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Shortly after I asked the question, the state of the plant quickly deteriorated. I cut a couple of the obviously dead leaves and then tried to keep the plant moist and somewhat in light. I did notice that the soil started to smell moldy so did some inspection of the roots - well the patient is dead. So from what I learned in the meantime: Freezing a plant ...


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Do you still have this plant?? I have a Ctenanthe and it had similar symptoms to yours. The soil got pretty dry a couple weeks ago, I noticed the leaves start curling. At that point I watered it and the leaves uncurled however a few leaves were turning yellow at the bottom. So I watered it again about 5 days later and after that I noticed EVEN MORE leaves ...


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It looks like mechanical damage, where something has punctured the surface of the leaf, a few cells have died and bled sap in that area then dried up and left the mark. A nibble by a curious cat, a brush-by when the leaf was young and fragile, a knock while transplanting, many causes are possible. The plant looks healthy, and the vulnerable points on the ...


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Your succulent looks quite normal for a mature plant. The leaves are plump, fat and healthy, showing some of the dusty bloom that they use to protect themselves from intense sunlight. The reddish tips are also normal for a high light plant, and the fact that a pup has appeared and some outside leaves are dying off indicates that its interior chemistry is ...


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There is evidence of white fungal growth on one or two leaves, possibly mildew; you can spray with a fungicide or try baking soda mixed with horticultural oil, see this link White Mold in Succulents. In the meantime, try to improve air flow round the plant - check any other succulent plants you have indoors and separate it away from those if they are not ...


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The issue of drainage is very important, not necessarily that water flows out the bottom but that air is pulled in at the top. Some plants can tolerate being wet for a while, but very few roots can survive without air, either present in the irrigation water or allowed to flow through the compost. Kalanchoe is not a plant that can tolerate wet roots. When we ...


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One reason for this is a fungus infection called "damping off". This happens when the soil surface is too cool for rapid germination and also harbours a lot of fungal spores. The slow growth of the seedlings allows the fungal spores to penetrate the stem tissues and cut them off at soil level. To eliminate this possibility ensure that you do not ...


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This appears to be Thrip damage. Thrips are very active fliers and can travel long distances on the wind, do their damage and move on. They make puncture marks on leaves which immediately are not very visible but later when the marks are numerous and result in dead discoloured cells the damage is suddenly apparent. Thrips are known to be a pest on Iochroma. ...


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Is there any draining system in the pot? If not, then over watering might have done the harm. Whatever it is we will never know. Also I would like to ask the age of your plant. Tulsi can die anytime between 1.5 years to 3 years. At least in my place I have seen so, but obviously after flowering and producing seeds. Now, coming back to your question, are the ...


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It sounds like the cutting has come from the wrong part of the tree and may not work as a cutting to develop a new plant. When a fruit tree grows it produces two types of wood, vegetative and flower/fruit producing. Distinguishing signs vary, but for many trees the vegetative buds are long and pointy and the flowering buds are squat, fat and blunt. Once cut, ...


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They seems quite healthy to me. Newly grown young leaves of mango trees are purple or brown. The petiole of the young leaves are not strong enough to bear the weight of the leaves hence they are drooped down. When they mature, they will become strong, deep green and they will become like other leaves beneath them. No need to worry about it. You will get ...


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When I was dealing with these plants on a regular basis they were called Dracaena demerensis cultivar Janet Craig. Botanists have been busy and this is now classified as Dracaena massangea. This plant is native to tropical Africa and will not stand below zero temperatures. The leaves are dead and should be removed. The stems and roots may be dead but it's ...


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In my experience avocados tend to grow in spurts; they have rest or quiet periods and then suddenly decide to make a rush for growth, sending up little new leaves at the growing point which suddenly overnight it seems expand into big leaves and then just sit there for a while before making a repeat performance. Avocados grow all over the Caribbean in full ...


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