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6

It is lichen, yes - if it's only excessive on dead branches, that's why it's proliferating, because the wood is dead, although it does occur on live branches or trunks of trees as well, though not quite so enthusiastically. It won't be the cause of the dieback on some branches, it's just opportunistically decided to grow there. You may wish to prune out ...


4

You can pick them. As you may have noticed, sometimes in the store they are yellow w/some green. Some are picked when they are completely green, most are picked with some green. By the time they get to the store they are completely yellow or mostly yellow and ripe. You've waited long enough. ENJOY :)


3

The problem with sandy soil is that while it allows natural rainfall and irrigation to percolate down to the roots the soil cannot hold on to the moisture long enough for the tree to benefit fully from it. If you examine the leaves of citrus you will find that they are often coated with a waxy shiny surface which helps reduce trainspiration but the fruits ...


3

We can see from the leaf base marks on the stem that the leaves were naturally separated and discarded by the plant. This may be an over-reaction by the plant to too much water. Citrus plants are known for "leaf drop" when they are too wet at the roots. Think back to your watering practices and recall that many citrus plants grow in quite warm countries ...


3

It's lichen and is not a problem. It won't hurt your lemon tree.


3

Personally, I would wait. As I noted in a previous question, I treated a clementine orange horribly and it lived for years. It may be that, if you left the plant in the dark, then that is what's causing the leaves to drop, since citrus can take quite a bit of dryness, especially in winter. I'm pretty confident that you'll have new leaves sprouting by mid-...


2

Don't over-think things. I successfully grew a Clementine from seed and kept it for years until it got too large and ugly. In the winter, I generally ignored it (I live in Wisconsin, so it's "winter" something like 7 months of the year). I would put it outside in mid-May - in the shade - and bring it in again in late September. Every time I moved it, it lost ...


2

I have the same problems on my Meyer lemon tree. The deformities are caused by the Asian citrus psyllid. They are little grey bugs that suck on the new leaves. Whenever the bug feeds, it releases a toxin that causes the leave to curl. You can read more about them here. The easiest way to get rid of them is to either hand pick them off or use an insecticide, ...


2

The RHS has an interesting note on nutrient deficiency. Note particularly the comment on magnesium where it indicates that lack of this nutrient in the plant can cause browning of the leaves, but more important that too much potassium can prevent uptake of magnesium. There may be a good amount of Mg. in the feed but if it gets blocked then strange things can ...


2

It is a watering issue. First I will discuss cause, then about way you might be able to save your plant. Both under watering and over watering, have curled leaves when the leaves are completely dead. In the case of under watering the plant dried out. The leaves being the thinnest part of the plant will die the quickest. It would be losing water in two ...


2

This appears to be mealybugs on your lemon tree. If you can isolate a few and examine under magnification compare to the images here and see if they match up. If the plant is reasonably small one simple treatment is to use a Qtip and rubbing alcohol to wipe off the patches you see. Keep a watchful eye for new patches, and repeat until they are all gone.


1

The easiest answer is yes. If you are uncertain if your area can grow citrus, then dig it up. Most Citrus require USDA Zone 9 or warmer. Even so, this is the temperature where the cold will kill the entire plants. You need protect from becoming defoliated or killing your crop in the winter. This is going to be 1 to 2 zones higher. Meaning Zone 10 or 11....


1

I see two issues that might be the cause of your project gone sour. First, the light seems not professional grow light, but just normal light? Plants need special grow lamps, there are cheaper LED alternatives now. But I think the main cause of the leaves drop is humidity. When you grow them indoor, the air is too dry for most plants. You can try to ...


1

Using this fish fertilizer is amazing for citrus. I use onmy lemon tree as directed on bottle. I have tons of blooms that smell heavenly and beautiful fruit. I will bring it in for the winter here in New Jersey. I water a bit daily. It started as a little tiny lemon tree from home depot last year.


1

Leaf drop: most common reason for this is temperature changes. note: citrus trees go dormant during winter and require different watering schedule then normal. although it seems that you are doing all that you can correctly so far the only thing I can notice is that when you changed your soil you needed to ensure the ph of the soil is suitable for ...


1

I think your tree is dead. The only way to know is to scratch the bark off in various places. If it is green under the bark that part of the tree is still alive. If it is brown, black or grey underneath that part is dead. With clean pruners remove all the dead part of the tree. Then put the tree in a location it can get more sunlight. Only water it ...


1

It is responding a stressor, like not having enough light. Less light is the trigger for trees to loose their leaves in the fall. Those leaves change colour, because the plant cut off liquid to leaf. As the leaf stop making energy it shows it real colour. The colour it has without photosynthesis. Your plant should be at your brightest window and have a ...


1

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but it’s not your lemon tree that developed the nodules, it’s an armored scale infestation. (And a massive one, judging by the photo.) The ants are likely there for the honeydew, excreted by the insects - although most sources claim armored scale don’t produce it, so it may also be that they prey on them, but certainly ...


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