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17

Strictly speaking something like a sour orange is possible. A lot of things are possible really. Citrus hybridization can get very complicated. There are four 'parent species' of citrus (Citron, Pomelo, Papeda and Mandarin). A lemon is a cross between a Citron and a Sour Orange (which is itself a cross of a Mandarin and a Pomelo). So that's 3 parent species ...


15

Most citrus trees are grafted onto a different rootstock, usually sweet orange these days, even if the fruit from the top graft is going to be lemon or lime. The only way a lemon tree can completely turn into an orange tree is if the grafted part has died and the rootstock then grows on its own, producing the fruit its programmed to produce, depending on the ...


11

This plant is variegated and is likely to be Citrus limon 'Eureka Variegated Pink'. Described by the New York Times as A mutant found on an ordinary Eureka lemon tree in Burbank, Calif., around 1930, its immature fruit has green and white stripes; the older fruit loses the stripes and develops flesh pigmented pink from lycopene, which also colors ...


9

John McPhee wrote a very witty book on oranges, entitled, not surprisingly, 'Oranges'. One chapter recounts an effort to grow limes from seed, due to the pervasive presence of a virus in existing trees. Essentially, they grew hundreds of seedlings from limes, and got a tiny number of plants that grew limes. All the others produced some other citrus fruit. So,...


9

I'm not an expert on the subject, but here is my understanding. In nature, a lemon tree will never turn into an orange tree as they are completely different species: Lemon - Genus: Citrus Species: C. × limon Orange - Genus: Citrus Species: C. × sinensis There does exist a hybrid cross called a Meyer Lemon: Meyer lemon - Genus: Citrus Species: C. × ...


9

We get a lot of questions about member of the citrus family. Some varieties will flower and set fruit indoors. So, yes, you can grow citrus indoors but they are challenging to keep looking nice at the size of your plant without a greenhouse. is the pot the right size? This depends on whether it is pot bound or not. It sounds about right. This is part of ...


8

You may be right - the grafted part died back, the rootstock took over, and the only part that's left of the original grafted lemon is at the bottom. It shouldn't be thorny - the thorny parts will be off the rootstock, which might be sour lemon or some other citrus rootstock, hard to say, but growth off the stock might very well be thorny. If the leaves on ...


8

Looks like you have at least two problems. Let's take the last image first which appears to show Citrus Leaf Miner damage. You can see the channels that the miner has burrowed into the leaf. The other images show a plant under a lot of stress. The leaves show a lack of nutrients - the stem looks as though it was strong and healthy at one time, but then ...


7

I strongly suspect this is early infection with citrus leaf miner - the moth that causes this is an import from Asia and is now very active in the USA. There is evidence of leaf miner infestation in the second photograph, top leaf, to the left of the dead area in the leaf, which itself is probably where a former leafminer was present. That, coupled with the ...


7

Your seedling will eventually get lemons if the conditions are right. It could take 5-10 years. Since you are growing from seed, it is impossible to know whether the lemons you get from your tree will be anything like the lemon from which you got the seed.


6

That is a bad case of spider mites. Check the link to a similar question. The good news is that you can control the situation easily and safely with soap and water and a cloth. Mix up a solution of a teaspoon of dish soap to a quart of water and stir. Soak the cloth in the solution and wipe down every surface of the plant, top and bottom, stems, ...


6

Looks like a nitrogen deficiency as is seen here. There are no other signs of typical citrus problems such as iron manganese deficiency which gives dark veins and lighter leaf area. Some of this may be the soil mix. I see lots of shredded bark which, when combined with a moist soil, could be taking up nitrogen that the citrus roots would otherwise use. ...


6

It appears to be scale insects. I'm not experienced with scales, but I imagine you can use neem oil and/or diatomaceous earth once in a while to help. I would get the diatomaceous earth all over the stems, wherever they are. I hear you can put a circle of cinnamon or something around your pot to help deter ants.


6

The smaller the tree was the more likely it is to grow back. Trees put on new growth by activating dormant buds along the length of the trunk. The smaller the branch or trunk the more dense those buds are. Be sure to keep grass and weeds growing around the stump/stub cut back and let light get to the bark. Unfortunately no one can tell you for sure if your ...


6

It is lichen, yes - if it's only excessive on dead branches, that's why it's proliferating, because the wood is dead, although it does occur on live branches or trunks of trees as well, though not quite so enthusiastically. It won't be the cause of the dieback on some branches, it's just opportunistically decided to grow there. You may wish to prune out ...


5

First and foremost, the tree is getting way too much water. The soil must dry out between waterings. Water should be on a regular schedule so the roots can depend on it. For fertilizer, simply use a 15-15-15 fertilizer broadcast around the tree. I have had trees like this, and I now mulch around the tree and water once a month during the summer (I'm in So. ...


5

The answer seems to depend on the origin of the plants, what kind of lemon cultivar and the growing conditions. Lemons grown from seedlings are very slow to bear and will not necessarily bear lemons that can be used Commercially grown stock is very likely to have been grafted. Look for a difference in the trunk where the rootstock was joined to the top ...


5

Tree roots are genetically programmed to grow outwards, and downwards in a branching structure together with the tap root. This allows it to maximize the use of the usually infinite space available to it. If the roots hit an obstacle, they divert around it. If they hit air, as in a cliff face, they stop growing and signal the plant to send another root out ...


5

Roots branch by pruning just like the top of tree branches because of pruning. If you never prune the branches, they will tend to become long and lanky. Likewise with roots. Root pruning is what develops lots of fine 'feeder' roots close to the trunk. When the tree is young, you pop it out of the pot, and slice off the outer portions of the root 'ball'. ...


5

If you have green living material under the bark then it might not be dead. Lots of die back, yes. I recommend cutting it back hard to remove all dead leaves and minor stems. Then water and wait....


5

I think it is just over-watering. It takes some time for the plant to find its equilibrium again. Keep it dry and possibly on a cold and shadow place, to simulate winter, to let it restore the roots and the stem.


5

Citrus only need minimal pruning - if they are growing the way you want, I wouldn't worry. February is a good time to remove overcrowded branches and leggy growth can be cut back by up to two thirds. During the growing season, they can produce "water-shoots" - soft, fast growing shoots from woody material. Allowed to grow they will form leggy, unproductive ...


5

Who told you that a plant should get no light after being transplanted? Yes, it is probably not a good idea to put a freshly transplanted plant in direct sunlight outdoors, especially if its a small seedling without enough of a rootball. But if you place a plant in an effectively dark corner, you are submitting it to extra stress. Please put it back to its ...


5

Looking at this picture, to me it seems it may need more sunlight. It looks very "leggy", which indicates it's stretching to catch the light and wants more sun. But I'm impressed it's grown from seed that well! Also, you may want to rotate the pot, so it's leaning opposite to the light source. This will help it grow stronger. If you do give it more light, ...


4

No, they're not. Usually, people buy dwarf lemon tree varieties, but if they don't realise and just buy a non dwarf lemon, that'll reach 6 metres. They are rather slow growing though, and the dwarf varieties often produce suckers off the rootstock - left in situ, these will grow very rapidly and easily be taller than the tree itself rather quickly. The most ...


4

Scrape back the skin of the bark with your fingernail - do it near the base of the plant. If what's beneath is dry and brown, its dead - if there's any green or moisture, then it might recover - though not if you leave it sitting in water. UPDATED ANSWER: You've said it seems green inside and you've removed it from the standing water. It needs warm ...


4

The hope seems pretty small, especially if it's been like this for any length of time. No leaves, sitting in a saucer-full of water. Either it's been soddened to death or it was parched to death and the soddening is a belated attempt to compensate. In either case sodden is not good for anything that doesn't normally live in a bog. Moist is about as much ...


4

By the looks of your plant it is not yet old enough to produce fruit. If you started it from a seed, it could take up to 7 years to produce. If has been grafted 2-3 years is about normal.


4

I never thought I'd be saying this but that tree is DEAD. For all intent and purposes, no one barring magicians or a god could bring that guy back. Bummer for sure. Let's figure out what happened that you could learn from, watering schedule, a picture of the bottom of that trunk in the soil, and a larger view of the other plants nearby. The low cover ...


4

You have to post a picture but from what your questions states, sounds like OVER fertilization. No plant needs 'heavy nitrogen' and depending on the age of your lemon tree you certainly want lower N percentage in relation to the P and K! I've seen tiny little lemon tree twigs producing lemons. Nitrogen will produce lots of foliage and little, malformed ...


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