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No, a typical weed and feed product will not be safe on newly germinated grass. For example, the label for Scotts Turf Builder Weed & Feed (active ingredients: 2,4-D and mecoprop-p) says, Delay application on newly seeded, sodded or sprigged areas until new grass has been mowed 4 times. The label for BioAdvanced 5-In-1 (active ingredients: 2,4-D, ...


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Information from Google is essentially worthless, unless you've discovered a reputable source. For lawn questions, I like to use The Lawn Institute, a science-based organization committed to providing information on lawns and lawncare. Here's a link to their Lawn Diseases page. Note that there is information about cultural control (which is what you're ...


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An established lawn is way more tolerant of suboptimal watering than new seed will be. So you should focus on giving the new grass seed what it needs. Personally, I don't even worry about it. I overseed my cool-season lawn mid-spring and early fall, when things aren't too dry but still warm enough to encourage the seed to germinate. But, if you want to give ...


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You don't. Push mowers are very finicky about height of grass. You must cut much more often than power mowers. Why is that? Because a reel mower gets its cutting energy from the rotation of the wheels. That depends on wheel traction in grass (itself quite limited). There is an absolute maximum amount of "energy per linear inch" that can be ...


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It would be best to dig those grasses out - the other option is to slash into them deeply with a sharp knife and keep repeating that, which eventually should kill them off, but it will take a fairly long time, delaying when you can sow your seed.


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Reel mowers (known as cylinder mowers in the UK) do a very good job of cutting proper lawn grasses which have not been left to get too long, but they are renowned for one problem - they will not cut through longer, flowering stems or taller clumps of thicker stemmed grasses, all they usually do is flatten them. The grasses you have a problem with don't ...


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The only easy option you have is to put bigger wheels on it to bring up the blade height.


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Why don't weeds benefit from the fertilizer? They could, depending on the weed. But the grass benefits more. Most weeds are opportunistic. They germinate and flourish where the grass is thin or absent. If one keeps the grass healthy, which includes watering, fertilizing, and not cutting it too short, the grass will fill in and shade weeds and their seeds, ...


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