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4

In the summer, soybeans are usually my first choice, as they sprout and grow fast, and add about 30-50 lbs of nitrogen per acre. Red clover grows a little slower, but holds the soil together and adds about 70 lbs of nitrogen/acre in a year, if plowed under. Alfalfa and vetch are slower, but can add over 100 lbs Sometimes over 150 lbs) of nitrogen per acre in ...


3

Short question, short answer. Peanuts when harvested and stored properly can retain viability up to 3 years frozen, 1 year at room temperature. Longer viability correlates with low moisture content, as well. The viability will be enhanced if the seeds are stored in the pods, or treated with fungicide. For further reading, check out this article from Purdue (...


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Given that the genus for Amla (Phyllanthus) is not in the Fabaceae family, then it is not a legume. As your link shows, it is in the Phyllanthaceae, which is not a known nitrogen-fixing family.


2

Read the seed packets, they usually tell you length of time to harvest. Like 60-75 days, or something similar. Plan accordingly to when you want to harvest. I garden by planting new seeds every two weeks so something is always ready to pick. In the height of summer a lot of things won't grow well unless you are prepared to eat them as baby crops. Lots of ...


1

Brassicas are mostly cool season crops. In warm temperatures, they will try to go to seed before the next cool season. Transplanting for the later cool season is a great way to extend into the cooler temperatures. Some heirlooms/cultivars can handle the later planting season better than others. Some can't handle the late summer heat. For sowing, should be ...


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As I have made tofu itself I would not do this. Tofu is made from soaking soybeans and then grinding them into a fine slurry, cooking it for a while to extract any oils/proteins and then straining it through something fine to remove the bits of bean left over. At this point you have soymilk. To make Tofu then it is curdled with various substances (vinegar,...


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It could work, but it's not perfect. Wood ash has no nitrogen and sulphur and is rather low in phosphorus because much of it is lost during combustion. It is also extremely alkaline so you have to do some maths to avoid over-applying it, though dilution with lots of water and using the mixture to irrigate your garden after adding lots of organic matter ...


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There is no perfect soil, and so your recipe is not perfect. Plants have different requirements, also considering that crops (and vegetables) originates in different part of the world. Some vegetables doesn't like over-fertilized soil, or better: vegetables like it, but not you. [you want to harvest fruits and vegetables, not to create the most vigorous ...


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