with scissors and cut around the root. You could also use a weed wacker to get close but try not to hit the root. It will not do much to the root but it could break you string on the weed wacker. Then get were you need to go with ...


4

I'll provide some suggestions and options but you'll need to dig into them further as not having a nice grass lawn is complete anathema to me. :) A lot is going to depend on other factors like do you want the area available to walk through or to have kids or pets play on? Infrequent mowing Fine Fescues Fine fescues grow in many different types of soil and ...


4

As other's have stated, try not to mow off more than 1/3rd of the length of the blade. Most cool season grasses like to be mowed high. 2-3" is a good mowing height. The blade is where it makes it's food (photosynthesis) so if you cut too much off it goes "hungry". A lot of times when people complain about the lawn looking bad after cutting it's because ...


4

If your lawn is stressed after mowing, you may need to sharpen your blade. Or you're cutting it too short. A lot factors into how often you need to mow. It should grow enough so that when you mow, you cut ⅓ of its length, leaving 3½ inches. Regardless, I cut my grass every 2 weeks on my mower's highest setting.


4

Not normally, it's considered a "cover crop" to protect the soil, and will help more moisture stay near the surface. A few years ago we had almost no rain all summer, and living on a creek the grass was just fine, then took off when it rained. Left to right based on clipping length in a rotational grazing system:


4

Well, I hate to contradict anyone, but we've been attending manufacturers updates schools since the 70's and early eighties and I assure you, you always turn the mower towards the dipstick - always. The manufacturers went through a lot of painstaking engineering to make lawnmowers function in this regard without either, oil not draining, or gas filling up ...


4

You're in the UK - that means the grass will be wet or damp overnight throughout the year with the exception of the summer months (June to end of July), and only then if its not raining, so this would rule out letting it run during the night. Whether or not a model can operate in wet or damp conditions should be one of the features you check for prior to ...


3

IN this case, the direction to tip the mower is back...I.e. Place a cinder block on the handle to hold it down to the ground. As noted in another answer, pull the spark plug wire. Most mowers have an electric cut-off at the handle you have to hold but still always better to add extra steps of safety than it is to be sorry you didn't.


3

This happens a lot in the south of the UK - we still cut if its growing, but with the blades set high, and let the clippings fly, leaving them on the lawn, only clearing them away (if they haven't shrivelled and disappeared completely) when rain is coming or has arrived. Parts of the cricket field opposite where I live are currently brown and parched, are ...


3

Lawns allowed to go dormant do not do well. Sure, some will come back but weeds will be able to take hold. Have you TRAINED your lawn grasses to become drought tolerant? When the roots are made to grow DEEP by watering very deeply and then allowing the lawn to dry until one can see their footprints on the grass before watering deeply again is the best way ...


3

I just wanted to add that you can try to mow in a different pattern each week. So one week mow diagonally, the next horizontally. This way the dried grass from the prior week will be chopped up again.


3

If you want grass, there are several commercially available grasses that are advertized as "no mow." They are generally fine textured dwarf grasses that grow between 2 and 6 inches in height. There are also native grasses for warm areas, like Blue Grama and Buffalo Grass, that stay short. The most important thing is to find a species that does well in ...


3

I agree with 3 - 3.35 inches, but that varies depending on whether, and weather, I can mow every week. If rain interrupts the mowing and the lawn gets longer than normal, then I mow it longer to maintain the 1/3 rule; then I mow it again a few days later to bring it back to 3" or so. I say "or so" because my wife likes it shorter. I don't argue with her; I ...


3

I don't own a hover mower but looking at the design of this mower and other flymo mowers I would try to cut a a discharge hole at the back of the collection box and possibly fashion some sort of chute to direct the clippings away from air inlet. If you want an authorized answer try contacting Flymo.


3

Yes, as long as they are not established already, mowing them will kill them pretty much straight away. The only concern I would have is if they are suckers sprouting from the roots, such as happens with sumac and damsons. In this case mowing them could effectively coppice them, causing more to appear, and they should be pulled off the root instead. I don't ...


2

Well simply amazing. Here are the facts for cool season grass mixes. KEEP at 3" period. The reason is that these grass species need the topgrowth to feed (plants produce their own FOOD via photosynthesis) adequately the genetically large root systems. Any shorter and no amount of fertilizer, water will make your grass healthy. You are on borrowed time. ...


2

Basic rule of thumb is.. If head spins clockwise debris exits on the left and it's best to cut from the right. For counter-clockwise it's the opposite. You want debris to blow away from the area you're cutting and away from you. That will indicate which direction you walk to as you want to walk towards the uncut area. Personally though I find that sometimes ...


2

Also known as Grasscycling. Grass clippings are 80% water and a time releasing organic fertilizer. There are only 2 main reasons not to Grasscycle. If you see signs of lawn disease, to avoid spreading the fungus. You recently applied a weed control product to the lawn. Left on the lawn, grass clippings rapidly decompose being 80% water and serve as a ...


2

I own an older 6.5 hp Craftsman push mower from Sears. This unit has front wheel drive. The manual states to tip it with the carb and air filter facing up. If you tip it back with the spark plug facing up,the oil will run out the cap.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible