New answers tagged

1

It depends on the soil. I have done in two different location , but both soils were very sandy. Looked good in place one after 7 years. In the second location much longer ; pathways disappeared under spreading grass and weeds after 15 years. I should have cleared the path with a weed-eater a couple times a year. The flagstone pieces typically had a major ...


1

I have found that the deciding factor is the size of the stones. Small stones can shift off level or be pushed up with the spring thaw in colder climates. Big stones don't move around so much. The other reason to use sand is to provide a less attractive place for tough plants to grow. It was a surprise to me to see horsetails (equisetum) apparently grow ...


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Some varieties in US grow upright some spread. The spreading varieties do not grow tall. Presumably you have snow and flat top or spherical pruning may be a problem with snow weight damage . In northern IL ,I had a few branches break with two feet of snow on spherical shapes. Yews do take pruning well. When I saw yew in UK , I could hardly believe they were ...


3

You can prune a yew into pretty much any shape you want, including hedges of any height from 2 or 3 feet up to as high as you want to go. They are also popular trees for topiary. Left alone, they will eventually grow to 60 feet (20 meters) tall. They are also one of the longest lived tree species. In the UK the oldest yews are estimated to be between 2,000 ...


2

Plant 1 It is hard to guess without closer look to the foliage, so I am going to split my pick: Juniperus 70% Chamacyparis 15% Thuja 15% This reason that I favor juniperus is that many plants of that species have that gorgeous "windswept" look, the look seen on the original photo. Plant 2 Picea abies 'Nidiformis' Well-known and in demand dwarf ...


2

Sometimes you just have to bite the bullet. Everything is on the table. A fence is just a fence and can be removed and replaced, or not. Heavy concrete pavers can be removed and replaced, or not. With the pavers and the fence out of the way, a small digger/backhoe on tracks could take the stony soil out, be trucked away to someplace where fill for a ...


3

Possibly Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple' (Smokebush) or similar purple cultivar, though some of the leaves don't look quite right - a bit too pointed, maybe? On the other hand, the stems look right. Check out the photos here. If it is a cotinus, you'll know for sure when it flowers.


3

The shrubs are spirea, and assuming that the first picture was taken in late summer and the second one this spring, then they're probably the cultivar Gold Mound. Of course, they could also be one of the other dozen or two spirea cultivars common in the nursery trade. Their flowers should be rosy or dusky-rose clusters.


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I found a couple of possibilities. If you can add a close-up of the top surface of one leaf, that might be helpful in confirming or ruling these out. Red tip photinia (Photinia x fraseri) (image source) Japanese andromeda (Pieris japonica) - young leaves are red in some cultivars (image from this article) Both are evergreen shrubs with some red leaves ...


1

This is a lilac, a member of the genus Syringa. Based on leaf shape and flower color, it could be Persian lilac (Syriga x persica) or common lilac (Syringa vulgaris), or another variety.


2

Yes, that's a rhododendron. Yup.


2

It's not Elaeagnus, the leaves are too small and not leathery enough and the growth habit is wrong. It's most likely a Euonymus variety - judging by its growth habit, it's more likely to be Euonymus fortunei, perhaps the variety 'Emerald and Gold' (sometimes called green and gold) rather than E.japonica, which tends to grow much taller without spreading out ...


4

Your shrub appears to be a Hydrangea macrophylla lacecap variety, judging by the flower on the top left of the image. These do often have dead sticks sticking out from previous years and should be pruned back to the base. You might find you can just snap them off with your fingers though. Your plant does look a little stunted - the flowers are smaller than ...


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Looks like "snowball viburnum". Many clusters of white flowers in spring . It will get 20 ft. tall if not pruned. The limited number of blooms indicates it was pruned at the wrong time.


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Junipers; there are several varities sold for landscaping .


2

Your tree is decaying, and you can not stop it. If you leave it alone, the decay will progress next several years, trunk will probably split at some point in time, and the tree will eventually die (soon in the scale of tree or human lifetime). Weed growing from the tree does not affect this process in a significant way, you can leave it or remove it as you ...


2

Yes, this looks very much like Berberis thunbergii "Atropurpurea". It's a tough plant that can be cut hard back if it gets too big. Mind the prickles.


3

Yes, this is a hosta. The somewhat heart-shaped (lanceolate or ovate) leaves with the district veins following the leaf shape is quite telling and so are the upright (in your picture bent over) scapes with the flowers towering over the greenery. Your specimen’s color pale purple is a frequent color, hosta breeds bloom typically in the white to purple. If you ...


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We could look at this issue through a number of lenses: legal, technical, cost, emergency On the legal stuff, we know that California is generally a borderline desert state and may well have special regulations regarding irrigation. For this you need local expertise. Enough said. Since your system has been in for 20 years you may just enjoy some ...


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