12

Time efficient? Hire a bulldozer. Push the debris into a pile, have a load or two of manure (chicken is great, horse may be easier to find and also works well) dumped over the pile. Wait two or three years, enjoy your pile of topsoil/compost. Money efficient? Goats.


7

If it were my job, I'd cut down the hedge to about 1 foot tall, get a mini-excavator and dig up the roots. This will also help loosen the soil for replanting. You could work other areas of the soil as well. Disposing of the debris is a matter of choice. I like Ecnerwal's suggestion if you have the space and patience. Or rent a chipper and create chips ...


7

Doing the job in manageable sections one at a time is a good plan. You might change your mind about the details when you see what the first section(s) look like, for example. Don't make the job harder by doing things in the wrong order. Don't build a wall and then try to take out the grass right up to it. Decide where you want the wall to be, cut out the ...


3

Was your contractor supposed to landscape the site with "good black dirt"? If so, he didn't. It looks like you've been given, at best, fill soil. It's predominantly clay (about 87% of the soil particles are "fine", which means they're very, very small. This indicates a clay soil), with the remainder being sand and gravel. The gravel could ...


3

I agree with everything that alephzero wrote and can add several other points: If you plan on mowing alongside your new garden bed, pay attention to mowing patterns. The easiest way to do this is to lay out the proposed bed with a hose and then use your (non-running) lawn mower to pretend that you're mowing the lawn. You'll quickly find out if the new bed ...


2

It is difficult. The best method: look around you, to see what other have done, and ask how their method is effective. There is a lot of try and error loop, and it is good if the "error" part was done by others ;-) An option is to use the electric fences, ask to a local dealer: it depends on soil, vegetation, and wild animals which and how to set up an ...


2

Hello & Welcome Doug, You left coyotes & cougars off your list. There is no way to keep out Raccoons. They can climb any fence. Deer can leap anything lower than 8'. Skunks & rodents can dig there way in. Unless you put up a concrete barrier both below and above the ground. Most fences as long as they are not too low will hold most dogs, ...


2

One piece of advice - most 'bushes' i.e. trees, shrubs and weeds just start growing again if you chop them down, and as its spring, they'll do it pretty soon after cutting down. Most conifers do not regrow once cut down, but most other plants do, so I'd suggest only cutting down those you intend to remove the roots of in fairly short order, rather than ...


2

Assuming you mean lawn grass, no, 2 inches isn't sufficient - you need a minimum topsoil depth of 4 inches, but preferably 6 inches for a healthy lawn. Further information here https://www.gardenguides.com/12284756-how-to-lay-topsoil-over-gravel.html


2

Mulch around trees serves a couple of practical purposes: It prevents you from having to string-trim around the base of each tree every time you mow. This also prevents any damage to the bark from the trimmer. If you (or a lawn service) use a riding lawn mower, the mulch prevents tire ruts from forming around the tree. In all cases, the mulch should not ...


1

A tip that I got from elsewhere that's worked wonders now that I'm further along in the project: you can cover grass with paper bags from the grocery store or cardboard from Amazon packages and put down mulch on top of that. It will kill the grass over time, but you'll be able to dig through it to put in plants. We created four areas like that and one via ...


1

I would just rake it level and put pavers down , looks like a good base. I have built two paver patios on essentially the native sand soil , no problems. I also built a 8 'X 12 ' garden shed putting house brick on native sandy soil , it has a heavy cabinet sitting on the brick and has not moved in 20 years .


1

Just do it. You may find you need to adjust later, but then there's the question of "how flat does it really need to be, anyway." If looking for information on doing this sort of thing intentionally, "hugelkultur" is a good search term. Note that if termites are an issue where you live, buried wood is attractive habitat and may increase ...


1

It depends on the size of the pine- how much root system it has. Here in the "piney woods" the typical southern pines have 4 ' diameter trunks and could easily lose a 6 " root with no problem. When the center of my lot was cleared of pines , a bulldozer dug out one side then pushed over the trees ( not quite as easy as it sounds). The idea was ...


1

I’m in London Garden path laid on concrete with Smooth concrete sloping sides down to existing lawn. Top soil to be laid on top of sloping concrete then turf on top soil. Will it work long term? Will the grass eventually die even with good watering & phosphate fertiliser to aid grassroots growth & bonding with top soil? Hope this helps. Many thanks ...


1

It sounds like it is landscape fabric - this is usually used primarily for weed suppression. It's laid on top of soil which has hopefully been dug over previously, then holes are cut into it, usually by making a cross, then folding back the flaps and planting into the gap. The fabric will be cut around any pre-existing planting, and then a mulch of some ...


1

Flush, if not a bit higher than the stones. To avoid nasty toe grabs and broken nails if barefoot, or silly looking stumbles when walking with your arms full, try and make it as close, if not s tough higher than the stones. The spongey-nature of the grass will sink a bit when stepped upon, so consider this when installing.


1

You cannot just let a yard "go" and expect it to return to a meadow. I have a non-nearby neighbor who thinks that's the way to garden "naturally" and has done just that, after initially planting native perennials and grasses. Now, they have an impressive collection of weeds mixed in with/dominating their plantings. Among the beauties on ...


1

It's probably a trencher or more likely a cable plow. Cable plows like backhoes/diggers can often be operated normally in either forwards or backwards directions. In this shot the operator is looking backwards so the controls are behind his back. To move to a new location he would turn around and the controls would be in front. If it was a trencher we would ...


1

My old silver maple stump had a convenient rotted hole, in which I planted tiger lilies. It looked pretty nice until the stump got soft enough to whack apart with a sledge. Now I have a patch of tiger lilies growing on the remaining tree mulch. If your stump lacks a hole you can put dirt and plants in, you can fix that with a hatchet. I suspect flowering ...


1

One of the easiest ways is to add what’s known as a tree face. The face can be screwed right into the stump and can really help change it into something fun. We added three whimsical style faces on our property, two on actual trees and one on a stump. The grandkids love them. We even got one that looks like an old man. The grandkids call him, “Grandpa Tree.” ...


1

With minimum information in , one gets minimum information out. Corten is relatively high strength steel , with 50,000 + psi yield compared to 35,000 psi yield for ordinary hot rolled steel.It is intended for atmospheric exposure ( occasional wet , usually dry) , not buried or in a location where it is always wet. Steels are about 4 X heavier than concrete ...


1

Easy. What I did was get a truck with a hydraulic arm on the back and pulled each one vertically out of the ground. Each Bush was secured by a chain wrapped around the trunk, then up she went. Roots mostly pulled out, and some broke off. Fast and efficient with no need to trim or saw. Obviously any machine with a hydraulic arm will do the job. I just ...


1

Kissing the ground monthly with carefully calibrated amounts of herbicide can kill off the weeds and leave the bushes standing. As they say, poison is all about dosage. An expert on herbicides, if told your desirable and undesirable plant species, may be able to help. For instance 2,4-D goes after broadleaf but leaves grasses alone, and is quite safe (...


1

Chain saw, hedge trimmers, wood chipper or match or online advertisement. Assuming that you are familiar with using a chain saw enough to be safe. Note that you can forgo the hedge trimmers if your chain saw skills are high enough. Use the hedge trimmers to come in waist to knee height to locate and get access to the main truck/root. Then use the chain ...


1

A 4x4 pickup with a low-range transfer case should help. Wrap chains (not straps, which can snap violently) around the trunks and creep the vehicle to pull them out. The larger ones you may have to treat more like trees and grind the stumps.


1

yes, changing the grade on an established tree is risky. If you do as you indicated you were thinking about and remove soil then let the roots sit on top of the soil this will stop them from absorbing water and exchanging nutrients with the mycorrhizal fungi in the soil. The roots will effectively stop working. I often find people writing that they ...


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