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16

Moss is just fine in your compost! Moss is one of the great opportunists in the plant world. Moss is not hurting your lawn. The presence of moss is telling us your lawn is not vigorous enough, you are watering too often and too shallowly, you are probably mowing too short and you've possibly got shade involved. The cool thing about moss is that if there ...


10

Moss on an indoor pot is a sign that the mix surface is constantly damp, and that isn't good. Use a fork or toothpick or something, and stir up the top layer to get rid of it. Always allow the top 1/2" or so to dry between waterings. Competition shouldn't be a problem except for very small seedlings, and the flavor should be fine.


9

Moss will not harm the tree! Good news indeed because the forests around here would be in BIG trouble! Moss does not have true roots - their "roots" are just for the purpose anchoring themselves to things like trees, rocks and whatever really. The "roots" don't penetrate the tree or steal any nutrients or water from the tree. Leave the moss, and the ...


8

Since you are a renter, I would suggest embracing the moss as a short green groundcover that tolerates the conditions, since grass won't, and as a renter you can't solve the conditions that favor moss over grass growth. If you were not a renter you could (possibly, sometimes even owners don't own the trees that make their lawns shady) remove whatever is ...


7

Moss cannot compete with grass under ideal conditions for grass. You could cultivate a moss garden. It never needs mowing! To improve conditions for grass you can do some or all of these: more light: can you cut back any trees or shrubs to let more light in? reduce compaction due to foot traffic or absence of organic matter add a hard path where people ...


6

You can use just about any light source but each has it's consequences for your design: fluorescent lights are cheap, have a long life, tubes are available to mimic sunlight and they don't generate a lot of heat in comparison to halogens. The output decreases as the bulbs age and I found replacing them every five thousand hours worked best. With the ballast ...


6

It's a little time-consuming, but 100% organic: Pour boiling water on them. This cooks the plant. Smells quite like brewing tea when pouring the water on them, and a day or three later the weeds are quite obviously dead - easy to sweep up and dispose of.


6

The steps would be: kill the weeds Remove the earth that lets the weeds grow from between the bricks (can be tricky, a power washer set on a low setting might work) replace the earth with polymeric sand (it's fine silica sand with cement that will harden and make it hard for future weeds to take root). Ideally, there's also a weedblock underneath the ...


6

In carved stone, there shouldn't be any chemicals or toxins. At least, as part of rock, they shouldn't be coming away (people typically carve out of hard rock, so that will diminish wear and tear). There really shouldn't be anything to worry about. As for the surface, rough is helpful. Cracks and poc marks/small holes is even better. Moss is a non-vascular ...


6

Yes, Moss grows leaves. They are simple leaves 1 cell thick, and they grow on a thin stem. Moss plants have no vascular tissue, so water and nutrients can only travel through the plant by diffusion. This limits the size moss plants can grow, and also makes them prone to drying out, so the largest moss plants are only found in constant moist. As for the ...


6

Now I can see the images, a few things.There is not much moss, but there is dog lichen and what looks like new thistle growth coming through - either that or some kind of lichen growth, but if it feels prickly, its thistle. If it is thistle, it's stunted and small because it's being cut all the time. The presence of dog lichen is evidence of a compacted, ...


6

Moss is an opportunist. Spores are everywhere. The moss on the ground is not making the moss on the tree. Moisture (we must be looking at the north side of your tree, yes)? Is all moss needs. I would scrape the moss off the tree...at least in the Y's between branches and trunk. Otherwise, I would not mess with the moss on the ground. Perhaps a thin ...


5

Unfortunately, there isn't an easy long term answer - the reason there's moss there is because of the conditions you describe - shady and damp. What happens over time is, the moss takes over, grass dies out, and weeds grow in the barer patches along with the moss. The usual way to resolve this problem is to remove the offending patch of lawn, since it'll ...


5

If your fireplace is used regularly you may find it difficult to get moss started - it grows best in outdoor alpine conditions (ie cool/cold, shaded, damp) That said, you could bring some established moss inside to try on one of the rocks furthest from the fire, and possibly run a fine sprinkler system to keep the stones damp. I have seen a setup for ...


5

Moss grows in a variety of environments and plants like Irish Moss may be of interest to you as well given the similar appearance. Moss cannot out compete grasses or other perennials except in special environments (think temperate rain forest). You would need to remove the competitors such as grasses. provide shade provide a soil that is damp or retains ...


5

In dealing with an overgrown or neglected orchard, assuming that "orchard" fits what you want to do, major pruning is almost always needed. Ripping it all out is likely to be a step backward unless orchard is not what you want to continue with. That may, of itself, help with fruit survival (if due to overtaxing the trees from excessive set) but there are a ...


4

I grow moss indoors in several conditions. If you want moss and other plants to grow on you rocks you could try this. Mix one quart of worm compost, 8 oz. of compost, and three gallons of water in a bucket. soak the rocks in this mixture for ten minutes. Sprinkle heavily with soil. Go outside and gather moss from rocks in your area. This ensures that the ...


4

Some mosses from outside will establish indoors in good indirect light. However they need constant access to moisture. For the integrity of your house I could not recommend having fire and water close to each other. I believe the most practical method would be to set up a planter box. If the dimensions were one or two feet long by 6 inches wide and at ...


4

As you've treated the moss with ferrous sulphate, wait 4-6 weeks, rake out the dead moss, then I'd use grass seed, a shady mix (though I've no idea what kind of grass you're growing), scratch up the surface on the bare parts to give an inch of friable soil, then broadcast the seed. Keep watered - whether it grows well or not is irrelevant - the idea is to ...


4

Vinegar works on killing both weeds and moss. If you want an all natural approach I'd recommend this article/video on how to kill weeds with vinegar that only requires vinegar, dish soap, water, and a spray bottle. Easy, effective, and inexpensive but be careful not to get the solution on any areas with grass that you want to remain. Hope this helps!


4

There is a red lichen, but as far as I'm aware, lichens are not something you'd be able to buy, and even if you could, you can't just attach it in some way. The usual method is to paint the statue with live yoghurt, keep it somewhere shady and wait and see which mosses/lichens start to grow. Lichens which grow on something rich in iron or copper tend to be ...


4

Peat has been extensively used for years as a soil amendment or an ingredient in the mix for potting composts. Nutrient level is low to non existent, but because it holds onto water, it can also retain nutrients which are present in the potting mix or garden soil. It has an acid ph, and there's usually a high proportion of peat in potting mixes for acid ...


4

This product is primarily intended for use as a growing medium for particular plants such as Sarracenia/carnivorous ones, or for mixing in to other materials to create a particular potting mix to supposedly improve water retention, or, if you like the look of dead moss, topdressing some plant pots. Some bits of it may start growing again, but the bulk of it ...


4

You can add it to a compost heap, so long as one part moss is mixed with 4 parts other materials. It can also be stored in a bag and added to the compost over time if there's too much straightaway. That, though, assumes you have not used chemicals on the lawn during the last few weeks - if you have, then its not much use for anything. Birds often take it ...


4

Definitely Marchantia polymorpha, but that and the presence of moss means the soil in that container or pot or whatever it is is stagnant and waterlogged. It needs aerating by turning the soil over, preferably adding some balanced fertilizer at the same time, if you want to grow other plants in there. If you're quite happy with it growing there, and don't ...


3

Unless you change the conditions that allow the moss to compete successfully with grass you will not kill the moss. It will be back... increase the amount of light in the area improve the quality of the soil better aeration see here


3

Moss control, if it was ferrous sulphate, will bring your soil pH down...more acidic. Lawns prefer a pH slightly more alkaline. Do a soil test to show what the pH is and then add lime to raise the pH using the directions on your packages and whatever grass that you have find the best pH range for your type of grass. I'd divide the total amount of lime by ...


3

That isn't mold, it's moss/algae. You can tell (by the green) that it's growing from energy obtained by photosynthesis, so it's not a big threat competition-wise. It's a sign that the mix is constantly moist on the surface, and also grows faster in high humidity. It will not damage the cactus seedlings, but here's a tip. When cacti germinate, they grow ...


3

For the moss I sprinkle baking soda. It turns brown and dies after a few weeks. I spoke nicely to our cafe lady and she got me industrial size 1kg bags of the stuff. For the weeds I use a glyphospahte based spray, commonly known as 'Roundup' here in NZ.


3

Firstly, you will need a large terrarium for even dwarf trees, and secondly, even dwarf trees will outgrow a large terrarium given enough time. If your family members are bonsai experts, this shouldn't be an issue. Also note that most trees native to Oregon are accustomed to a colder period during winter, often dropping below freezing. Without this treatment ...


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