Hot answers tagged

4

Yeah looks perfectly normal. I have some little oaks too, the first leaves always start off a bit red-brownish. You will see when they unfold at normal size they become green. No worries, they will do!


4

You've posted a very good image from which it's easy to see this is a Ligurian Leafhopper. The black dots are likely frass (the insect's poo) and they feed by sucking the sap from the leaves and stems of the host plant, image and information here http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/VEG/LEAF/Ligurian_leafhopper.HTM They will happily use mint as a host plant, ...


3

The cotyledon (the first leaf like green) will wilt and fade with time. That should be expected. That being said the other leaves are showing stress. There may more than one factor that is stressing it. One it's the wrong time of the year. If you are in the Northern Hemisphere it is early for sunflowers to start to grow. It may be the temperatures ...


3

First, the individual leaves will not grow back. The plant in its entirety will continue to grow, and new growth will appear, in various places: At the tips of the existing stems, in pairs, effectively making the stems longer. In the axils, i.e. where a leaf is connected to a stem. This will happen when the tip of a stem is cut off. New shots from the roots ...


3

I would hazard an educated guess that you are over fertilizing the plant. Vitax Clematis feed is a slow release formulation, and lasts for 3 months. Feeding with Tomorite monthly as well is somewhat of an overkill, so I suggest you stop using the Tomorite and don't feed at all again this year, not even with the Vitax. Keep the plant well watered to try to ...


3

Those appear to be aphids, although the resolution of the photo leaves them a bit blurry under magnification. That would also explain the ants, since aphids secrete a sugar-like syrup known as honeydew which the ants like. It's probably easiest to remove them by hand, unless you have a lot of infected plants. You could also use insecticidal soap, but make ...


2

One cause of purple leaf discoloration is phosphorous deficiency. This can be aggravated by low temperatures, which might explain why it has started recently (depending where in the world you are gardening, of course). The purple colour is the result of the plant being unable to producing enough green chlorophyll. Without chlorophyll, many plants would be ...


2

The stippling appears to be spider mite. Look for small webbing under the leaves. I really can't tell from your pictures if this is definitely the problem, but it is my best educated guess. IF you do find spider mite webbing, move it away from the rest of your plants. Give it a a really good washing, spraying off the bottom and top of each leave with ...


2

Google tells me that 'sopalin' means kitchen paper or kitchen paper roll. No, don't use that, its too rough. The best thing to use is either a paintbrush (specially a larger paint brush of the type that children might use to do a painting) or a blusher brush, or any type of brush used for make up for the face. I suppose an ordinary paintbrush intended to ...


2

The best and greenest option is to compost them yourself, on your property. Otherwise, if you have a wooded area where the leaves fall and nothing else is planted there, it's fine to just leave them where they are and let them gradually rot down back into the soil, as it does in forests. However, if your trees are underplanted or have lawn around them, you ...


2

The visible signs here are indicative of a canker disease; the infection enters through a wound on branches, perhaps high in the tree, which contaminates the sap transporting tissues in the tree. These tissues become unable to feed nutritious sap to these branches which quickly dry out and the infection rapidly works its way lower, inside the tree, towards ...


2

Never heard this called Ocean plant before, the usual common name is spider plant, though its botanical name is Chlorophytum comosum. The 'spider babies' are formed after flowering - yours just hasn't produced any yet, but may do so in the next few months as the plant matures a bit. They do best in bright daylight (not direct sun) so ensure your plant is ...


2

Now is not the time for gardening in the UK, but now IS the time for removing the old fence and putting in new fencing, removing the shed (if you want it removed and I think you do) and work out where you want a patio and a new shed. Don't worry about the lawn for the time being, ignore it; it looks like it needs replacing anyway, so that's best done in ...


2

Andrew, I agree with Bamboo, the problem is not that a leaf is touching soil. There are a couple of hints in your photos to suggest over-watering. Looking at the damage on the first and second photo, there seems to be some spongy cell degradation, prior to browning. This kind of leaf damage is typical of plants that have been sitting wet, with insufficient ...


2

I wouldn't worry about pruning off the leaf - the problem is likely that the plant is growing indoors - it needs to be outside. I don't know what your outdoor temperatures are like currently, but (assuming it's not bitterly cold) it's probably best to harden it off over a period of a week or so by leaving it out during the middle of the day for about 3/4 ...


2

Sometimes it is quite difficult to move plants without causing some distress to the balance of the plant by damaging the roots. Ideally the pot will be full of roots so that when the plant is turned out the root ball stays intact and goes right into the perfect hole in the ground and the shock is minimal. More frequently the root ball is loose and it comes ...


2

Don't over-think things. I successfully grew a Clementine from seed and kept it for years until it got too large and ugly. In the winter, I generally ignored it (I live in Wisconsin, so it's "winter" something like 7 months of the year). I would put it outside in mid-May - in the shade - and bring it in again in late September. Every time I moved it, it lost ...


2

It sounds like you're saying you split the plant's roots in order to pot up parts separately. Unless the palm was very large and broad across the base, with several strongly growing major stems, and you then carefully separated out the strong stems with strong root growth attached to each, this was not a good idea. Information here on whether and when to ...


2

I think it looks like damage from too much direct sunlight. Orchids love lots of bright, but indirect sunlight. Tropical Orchid's natural habitat is the jungle floor, where they get lots of dappled, but little direct sunlight through the tree canopy. The best way to add shade for orchids getting light from a south or west facing window is is to hang a sheer ...


2

This will be a good news contribution. As far as we know, fireblight is not present in Australia. Fireblight would usually present itself as completely dried out twigs in spring during blossom time and in spots in the tree where it entered, not over the whole tree at the same time unless you missed it a few months ago. Watch carefully as the leaves fall; if ...


2

The RHS has an interesting note on nutrient deficiency. Note particularly the comment on magnesium where it indicates that lack of this nutrient in the plant can cause browning of the leaves, but more important that too much potassium can prevent uptake of magnesium. There may be a good amount of Mg. in the feed but if it gets blocked then strange things can ...


2

The problem is you are watering them every day. You should only water plants when they need watering, not on any kind of schedule. As a general rule, you should water plants when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch. You have to be extra careful with seedlings because excess moisture can often cause damping off disease. Damping off disease is a fungus ...


2

You can plant them outside if you have a space for them, but you need to harden them off first, by placing outside during the day for 2 or 3 hours the first day, increasing the time you leave them out over a week or so, until they're out all night (preferably a milder night). After that, they can be planted in the ground. If you want to keep them in pots (...


2

I have the same problems on my Meyer lemon tree. The deformities are caused by the Asian citrus psyllid. They are little grey bugs that suck on the new leaves. Whenever the bug feeds, it releases a toxin that causes the leave to curl. You can read more about them here. The easiest way to get rid of them is to either hand pick them off or use an insecticide, ...


2

Don't know for sure, but you might want to do a search for clematis leaf miner.


2

It looks like an Imperial Red Philodendron. It is supposed to produce the reddish leaves. As a general rule, water plants when the top inch of soil feels dry to the touch. Unnecessary re-potting is a main cause of plant failure. You should only re-pot a plant if it is root-bound (although some plants like to be root-bound). A couple of good signs of a plant ...


2

how often do you water your orchid? and do you use fertilizer? Depending on temperature/humidity/and size of your plant you can water your orchid once every 2-3 weeks (water once a week if your pot is small or you feel the medium is dry out. I water mine once every 3 week but I live in temperature max ~86F). Place the orchid under running water until ...


2

This is usually a sign that it needs more water. It can be that due to the weather the plants suddenly need more water than usual, or they want more water because the plants are bigger than before. The plants look further healthy! A lot of unripe tomatoes already, and new flowers. Good luck!


2

Inspect the leaves closely with a magnifying glass - I'm seeing what might be remains of webbing and even what might be a small, pale caterpillar, first picture, on the large, browning leaf. Check the undersides too - if what I think I can see is right, you may have had a light infestation of moth larvae, but likely most have turned into moths now and left......


2

The common varieties of onions (Allium cepa) are biennials. In the first year they produce a bulb which survives the winter, and in the second year they flower and die. Of course when they are grown as vegetables the bulbs are harvested and eaten at the end of the first year. The growth cycle is controlled by day length. Bulb formation starts when the day ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible