10

Efficient - toss it. Nostalgia or other emotional attachment - water it and see what happens. It's mostly dead. Whether it's all dead or not would be ignored by the efficient approach, investigated by the other approach. Don't fertilize it. Just water it. Fertilizer is not helpful to plants that are not actively growing, and would do more harm than good ...


7

Here's what we eventually did to save the plant, mostly following the answers: Removed the dead leaves and cut the dead parts off of other leaves. Pruned the roots, and cleaned the green goo. This is pretty easy by washing the roots under a faucet. Changed the pebble, because it was covered with green goo. We use potting soil instead of the pebble it came ...


6

Unfortunately, once the stem or leaves start to yellow, they are very unlikely to recover, even if the growing conditions improve. But the plant is not necessarily lost. You have two options. The botanical name for "lucky bamboo" is Dracaena sanderiana (commonly referred to as a Dracaena plant). If this a larger, mature plant with multiple side ...


6

A yellowing stalk (if it was originally green) means its going to die -you need to remove that stem asap so that any possible infection doesn't affect the other stems. In theory, the possible causes are: the plant was exposed to temperatures below 65 deg F; you've not been using purified water; the water level got a little low and the stem can no longer ...


5

The best way to deal with this plant is to grow it under higher light conditions so it does not get so etiolated or leggy. This species is robust so you can cut the stems back where they come out from the main stem and root them in water. You could probably cut the long stretched out stems into six inch chunks and root them in water even if they do not ...


4

You can use tap water if you use a water filter. Even a portable filter as along as it has activated carbon in it. That will soak up the chloramine and a few other compounds that some plants are sensitive to. Distilled water is not a good solution as it has no dissolved compounds and plants use some of the things in water, just not the chlorine levels ...


4

It sounds to me like your bamboo isn't getting enough light, and because of that the stems are not growing stout enough to support themselves after they get to a certain height. You likely need to increase the light you are giving the plant, and if the larger stem won't support itself, you can always cut it off near the base and root it into a new plant.


4

There are two issues here the container and the plant: You can try Phyllostachys bissetii which is a runner type that is hardy to around -20 degrees celsius. It is shallow rooted and suitable for containers. The main problem I see is that this plant wants to be 16' tall (~3.5 metres). Unless you have an unusual balcony the plant is likely to be thin at the ...


4

In the past year I've only changed the water once for mine and they seem to be doing fine. I suspect the yellow leaves could be caused by the constant onslaught of chlorinated water. I'd suggest changing the water less frequently. (Maybe every two weeks would make her happy.) More importantly, I'd recommend using declorinated water. One easy way to get ...


4

There are a number of possible explanations for the problems you're having. You are growing the plant hydroponically. Hydroponic plant roots need oxygen from moving water, or a large enough water surface to replenish oxygen. If they don't, they can rot. I suggest removing the plant from the water and smell it to see if the roots are rotting. The plant ...


3

I have a very healthy Aloe Vera as well as giant Lucky Bamboo (potted in soil), I use regular tap water for them and they are growing well. (You can use normal drinking water if you want!) Both of these plants are strong enough, hence you may not worry about them. Some key points for these plants are: Aloe Vera: Water it low to moderately. Keep it in ...


3

I'd suggest changing the water using fresh bottled water, and putting the plants into separate containers so whatever is affecting one won't affect the other. The yellow leaves can be removed as they are dead.


2

I had the same problem last year. The 4 lucky bamboo plants I had for about 2 years, started getting yellow leaves here & there. Then I noticed the stalk on one was yellow. I looked at around 10-15 different sites about that issue w the bamboo, and did what they all said. Separate the yellow stalk from the rest to prevent spreading; changed the ...


2

Two things...too much water and too cold. Lucky Bamboo likes the temp to stay above 65F. Algae does not use the same nutrients as more complex plants do and not at the same proportions, algae will eat a lot more phosporous and nitrogen than anything else, but will generally not use other nutrients. I know most fertilize is NPK based, but that's totally and ...


2

How much water was in the jar when you received it? Because lucky bamboo can adapt to grow in straight water, sometimes with sand/rocks as a root anchorage/substrate. In that case, keep it filled to near the level of the top of the sand/rocks. You can't really overwater, when the plant is adapted to these conditions, except to fill it until it spills :), ...


2

I wouldn't clean it with sandalwood. When you cut lucky bamboo, you need to seal it with wax, if you don't it can get moisture in the bamboo and cause rot. Lucky bamboo needs fertilizer about once a month. Green Green is great and is cheap and will keep your plant green http://amzn.com/B004490QYI Lucky bamboo is sensitive to tap water (chlorine and ...


2

Mine was turning yellow until I stopped with tap water and started only giving it filtered or distilled water.


2

I've had one of these bamboo plants for approximately 10-11 years I use distilled water on it and indirect light and it just keeps growing.


2

Hey great question Mahdi! It seems to me you might be over thinking the problem a bit. Lucky bamboo is pretty forgiving when it comes to propagation. Simply cut the new growth stocks at their base near the node where they are growing from and plant the stock in a chlorine-free water and gravel mixture. Understand that Lucky Bamboo is not actually bamboo at ...


2

Lucky Bamboos are Dracaena Sanderiana plants you can check what cares does it need on sites like this one Dracaenas Sanderiana grows in water, there are other kinds of Dracaenas that grow in soil. Usually they grow really well in Ball Jelly because they provide moisture, air and nutrients, so you can keep it in Ball jelly and change the jelly from time to ...


1

If it was growing in water prior to you planting it in soil, it needs to grow new roots. The roots that plants grow in water are different then when they are planted in soil. A similar phenomenon happens, when a soil based plants is transplanted into a hydroponic system. It sheds the old roots to grow roots that are more adapt to it's new environment.


1

Boiling will not remove chloramine. Some plants are sensitive to the chlorine so your options are: filtered water using a carbon filter distilled water (no dissolved ions so not a good choice long term) rain water tap water plus a chloramine neutralizer. This can be purchased in any shop that sells things for pet fish.


1

Lucky bamboos are very hardy plants, so it has perfect chances to recover. If the roots were damaged when you were on vacation, than it is possible that the plant can not produce enough nutrients for the new leaves. So it could be a solution to cut you plant into cuttings and propagate them again in the water. So you’ ll have new fresh roots and healthier ...


1

These are definitely it’s own aerial roots. You can cut this stem and replant it, so you’ll have more fluffy plant bouquet.


1

I'm just a little south of you in the Seattle WA area, and there are tons of options when it comes to bamboo that will thrive around here. For planter use, I'd recommend a small clumping variety, like Rufa. It will be plenty hardy, can tolerate shade, and grows 7-10ft. You'll need to keep the watering up, at least until it is well established. It would be ...


1

You need do change the water it is so dirty the bacteri and fungi is killing the bamboo. If you change the water weekly the bamboo will get healthier


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