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1

The issue looks to me like the fungal disease apple scab. Your confirmation that the weather has been wet and cool helps to confirm it, and the tree's position in the corner of a tall fence helps to exacerbate the problem due to much-reduced airflow in and around the tree. The tree could also use a good pruning in its interior to improve airflow by opening ...


2

Right in the corner of the yard is a nice location for annuals or perennial plants, but not a great location for a tree. Try to imagine the tree in 10 years time, it will want to spread out and will overhang quite a bit the other side of the fence. Roots will spread in a circle, running under the fence to who knows what on the other side. We can see for ...


0

The white chalky substance is either pesticide residue or hard water deposits from overhead watering at the grower. Neither of these harm the plant. Your test would be getting a damp cloth and wiping the fronds. It should wipe off and not return. A no risk solution is making a solution of dish soap and water and wiping the top and bottom of each frond. ...


0

I got similar thing on my cowpea after moved outside. I think that they are bitten by slugs or snails, it's real plague and they are going to eat everything. Stems are bitten, but not completly, so they turn over


1

Since I never got a response to this, I had to figure it out on my own. The answer turned out to be Chlorosis. The bean plants weren't getting enough iron, because the pH of the soil was too high (alkaline). After several rounds of soil testing, adding a bunch of chelated iron to the soil, and several acidifiers, I brought them back to health.


3

Bonsai projects are great! I have many running at the moment too. Also some oak, but mine are branching already... I see a few problems here. First of all, this tree (plant) needs to grow outdoors, not indoors. It needs sun, rain, and wind, but most important cold winters as well. It needs to lose its leaves in winter. Branching occurs very often in spring ...


1

All looks normal to me, no real sign of disease or pests, might just be a variety characteristic. I have Georgia Jets which do not show any wrinkling. Check under the leaves and if nothing I would say not to be concerned.


3

You are right, it would appear to be Acer campestre, the field maple. Given where you are, I suspect the explanation is not the very wet weather we had during May, but the very dry and warm 6 weeks or so that preceded it. It's a tree that's been planted less than a year, and for the first two years, it will need copious watering during dry spells,especially ...


2

It is Hydrangea macrophylla, one of the lace cap varieties rather than a 'mophead' type. They are deciduous and prefer partial or dappled shade in soil that does not dry out frequently, and need plenty of space because, as you mention, they get rather large over time. They should not be hard pruned or pruned at all if possible, with only dead wood removed in ...


0

that is a soil issue. you need to remove it and make a soil that is a 50/50 mix of peat and perlite and also add some sand to the mix. that soil looks very compact and the roots cant breathe which is slowly killing the plant. also it is too young to get full direct sun.


1

We can apply general scientific principles to get more information that will help explain what might have happened. It's just a matter of collecting details that help build the most plausible narrative. We know the general process for trees to wake from winter dormancy - in particular maples, where in the previous year carbohydrates are stored in the trunk ...


1

I know grapefruit trees that don't get proper light and/or water will sometimes shed their leaves and regrow them (especially if conditions improve); not sure about lemons, but probably. My advice is to give it more light. Put it by a window or something. My grapefruit tree hasn't lost its leaves since I put it in my bedroom, years ago (maybe in 2014 or 2015;...


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When you water your tomato plants, try not to get the leaves wet. Fuzzy-leaves plants like tomatoes have hairs on the leaves that will catch and hold droplets of water. The droplets can focus the sunlight (like a magnifying glass) and cause leaf damage. I can't say for certain that's your issue, but it would be consistent with the size of the damaged spots.


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