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18

Moss is just fine in your compost! Moss is one of the great opportunists in the plant world. Moss is not hurting your lawn. The presence of moss is telling us your lawn is not vigorous enough, you are watering too often and too shallowly, you are probably mowing too short and you've possibly got shade involved. The cool thing about moss is that if there ...


10

Moss on an indoor pot is a sign that the mix surface is constantly damp, and that isn't good. Use a fork or toothpick or something, and stir up the top layer to get rid of it. Always allow the top 1/2" or so to dry between waterings. Competition shouldn't be a problem except for very small seedlings, and the flavor should be fine.


9

Moss will not harm the tree! Good news indeed because the forests around here would be in BIG trouble! Moss does not have true roots - their "roots" are just for the purpose anchoring themselves to things like trees, rocks and whatever really. The "roots" don't penetrate the tree or steal any nutrients or water from the tree. Leave the moss, and the ...


8

Since you are a renter, I would suggest embracing the moss as a short green groundcover that tolerates the conditions, since grass won't, and as a renter you can't solve the conditions that favor moss over grass growth. If you were not a renter you could (possibly, sometimes even owners don't own the trees that make their lawns shady) remove whatever is ...


6

In carved stone, there shouldn't be any chemicals or toxins. At least, as part of rock, they shouldn't be coming away (people typically carve out of hard rock, so that will diminish wear and tear). There really shouldn't be anything to worry about. As for the surface, rough is helpful. Cracks and poc marks/small holes is even better. Moss is a non-vascular ...


6

Yes, Moss grows leaves. They are simple leaves 1 cell thick, and they grow on a thin stem. Moss plants have no vascular tissue, so water and nutrients can only travel through the plant by diffusion. This limits the size moss plants can grow, and also makes them prone to drying out, so the largest moss plants are only found in constant moist. As for the ...


6

Now I can see the images, a few things.There is not much moss, but there is dog lichen and what looks like new thistle growth coming through - either that or some kind of lichen growth, but if it feels prickly, its thistle. If it is thistle, it's stunted and small because it's being cut all the time. The presence of dog lichen is evidence of a compacted, ...


6

Moss is an opportunist. Spores are everywhere. The moss on the ground is not making the moss on the tree. Moisture (we must be looking at the north side of your tree, yes)? Is all moss needs. I would scrape the moss off the tree...at least in the Y's between branches and trunk. Otherwise, I would not mess with the moss on the ground. Perhaps a thin ...


5

You can add it to a compost heap, so long as one part moss is mixed with 4 parts other materials. It can also be stored in a bag and added to the compost over time if there's too much straightaway. That, though, assumes you have not used chemicals on the lawn during the last few weeks - if you have, then its not much use for anything. Birds often take it ...


5

As you've treated the moss with ferrous sulphate, wait 4-6 weeks, rake out the dead moss, then I'd use grass seed, a shady mix (though I've no idea what kind of grass you're growing), scratch up the surface on the bare parts to give an inch of friable soil, then broadcast the seed. Keep watered - whether it grows well or not is irrelevant - the idea is to ...


5

Unfortunately, there isn't an easy long term answer - the reason there's moss there is because of the conditions you describe - shady and damp. What happens over time is, the moss takes over, grass dies out, and weeds grow in the barer patches along with the moss. The usual way to resolve this problem is to remove the offending patch of lawn, since it'll ...


5

In dealing with an overgrown or neglected orchard, assuming that "orchard" fits what you want to do, major pruning is almost always needed. Ripping it all out is likely to be a step backward unless orchard is not what you want to continue with. That may, of itself, help with fruit survival (if due to overtaxing the trees from excessive set) but there are a ...


4

Unless you change the conditions that allow the moss to compete successfully with grass you will not kill the moss. It will be back... increase the amount of light in the area improve the quality of the soil better aeration see here


4

Moss control, if it was ferrous sulphate, will bring your soil pH down...more acidic. Lawns prefer a pH slightly more alkaline. Do a soil test to show what the pH is and then add lime to raise the pH using the directions on your packages and whatever grass that you have find the best pH range for your type of grass. I'd divide the total amount of lime by ...


4

There is a red lichen, but as far as I'm aware, lichens are not something you'd be able to buy, and even if you could, you can't just attach it in some way. The usual method is to paint the statue with live yoghurt, keep it somewhere shady and wait and see which mosses/lichens start to grow. Lichens which grow on something rich in iron or copper tend to be ...


4

This product is primarily intended for use as a growing medium for particular plants such as Sarracenia/carnivorous ones, or for mixing in to other materials to create a particular potting mix to supposedly improve water retention, or, if you like the look of dead moss, topdressing some plant pots. Some bits of it may start growing again, but the bulk of it ...


4

Peat has been extensively used for years as a soil amendment or an ingredient in the mix for potting composts. Nutrient level is low to non existent, but because it holds onto water, it can also retain nutrients which are present in the potting mix or garden soil. It has an acid ph, and there's usually a high proportion of peat in potting mixes for acid ...


4

Definitely Marchantia polymorpha, but that and the presence of moss means the soil in that container or pot or whatever it is is stagnant and waterlogged. It needs aerating by turning the soil over, preferably adding some balanced fertilizer at the same time, if you want to grow other plants in there. If you're quite happy with it growing there, and don't ...


3

Not quite “in the garden” — but you can always consider drying the moss and selling it at a local crafts fair or flea market, or selling or gifting the moss to a friend who will do so. Similar to one of the suggestions given in another answer here. You might be surprised at the demand for such things in some niches. Most of what you would see in craft ...


3

Moss is of no health concern to trees. Spanish Moss (which isn't a moss) hangs from branches and its weight can be harmful, but actual moss is nothing to worry about. Proper care is necessary to have healthy trees. Sometimes an abundance of moss or harmless lichens is an indication of poor air circulation. Check the proper pruning techniques for your tree. (...


3

If moss GIRDLES the tree YES it can. If moss is completely surrounding the tree and stays there long enough to hold moisture next to the bark, that will allow bacteria to begin decomposing the bark and compromising the vascular system just below. Somehow, in moist climates, moss on the north side only, seems to be just fine and I think the trees just thicken ...


3

Firstly, you will need a large terrarium for even dwarf trees, and secondly, even dwarf trees will outgrow a large terrarium given enough time. If your family members are bonsai experts, this shouldn't be an issue. Also note that most trees native to Oregon are accustomed to a colder period during winter, often dropping below freezing. Without this treatment ...


3

That isn't mold, it's moss/algae. You can tell (by the green) that it's growing from energy obtained by photosynthesis, so it's not a big threat competition-wise. It's a sign that the mix is constantly moist on the surface, and also grows faster in high humidity. It will not damage the cactus seedlings, but here's a tip. When cacti germinate, they grow ...


3

No, having a layer of moss in a closed terrarium is not similar to having activated charcoal, they serve different purposes.The activated charcoal, placed between the soil and the moss, acts as a sort of filter, absorbing smells and bacteria. There should be a half inch layer of activated charcoal spread across the surface of the growing medium, which is ...


3

Power or pressure washing is the only way to remove this growth. What I think is causing this is excess fertilizer. From washing out of your grass and over the sidewalk or after fertilizing, you aren't blowing the fertilizer off your walk. Do any of your neighbors have this on the walks beside their lawns? I've never encountered this before but by ...


3

It's hard to give detailed advice without actually seeing what you've got there. It sounds like a relatively large area, with around 400 trees. I think you should start by simply thinking about it - what do you want to achieve long term? Are you trying to create a garden, with ornamental plants in it, or do you primarily want to grow food plants like ...


3

Fixus elastica is native to humid climate, therefore it makes good friends with moss. As for the moss, it depends on the indoor humidity a lot. If you have powerful heating, which dries the air, the moss won’t grow well. So if your towels easily get completely dry indoors, it’s probably not the best for mosses. Anyway, it’s a good idea to make an ...


3

You should start liking the mosses. Very nice and relaxing. And it make your garden have an "alpine look". You may remove it (strong brush), or just turning them, but they will return quickly, unless you try to fight humidity: more sand and stones, less mulch, and maybe you should remove some trees (so having more sun). In such case you may have a more "...


3

You are correct it looks like fungi growing on the dead parts of the moss. But then again, as @kevinsky pointed out This could be the result of incorrect watering leading to salts being deposited on to the moss. Moss needs high humidity and it would die back when facing extreme temperatures with in a few hours. You should cut/remove all the dead plant ...


3

If your raised beds are in full sun, then no moss will ever grow around them. I can offer you two alternatives: Bricks, or brick-sized pavers, set up against the edges of the beds along all four sides. You don't need to spend a lot of time setting these, as you won't be walking on them - just dig a 1.5" deep, brick-width, flat-bottomed trench and drop them ...


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