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4

The best time of year is about now (depending on your climate). Move it as soon as the leaves have changed color. It will be going dormant for winter, but the ground will still be warm enough so the roots can recover from the shock of being moved, without the extra stress of the water needed by the leaves while they were still green.


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Inspect the leaves closely with a magnifying glass - I'm seeing what might be remains of webbing and even what might be a small, pale caterpillar, first picture, on the large, browning leaf. Check the undersides too - if what I think I can see is right, you may have had a light infestation of moth larvae, but likely most have turned into moths now and left......


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I don't know where your information on 2020 production is coming from, but the Maple News reports that production in the US (Vermont, New York, Maine) was a record, also in Quebec. The industry provides guidelines for how many spiles in a tree of a certain size, so you might want to get the recommendations for your area. A study by Wilmot, Perkins, Stowe and ...


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Acer platanoides globosum is usually grafted (Source). When a grafted plant grows root sprouts (also called "suckers"), you should trim off the root sprouts. Otherwise they can out-compete the top part of the tree, causing the top of the tree to die.


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The herbicide Weed-B-Gone comes in a variety that kills both broadleaf weeds and crabgrass. I've used it, and it works as advertised. Note that you'll still need to remove any plantain in the area by hand because, while the herbicide does indeed kill it, the weed is able to still set and disburse seeds as it dies. I also hand-remove any black medic for the ...


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Well, I spent a lot of time looking for solutions, and came up with a few suggestions. 1 - herbicides that are recommended for woody plants (Triclopyr or Picloram as the active ingredient) are the ones that work. They take a while to work, though. The chemical should be applied to a freshly cut stump so it absorbs into the root. This is best done in the ...


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I agree with the other answer that they do look as if they might well be Japanese Acer seeds. The only thing to add is that they do not often come true to the parent tree, so you won't know what tree you will get. You could grow on some seedlings and when they are big enough, try grafting part of your existing tree to them, then you will get more of the ...


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The certainly look like Japanese maple seeds. If you are looking at your 1-metre tall tree from above, the seeds will be hidden under the leaves, and the flowers (which won't be there any more) are very inconspicuous. If you want to plant them, they will not germinate unless they have a winter cold period. If you just plant them in the ground, that will ...


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Thanks for the extra information. I wondered how that Acer dissectum at the back had got so big if its contained in a pot! Well of course, it isn't, because it's rooted into the soil beneath through the pot... As it's rooted into the ground, I'm sorry to say the most likely explanation is Acer dieback. This is quite common in Acer varieties (especially ...


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