Hot answers tagged

3

Soil for citrus trees should be slightly acid, not alkaline, but above all should be well drained. They don't like to have their feet wet, so if there is a risk that when you water the tree the water will sit around and flood the roots then the tree will demonstrate its unhappiness by not growing or shedding leaves. Quite possibly when you moved the tree ...


3

One night of cold exposure won't have killed the tree, but it will cause death of any leaves present. Now you just need to wait, keep it in appropriate temperatures overnight and it should put out new leaves, eventually.


2

it will still produce fruit (the same as commercial varieties), but the "new variety" thing only happens by cross pollination or if you planted the seeds inside the fruit from your seedling, so it only affects the next generation of seedlings from that fruit It won't produce a new variety of lemon seeds unless it's near another compatible fruit ...


2

Citrus trees can drop all their leaves for various reasons, and quite often they will wait until the shock has passed and sprout new leaves. So the first thing to do is nothing - at least for a couple of weeks to see if anything happens. The wood that remains alive will resprout and this will tell you where the branches are still alive. At that time you can ...


1

This is scale. I looked up a great reference here on scale only to find that there are more types, colours and shapes than I could possibly imagine. I think your plant has soft brown scale. Scale on citrus is one of the most likely pests. This is an advanced infestation but you can verify my diagnosis by confirming that the rim of the pot and around it is ...


1

That's a pretty severe infestation but not uncommon on indoor citrus. In order to control them you have to understand what the control agents do. Whether it's deltamethrin, neem or dish soap these are all contact pesticides. They have to coat the spider mite to kill it. The webbings are an effective way of preventing sprays from touching the adults and the ...


1

Thanks for clarifying the active ingredient. Although that product is said to be kind of effective against spiders, spiders are not spider mites, so I'm not entirely sure it will work on spider mite, though it's more likely it will than not. If it doesn't work, I'd suggest you try neem oil spray instead next time, which is a more natural and less harmful (...


1

I know grapefruit trees that don't get proper light and/or water will sometimes shed their leaves and regrow them (especially if conditions improve); not sure about lemons, but probably. My advice is to give it more light. Put it by a window or something. My grapefruit tree hasn't lost its leaves since I put it in my bedroom, years ago (maybe in 2014 or 2015;...


1

These are mealybug and getting rid of them takes a bit of work. The process is described here. You can resolve this with soap and water but the key is wiping the plant down to crush any eggs and juveniles and repeating the process every five to seven days to get the eggs as they hatch. The warmer is is the faster they reproduce do don't delay!


1

Western Australia Dept of Ag has an interesting comment on this type of damage. Seems to be due to rats or possums, and they indicate an interesting use of dog hair as deterrent. Might be worth a try. Testing for rats or possums as the culprit might be interesting. Night time recording cameras are becoming more and more available to home gardeners.


1

I can't identify the lemons you have, but it doesn't matter if you just want to know what kind of lemon tree you'll be growing from seed because they don't come true from seed. You may end up with a huge, thorny tree that doesn't produce fruit for years, or if it does, they'e unpalatable, see here https://www.homestolove.com.au/why-its-not-a-good-idea-to-...


1

I had a Clementine seedling for years that always dropped most of its leaves every time I brought it outdoors and then again every time I brought it indoors. It was light-related: the tree didn't like going from a mostly indirect-lighted location to a mostly sunny location and vice versa. I got rid of the problem by keeping the Clementine in a mostly shaded ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible