10

I don't think those are eggs. I think they are aphids. Put your gloves on and squish them. It will be easiest, and little is in fact lost, to just remove heavily infested tissue, such as the leaf you show; crush it as you discard it. A jet from your garden hose will usually remedy problems before they become serious if you just make a habit of 'blasting' ...


9

The wood at the bottom of the bed looks pretty dark in comparison to the rest of the side. It's most likely that the woodlice are feeding off a decaying box, rather than anything in the bed. They'll only be recycling nutrients from the wood into the bed. They'll cause very little damage if any, mainly to soft fruit or seedling. If anything, they're highly ...


9

There are two possible problems that could come from using manure on root vegetables, one of which only applies to fresh manure and the other is more applicable to fresh manure also. The first, and the most obvious, is the potential for contamination. If you're putting the manure into the soil, the part of the vegetable you eat is growing in direct contact ...


9

There is a big difference between manure from ruminants (e.g. cows) and non-ruminants (e.g. horses, chickens, etc). Non-ruminant herbivores produce poo which is relatively bulky and contains a lot of undigested plant material. This material is degraded rather quickly by bacteria, but until that happens the manure is traditionally described as "hot", and ...


8

Your idea of green manure in winter is a good one, beans help put some nitrogen back into the soil. Otherwise the most simple rule for rotation is to leave it a while between plantings of things in the same family. Some do yearly rotation, some do seasonal. I just have 2 beds for veggies, so my rotation this year looks something like this, I've also included ...


8

Just wash them all in clean tapwater - the hardest are the leafy greens, so the way to do that is immersion in a sink full of water, then picking out the leaves and running them directly under the tap, at the same time as inspecting for eggs and caterpillars. Then a salad spinner if you've got one, or just leave them to drain down in a colander. You may need ...


7

If you subscribe to the hygiene hypothesis, then there's no need to wash anything. If you're not keen on eating insects and eggs, then a good immersion in warm salty water removes insects, and inspection is needed to remove eggs. Insects are a good source of vitamin B12 for those who are strict vegetarians.


7

If you ask yourself what wegetable you should grow at a given time, you should use a seasonality table like this one. This kind of document can help you to chose and optimize your cultures by planning at month scale every phase of your cultivated vegetables. Find a similar document at a local gardening store to be sure it is suitable to your location. To ...


6

Congratulations, the taller plants you have are Lambsquarter plants. Considered a weed by everyone I've ever met and it sets up to 75,000 seeds per plant. I suggest killing it with extreme prejudice. From comments it appears that Lambsquarter is in fact edible and grown by at least a few people as food. It is a fast growing plant, in garden soil it will ...


6

You can get the average last frost date for your area from various sources, such as this one from UC Ag Extension, or one I cannot seem to find for your area from the National Weather Service. What that means in any given year is somewhat variable. If you also keep your own records you can in some cases infer patterns from the relationship of the published ...


6

I guess you can do it as for other varieties? http://seedworld.com/cross-pollination-8/ Cover the flower heads. This technique (also known as "bagging") will need to be done before the flowers open so that bees and any other pollen transporting insects are preventing from getting to them. For covering the flowers only, try such items as: Toilet ...


6

For pathogen concerns, stock/standard advice often enshrined in regulations is "not less than 120 days before harvest." So if you are adding fresh steer poop (which you should not, in most cases) do so a minimum of 4 months before your planned harvest date. As an instance where you might actually do this, consider the "compost in place" approach where you'd ...


5

The "cabbage worm" which is really a caterpillar of the cabbage moth is best prevented by preventing the moth from accessing the plant - hoops of floating row cover are commonly deployed over cabbage-family plants (such as broccoli and kale) to provide this protection. Once they are present, the most common "generally considered environmentally safe" ...


5

A good rule of thumb for Kale harvesting (and other plants) is to freely take any leaf that is losing a third of its sunlight to new growth. If you're harvesting for personal use, don't worry about the "days to maturity" bit. Growing Kale to full maturity in the spring/summer takes a slightly pro touch, as it's vulnerable to a variety of pests. Get the ...


5

It's best to harvest kale after it's been through a frost. Like most leafy vegetables you can harvest 20% of the leaves for eating, and let the remainder keep growing. At my local farmers market, they sell kale leaves. So, they just harvest the outer leaves for sale. And then these leaves are about 2 feet in length, but a home grower might not get this ...


5

Root vegetables should be just as fine as any other root plant in my mind. They will take in those nutrients and everything like any other. I say they will be fine and that is that. Maybe they were talking about fresh manure, which would burn the plant/root.


5

In my experience, this kind of hole is often caused by slugs. Slugs stay hidden during the sunlight period and pop out during wet night and rainy days, making them difficult to spot. Note that it can be caterpillar, thumbtack (not sure of this translation) or even birds. For identifing the "pest", watch for your plants patiently and minutely. To fight the ...


5

It is a Swiss chard. Just it had too much stress (cold?) so too many gems are awakes quickly, and they started to produce leaves. I would possibly expect also that the chard will start the second-year cycle, so start to flowering. Sometime it just happen. I don't know why, but Swiss chards are particular prone to this (other vegetables just die or remain ...


5

This is not swiss chard. This is Tatsoi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tatsoi The chard seed looks completely different than the brassica family seed of tatsoi. Tatsoi seed would look identical to the butter lettuce seed. The holes in the plant look like cabbage worms. The picture with the dark poop at the base reinforces my hypothesis. You can pick ...


5

I'm not 100% sure because the black parts are blurry, but your "mold" looks suspiciously like aphids. I think I can see at least one specimen that's clear enough to see the legs (in the 2nd picture). And that's a frequent kind of unwelcome visitor on spinach. Please look closely and check whether the black spots are in fact small insects. A magnifying lens ...


4

Arugula seeds are found in seed pods, which should be left on the plant until dry and then removed. If left on the plant for too long after drying the pods will crack and disperse the seeds, so you will need to keep a close eye on them.


4

It could easily be slugs; to find out you need to catch them. Go out after dark with a flashlight and look at the leaves, especially on nights after rain or when it is a bit moist. If that is the problem crushed eggshells spread around the plants will help.


4

Cover the plants with lightweight fabric or row covers, and hand pollinate them yourself. It's a lot of work, and keep in mind that brassicas are biennial so you'll have to wait until year 2 to get flowers and seeds. Also be forewarned that most of the brassicas are really large and ugly when they set seeds. I did this with kale one year and I won't do it ...


4

That looks like caterpillar damage to me. You can sometimes spot and remove the caterpillars at night, or else a spray with Bt (Safer brand "caterpillar spray") is a safe and organic way to kill them.


4

Lettuce seeds show "high-temperature inhibition", or, plainly put, won't germinate at temperatures over 85 °F / 30 °C. Considering the fact that they are native to the Mediterranean, that's a wise mechanism: summers tend to be dry there and the seeds would be at risk of drying quickly. While they will germinate between 40 and 85 °F / 5 and 30 &...


4

It sounds like you should be fine. Worm casings are fine, as is, and if the fish-based fertilizer is sold as a fertilizer, read the instructions. If the instructions call for adding it to growing plants, and not just as a soil amendment that has to break down, then it will be fine. The place where you have concerns is when you are adding stronger soil ...


3

Depending on the zone you are raising Kale the main sign that that Kale plant will stop producing is when it flowers/produces seed. Bolts...keep those flowers off that plant, use higher nitrogen when fertilizing and it should last most of the season. It is an annual normally. An annual has only ONE purpose in life and that is to make seeds, babies. You ...


3

As you say, planting calendars are highly localised as even in a smallish area there may exist microclimates. What you are looking for in San Francisco can be found here http://smsf-mastergardeners.ucanr.edu/Vegetable_Schedule_for_San_Francisco_-_San_Mateo_Counties/ I use this one for NZ http://www.gardengrow.co.nz/ so everyone needs to search for the one ...


2

Well soaking seed can help the germination rate of just about anything when the seeds won't get lost or gummed up in the water, but it's also usually not necessary unless you have old seeds and you need maximum output. You can also soak seeds between the folds of a wet paper towel and you can measure your germination rate by planting 10 seeds in the paper ...


2

The leaves turning red in fall is simply the chlorophyll decaying, and in some cases sugars build up and can make a red color. You lose some nutrition, but it shouldn't become unsafe.


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