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7

I thought of doing the same on a piece of land I own. I thought a lot about it, and now I finally got the chance of building a new house on that property. So what I'm thinking now is I'll wait after the digging machines are done with their job, wait they put back the earth in place and put the seed afterwards. I tried it on someone else property where I ...


3

Assuming you want to create an actual meadow i.e. permanent diverse grassland with (predominantly perennial) forbs you need to reduce fertility. As a landscape architect I'm frequently asked to design natural meadows for ecological mitigation (usually much large areas than yours). They all start the same way: strip topsoil down to subsoil, power-harrow ...


3

In mid spring: Mow, wait 4-5 days, when the grass is growing at it's fastest, and spray with a glyphosate solution of 1 1/2 - 2 oz. of 41% glyphosate concentrate to a gallon of water. Spray until wet, but before runoff. You can add a surfactant if necessary. If you use Roundup promax, decrease the rate, as this is based on a smaller molecule, built on ...


3

Mow, (precede with herbicide if you go that way and give it a few weeks to work), till (or plow, then cultivate) every 3 weeks for several months, seed. Could insert step of smother crop (buckwheat traditional, possibly rye over the winter) in there, then till a few more times. Basic idea being to sprout as many weed seeds as possible and THEN put in your ...


2

Go rent a sod cutter. Easy peasy. You can then take the sod and turn it over to make some softly rolling plant beds so it isn't just flat. Get some top soil and cover all with a couple of inches and roll. Or use the sod for plant beds around your foundation (watch for drainage back into your foundation keeping sod, soil, gravel 4" below siding 2" below ...


2

First thing to do is outline the area you want in wildflowers only. Rent a sod cutter that takes out all grass and roots...turn over to store as compost or to make plant beds. Great stuff, don't get rid of it. Pile up on areas you'd like beds or areas you would like to kill weeds. Turn upside down and top with 4 inches of topsoil and lastly 2" of mulch. ...


2

Looks like Storksbill (Erodium cicutarium), a member of the Geranium family. Low-growing, likes sandy soils, found in New York. Here's a photo: https://l7.alamy.com/zooms/ee218e16ce234c1dae7ea0a877f50dd3/storksbill-fc845f.jpg and another:


1

You cannot just let a yard "go" and expect it to return to a meadow. I have a non-nearby neighbor who thinks that's the way to garden "naturally" and has done just that, after initially planting native perennials and grasses. Now, they have an impressive collection of weeds mixed in with/dominating their plantings. Among the beauties on ...


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