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3

One night of cold exposure won't have killed the tree, but it will cause death of any leaves present. Now you just need to wait, keep it in appropriate temperatures overnight and it should put out new leaves, eventually.


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Soil for citrus trees should be slightly acid, not alkaline, but above all should be well drained. They don't like to have their feet wet, so if there is a risk that when you water the tree the water will sit around and flood the roots then the tree will demonstrate its unhappiness by not growing or shedding leaves. Quite possibly when you moved the tree ...


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Yes definitely. The heat will make the plant wilt and this means it has water loss. The plants usually dry up and turn into a crunchy brown before dying. If you provide some temporary shade this will help immensely! You can get a burlap and put it over the tree and this usually is not expensive. If you don't have a burlap you can use a bed sheet and create ...


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I have the same problems on my Meyer lemon tree. The deformities are caused by the Asian citrus psyllid. They are little grey bugs that suck on the new leaves. Whenever the bug feeds, it releases a toxin that causes the leave to curl. You can read more about them here. The easiest way to get rid of them is to either hand pick them off or use an insecticide, ...


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The RHS has an interesting note on nutrient deficiency. Note particularly the comment on magnesium where it indicates that lack of this nutrient in the plant can cause browning of the leaves, but more important that too much potassium can prevent uptake of magnesium. There may be a good amount of Mg. in the feed but if it gets blocked then strange things can ...


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Same happened with us. We got a special fertilizer for citrus and brushed the flowers with a little paint brush not used for anything else and we finally got some. Hope this works for you. It's like being pregnant for 2 or 3 years and not having a baby you are waiting for. So exciting when we FINALLY got fruit. haha


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it will still produce fruit (the same as commercial varieties), but the "new variety" thing only happens by cross pollination or if you planted the seeds inside the fruit from your seedling, so it only affects the next generation of seedlings from that fruit It won't produce a new variety of lemon seeds unless it's near another compatible fruit ...


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These are mealybug and getting rid of them takes a bit of work. The process is described here. You can resolve this with soap and water but the key is wiping the plant down to crush any eggs and juveniles and repeating the process every five to seven days to get the eggs as they hatch. The warmer is is the faster they reproduce do don't delay!


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Citrus trees can drop all their leaves for various reasons, and quite often they will wait until the shock has passed and sprout new leaves. So the first thing to do is nothing - at least for a couple of weeks to see if anything happens. The wood that remains alive will resprout and this will tell you where the branches are still alive. At that time you can ...


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Western Australia Dept of Ag has an interesting comment on this type of damage. Seems to be due to rats or possums, and they indicate an interesting use of dog hair as deterrent. Might be worth a try. Testing for rats or possums as the culprit might be interesting. Night time recording cameras are becoming more and more available to home gardeners.


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I had a Clementine seedling for years that always dropped most of its leaves every time I brought it outdoors and then again every time I brought it indoors. It was light-related: the tree didn't like going from a mostly indirect-lighted location to a mostly sunny location and vice versa. I got rid of the problem by keeping the Clementine in a mostly shaded ...


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A few stripped leaves is not a disaster.Purple leaves are the result of anthocyanins, chemicals in premature leaves that protect it from UV damage til they grow. Keeping the tree healthy; Lemon tree's love full sun. Most citrus trees need 8-12 hours of light a day. Keep you lemon healthy with a citrus fertilizer. NPK ratio of 6-3-3


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The little lemon tree will be quite alright after some water has been given. Two or three days will be enough. Important things not to do: don't overwater; do not change the position drastically, a bit of shade (umbrella) is enough; don't fertilize; most importantly: don't panic!


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