8

On the assumption you mean plants suitable for pots outdoors, lemon scented plants such as Citronella and Lemon Balm are good. Plants offered for sale under the name citronella vary - the one to look for is Cymbopogon nardus, or Citronella winterianus. Cymbopogon does not like cold temperatures, and should be fine with your climate, but regular (possibly ...


7

There are a number of ways you can try and control mosquitoes.I've listed them in order of effectiveness Prevent them having a breeding ground and/or kill existing larvae. Basically most still water is perfect for mosquito larvae. We had some breeding in an old barrel full of rain and fixed the problem with a bit of washing up liquid; we noticed a huge ...


6

If you can manage to get a few marigolds, plant those. They thrive on a lot of sunshine, can be grown in pots, and are good at repelling mosquitoes and most other insect pests. The beautiful flowers are a bonus.


6

No, we live in a wet area, and we also plant chrysanthemums. They will not keep the mosquitoes away, or even help. Not just any plants from the genus Chrysanthemum will do. People derive the insecticide 'pyrethrin' from Chrysanthemum Cinerariifolium, which isn't the common garden chrysanthemum, and Chrysanthemum Coccineum, or painted daisy. Even planting one ...


5

I read that in Malta it is frequent to use basil to repel mosquitoes. It likes sun, but it should be watered often to maintain the green leaves and smell (though it is also resilient to dry periods).


4

A light vegetable oil. A miniscule amount can float on the water surface and totally gum up larval mosquito breathing. Put enough drops in to produce an oil sheen on the water surface. BTI Mosquito disks - they float on the surface, slowly dissolving and release BTI, a soil bacteria that's lethal to the mosquito intestinal tract.


4

Tomatoes are here in Germany a quite reliable plant. Planted in a pot and placed either on the windowsill or flanking doors or around your patio, they deter mosquitoes and flies quite well. Obviously not as "guaranteed" as netting or screens and if you leave the light on and the window open, no amount of tomatoes will stop the blighters, but combined with ...


3

There are various effects. Mosquitoes search some stable water, so if there are other sources of water, they prefer other places. Additionally, there is not much water (usually) on succulents to create dangers to predators, so the eggs are less protected. Finally, succulents should be keep dry most of the time, they like dry climate. So, I would say it ...


3

I would recommend against trying to spray against them, even if you can find a product suitable for the job, you are unlikely to be able to spray a wide enough area for it be effective. If you did spray you would do vast amounts of damage to populations of other beneficial creatures (including some that eat mosquitoes). Things to consider: Remove their ...


3

I water my plants with fountain water. Then I use chlorinated water to refill the fountain. The chlorine kills algae and mosquito larvae. The running fountain removes the chlorine. Repeat a day or two later.


2

It looks like eatable leaf if I'm not mistaken and it grow mostly in Jungle in wet place... My Grandfather told me it's good to eat as it removes unwanted worm from our body and also purifies our blood.It smells bad but once you try it, you will love it.My mum send some roots and I planted it in my balcony, if you want the picture I will send it :). I was ...


2

There are many web sites that make wide ranging statements about plants that repel mosquitoes. I cannot find any academic research that supports this. I can find university sites that say that there is no plant that acts as a mosquito repellent by just being there. Any essential oils in the plant leaves must distributed in the air or applied to skin before ...


2

Although the genus Culex is usually characterized as laying floating egg rafts on still water, a new study suggests most species of Culex oviposit out of water. In the genus Culex, oviposition is often generalized as laying floating egg rafts directly on the surface of the water, as reported for arbovirus vectors Culex pipiens L. and Culex tarsalis ...


2

You need to eliminate any standing water in the area. That may be problematic (the water may not be on your property), but mosquitoes require water to complete their life cycle, and they don't need much.


1

Adding to @kevinsky answer , a fan is the best way to get rid of them. I use a cheap 24" box fan on low set 20 ft away. A slight breeze will stop them . Removing water is good but what about neighbors and things like bromeliads that hold enough water for a few larva ?


1

Your plant is basically a pelargonium (colloquially called geraniums) with a lot of lemony scent. So the propagation process is the same as for other geraniums: make cuttings from new growth, dip the ends in rooting hormone (optional) and stick them in soil. From experience, the scented types are a bit fussier to propagate than the decorative P. ...


1

There is too little water to attract mosquitoes to lay their eggs. You do need to worry about a kitty bowl full of water in the shade yet able to fill when it rains. But not the droplets on succulents. Leaving anything out of doors that can collect water and last for longer than a week is mosquito hatching water. Where is it that you live? We've got ...


1

The breeding waters are the best place to REDUCE the numbers. I have a couple ponds , but I think mosquitoes are too smart to lay eggs in water with fish. I also have a couple rain barrels and I scoop out larva every few days to put into my aquariums , the fish go crazy. My problem area is bromeliad plants , mosquitoes breed in the retained water. To stop ...


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