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3

The tree in the centre of the photo looks suspiciously like a beech to me. Here's a quote from the Woodland Trust you may want to ponder: Beech woodland is shady and characterised by a dense carpet of fallen leaves and mast husks which prevent most woodland plants from growing. Only specialist shade-tolerant plants can survive beneath a beech canopy. You ...


0

There are a few grasses that stand head and shoulders above the others when in a grass plot, among them are barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli) and orchard grass (Dactylis glomerata), both widely distributed over the earth surface. Examine the base of the main grass shoots - if flattened then it is orchard grass. Barnyard grass is vigorous and will ...


4

Your grass is under threat from at least 3 sources: the people that use it directly, people who do not use it directly but nevertheless have power to make your life more difficult, and the weather. The weather/climate will make the grass too wet, too dry, too shady, too bright, too hot, too cold and so on. So the best kind of grass is a mix of grasses and ...


7

You need to buy sports grade grass seed - this is the most hardwearing mix of seeds. Where there are large bare areas, you will need to cordon those off to keep the children out until it's grown - smaller areas will just have to take their chances. The problem with growing from seed is that,technically, it will not be able to withstand normal use (especially ...


4

Yes, everything that Peter4075 said - I've often cut grass in mid January here in the south of England if it needed it and the grass wasn't waterlogged or frosted. We have a variable climate where it's possible that Christmas Day can be warmer than a day in June, so grass cutting isn't really an 'only in spring and summer job' here. Keep the blades set high ...


5

As long as the ground isn't so wet that you will churn it up or damage it, if the grass is long then by all means start cutting your grass. Here in Essex, I today cut the grass at my one remaining garden maintenance contract (I retire next year).


2

You can use whatever you like for edging round the lawn, from bricks to a plastic lawn edge, but the grass will still grow over the top. For a sharp edge ongoing, use the lawn edger in spring (sometimes necessary again in autumn if it butts up against paving) and then just use the long handled lawn edging shears (where the blades are sideways on) whenever ...


2

A few comments: You need a half moon edger such as this one here and long handled shears like here. Your border soil looks a bit lumpy and weedy. Maintaining a decent edge is a lot easier if the adjacent soil is a reasonably fine tilth - ideally it should look like it's just been poured out of a bag of premium topsoil :-) If it was me, I'd regularly spot ...


10

There is no one "right way" to create and maintain a crisp lawn edge. When I was much younger than I am now, I did exactly what you are doing, except I used a flat spade to cut the edge and a trowel to clean it up. I did do one thing differently: I removed all grass cut from the edge from the garden, after knocking the soil off - it tends to root ...


2

Farmers have been dealing with the problem of stones and chunks of debris in fields for centuries. Mostly the problem presents problems for tools - breakage, wear and so on that slow production down at a busy time of year. It is counter productive to go looking for such problems which are more often dealt with as and when they appear on the surface by hand/...


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