7

You need to buy sports grade grass seed - this is the most hardwearing mix of seeds. Where there are large bare areas, you will need to cordon those off to keep the children out until it's grown - smaller areas will just have to take their chances. The problem with growing from seed is that,technically, it will not be able to withstand normal use (especially ...


4

I'd pull the weeds now but would still expect them to return in full vigor in the spring because they've more than likely gone to seed before they died. True story - I deadhead my weeds (especially dandelions, plantain. and chickweed) if I don't have time to pull them - this definitely reduces weed seedlings the next year. And yes. a couple of my neighbors ...


4

Your grass is under threat from at least 3 sources: the people that use it directly, people who do not use it directly but nevertheless have power to make your life more difficult, and the weather. The weather/climate will make the grass too wet, too dry, too shady, too bright, too hot, too cold and so on. So the best kind of grass is a mix of grasses and ...


3

The tree in the centre of the photo looks suspiciously like a beech to me. Here's a quote from the Woodland Trust you may want to ponder: Beech woodland is shady and characterised by a dense carpet of fallen leaves and mast husks which prevent most woodland plants from growing. Only specialist shade-tolerant plants can survive beneath a beech canopy. You ...


3

Depends on what you want to grow and how fast you want it to grow. The most noticeable item is the alkaline pH of 7.8 : most plants are best near neutral ( pH 7) or slightly acidic. That is why gypsum and peat moss were recommended ; both tend to make soil less alkaline / more acid ; good recommendations. If you are growing grass you need some nitrogen ; I ...


3

I have buried chicken wire under my lawn close to the back fence. This is in South West England. We had a problem with rats burrowing under the fence and coming up near the bird feeder. They would then take seeds, peanuts and suet back down their burrow to, presumably, their nest. We tried several ways of stopping them, obviously worried that the rats ...


2

Another philosopy to consider is that one person's weedy lawn is another person's wildflower meadow. Instead of expending money, effort and chemicals on getting rid of "weeds", regard the "weeds" as wild flowers and manage your lawn as a meadow. At its most basic, this involves regularly mowing a network of grassy paths and cutting the ...


2

I just placed poultry netting under my front yard before we laid sod. Our Giant Schnauzer and Airedale had previously dug it to pieces. It was their favorite area and they truly tore it up. They have not even attempted to dig in it since, which is miraculous. The grass and plants don't seem to do so very well, though. Wondering if it might be a high zinc ...


2

According to The Lawn Institute (specifically, this page), cool season grasses should be mowed at anywhere from one to four inches. This includes perennial ryegrass. The growth rate you describe sounds more like annual ryegrass to me. This grass is often included in less-expensive grass seed mixes because it sprouts very quickly, providing 'instant green&...


1

Any tricks people use to seed large areas without inground irrigation systems? I don't know that there would be any trick per se. Ultimately, there's a certain amount of water you need to get onto the lawn, and it takes a certain amount of work to accomplish that. You're already doing the easiest thing: pick the right time to seed. Early spring or early ...


1

Based on the added photo of the plant with roots, you have a bunchgrass but not perennial ryegrass. The fact that the base of the stems are not purple shows that this is not a perennial ryegrass (that's a key marker for the species). Based on some random photos I've been looking at, I would guess that it's annual ryegrass, which explains its growth habit (it'...


1

Rake with an iron rake ( not a spring type ), you want to pull grass leaves up to the surface. I put 1 to 2 inches of sand in the back yard and it worked well . I have St Augustine which can be put in with plugs so it may have tolerated it better than some other grasses.


1

The main problem is there is no value for nitrogen... so without nitrogen, it's difficult to reconmand a fertilizer to fix your soil. so far we know that your dirt is low on phosphorous and potassium..... that is probably why store recomand 13-13-13 fertilizer, it's a safe bet that would fix the low phosphorous and potassium but it might lead to adding too ...


1

Well, you certainly don't need gypsum. Gypsum is calcium sulfate, and your calcium is already very, very high. Your phosphorus is low. Your sulfur looks very low, though. Adding some sulfur would help to acidify the soil further (your pH is a bit high). Sulfur is usually what people use to acidify soil. It takes a while for it to work, though. Plants also ...


1

The crabgrass makes your situation a little harder to deal with, since the easiest way to prevent them (by applying a pre-emergent herbicide in the spring) will also prevent grass seed from sprouting). The other weeds are less of a problem. For the crabgrass patches, I recommend that you: Do not use a mulching mower on those patches until you finish step 2. ...


1

I take it you did not read the label on the Roundup Path Weedkiller, which states quite clearly 'do not use on lawns'...so that's the first lesson, read labels and instructions! Unfortunately, now that you have used it, you will need to wait at least 4 weeks to make repairs to the lawn where the bare patches are. And a word about glyphosate (particularly ...


1

It's best to get a bag of topsoil and fill in the area with that, tamp it down and level off, ensuring it is flush everywhere it abuts the existing turf, and sow seed. The drawback is you can't walk on that area other than very lightly occasionally for 6 weeks; it's three months for normal use (frequently walking on it or running around on or laying on it) ...


1

You have several options, and they depend on your specific scenario, capabilities, free time, resources and budget. While dealing with this situation on my property I choose to utilize my yard waste and recycle cans and load them up weekly with the debris and ruined soil. This was very time consuming and took a lot of physical labor, but it was relatively ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible