16

Rollover is, indeed, the major concern. And it's one that kills a number of people each year, all of whom were probably just as sure as you are that it wouldn't happen to them... Don't be a statistic. If the maker of your mower recommends mowing up and down the slope, it's for a reason.


15

I suspect the guidance came from a time of reel mowers, which do actually push the blades of grass over in the same direction. (I use a reel mower to maintain our acre and a half.) As you've pointed out, with a rotary mower there is a lot more randomness involved. That said, if you mowed your lawn with the exact same path every time, you would probably ...


11

Theory says that changing up the mowing pattern will keep the grass from always bending in the same direction. Another reason I've heard stated is that it keeps wheel ruts from forming. I might buy the latter but the former's probably not a real problem. Grass tends to want to grow where it wants to grow, generally upward towards the sun. Maybe running ...


8

I think you are just suffering from mowing a pasture for the first time. Once you've got it all cut for the first time it will go much faster to keep it cut. However you don't want to use a flail to keep the grass down, use a regular blades lawn mower. It will do a neater job. A flail is for knocking down tall stuff and shrubbery but not for "lawn mowing". ...


7

@Kate Gregory has a good point about reel mowers, but a rotational mower won't have the same problems. I don't buy the "direction of cut" argument, and here's why: The blades aren't moving the same direction you are. If you compare the mower blade to a helicopter, the blade is retreating faster than you're moving forward. Depending on the location under ...


7

In theory, yes, but the usual problem encountered is slipping and skidding on the grass as you push it along, often causing muddy slicks to appear. At worst, pushing it along might make grooves in wet soil, but if the grass isn't that long, it shouldn't be a problem. That's assuming that what you guys call a reel mower is what we in the UK call a push along ...


7

Working in Landscape Maintenance in the Northwest US with lots and lots of rain, well, rain and wet couldn't come between my crews and their routes. We used hydro static gas mowers for traction more than anything. Mowers that aren't hydro static will spin their wheels and dig up/ruin the grass. A reel mower would be less intrusive to the environment being ...


6

String trimmers tend to leave the cut edges of grass rough and ragged, which is unsightly as well as not good for the grass plants. The strings on the trimmer are also generally not good for more than just a few yards of heavy cutting before they become weak and start to break off, requiring more string be let out of the reel to continue working. This can ...


6

The reason is potential for roll-over like Fiasco and Ecnerwal say. Perhaps you should invest in a used smaller hydraulic walk-behind mower. That is what professionals do. Match the mower to the job. You can find them almost free. Slopes are tricky to mow properly, have you considered making the sloped area into a planting bed? Lawns should be mowed ...


6

Looks like it should be the carburetor bowl (where fuel is metered in by a float valve to be available to get sucked into the carburetor jets - either of which can get clogged if you did't drain the fuel before storage or run a fuel stabilizer before storage - and sometimes even if you did.)


6

We've been trying to hammer the solution to this issue to our customers since B&S & many other manufacturers, switched to their aerodynamically shaped fuel tanks for esthetic-reasons, mainly to match the new OHV engine styles. In doing so they knowingly created a nightmare for owners of same equipment. These tanks have a domed-like top, & ...


6

I don't have too much experience (none with robot mowers) but I think same 'rules' apply to any type of mower: Avoid mowing when grass is wet - this applies to early morning when there is dew (or after rain). Mowed wet grass is sticky and will probably pile up inside you mower. Also, the hottest time of day is not good time because your grass it trying to ...


5

Depends on the mower you're using - if its just an ordinary electric hover mower with a rotary blade, or a non hover with a rotor blade, you just buy a new blade when its blunt or damaged, unless you want to put it in for a service every year, when they might do it if it needs it. If you can find someone to sharpen it, or you can do it yourself, fine, but in ...


5

It depends on a lot of factors but for rotary mowers, every 20 to 25 hours is a good interval to sharpen your blades. For some people that means once a year, for others twice a year. For commercial landscapers it's once or more a week. You can also just look at the blades of grass the next day or so after mowing. If the tips have a large (1/4" or so) ragged ...


5

Yes, you should clean it after mowing. You really need a lawnmower cleaning brush, a narrow one that gets between the blades to take off anything lurking there, and for a general scrub down of dirty parts. You could hose it down if you wanted, but you'd need to dry it off before oiling and storing it, so its not something I'd do. Check the area where the ...


5

Before you start doing anything on your mower disconnect the spark plug wire and make sure it's away from the spark plug so the engine doesn't accidentally start if you turn the blades. Think of how old prop planes were started by turning the prop. On lawnmowers I've used and seen there spark plug has always been either on the front or back but tipping it ...


5

The motor runs at full power is a good clue here. While I, too, would reach for the low compression as a first guess, that seems less likely if the motor is running fine (and also if it starts fine - my mower that needs a rebuild is an absolute bear to get started when cold.) If you happened to have, or to know someone who has a compression tester that will ...


5

Usually you can't, at least not effectively. Mulching mowers have aerodynamically appropriate decks and specially-designed blades that recycle the clippings to pick them up and re-cut them repeatedly, then drop them uniformly. Traditional mowers are designed to direct all clippings out the chute. It's often not a simple thing to make the former from the ...


4

Your lawn is more than 1500 m²? Opt for a riding mower and save a lot of time in the maintenance of your lawn, and all this at less effort! This machine allows you to cover large surfaces quickly and efficiently, and reduce your working time to increase that of your toes fan out your lawn Yes but now, how to choose a riding mower? Follow the guide, I reveal ...


4

Get one of those spiral push manual mowers. Bonus - Burn some calories instead of gas!


4

This is probably a better question for the folks on the stack motor vehicle maintenance site. But, if you're mowing along and suddenly a ton of white smoke comes out, it seems like something inside broke and let oil into the combustion chamber. I'd pull out the spark plug and see if there is evidence of oil burning. If so, maybe it ran too hot and broke a ...


4

Have you tried replacing the spark plug? Also make sure to double check your manual to make sure your air filter is not meant to be soaked in oil.


4

Just used my reel mower in the damp grass. Probably would've done a better job if it were dry. My mower wants nothing to do with tall pieces of seed grass. But all the other grass cut fine. Note to self: don't wait so long to cut the grass next time.


4

Well, I hate to contradict anyone, but we've been attending manufacturers updates schools since the 70's and early eighties and I assure you, you always turn the mower towards the dipstick - always. The manufacturers went through a lot of painstaking engineering to make lawnmowers function in this regard without either, oil not draining, or gas filling up ...


4

This is actually a very difficult fix, depending on if any cord remained. The inside of a pull start mechanism contains a coil spring and a ratcheting mechanism. When you pull it, the ratchet pawls engage, turning the motor while tightening the spring. When the motor starts, the ratcheting pawls disengage (or your hand would be ripped off), you release the ...


4

Don't try to fix it yourself, as @Hari explains, but do take it to your local repair shop. It's by no means the end of the machine. I've had a 1/2 dozen cords bake over the years and my local mower repair shop fixed them quickly and inexpensively.


4

Most commercial mowers and many manufacturers, now highly recommend, adjusting the blade so the rear is one adjustment "higher" than the front. With a properly matched blade-to-deck and rpm, this will create the necessary "vacuum" to lift the blades of grass in the (rear) and cut them evenly on the lowest (front) end. And I believe, if you're at 3" inches in ...


4

I have no clue how large an area this allotment is nor how neat and tidy you want it to be. But rather than grass, why not remove the grass and replace it with an inexpensive and sturdy ground cover that only grows a few inches tall? Lawns made of grass are a fairly recent development in the history of landscapes. For many centuries, ground covers were the ...


4

I would consider use a sickle scythe. This is quite a technique to learn, but once you have then you're good. It is a good way to cut high grass. From what I know, it is usable on high grass and works well as long as it is well sharpen. To keep it so, it must not be used on small wooden stems which would grow if you wait really too long between cuttings.


4

You're a fine use-case for a scythe (well, the poor security would have me taking it home, not leaving it there.) But you might need to make use of a rake depending on your stone situation (the size and projection from the surface of them - if you try to cut them it's not good for the blade.) An antique in poor condition is not the scythe you want. I would ...


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