7

Doing the job in manageable sections one at a time is a good plan. You might change your mind about the details when you see what the first section(s) look like, for example. Don't make the job harder by doing things in the wrong order. Don't build a wall and then try to take out the grass right up to it. Decide where you want the wall to be, cut out the ...


5

According to the pest-control company Terminix, termites don't really feed on wood mulch but like the fact that it causes a moist environment, which they then use for cover to explore for a wood source. Terminix, because it wants to sell you their services, rather dramatically states that "Mulch doesn't necessarily attract termites, but can serve as an ...


4

That is funny “top grade mulch” as termite resistant. I say this as I have worked in the lumber and plywood industry for a few years. My plant specializes in small log recovery (old logs have more bugs) and you find termites time to time but the process usually kills them. The bark is scraped off the trees then it goes through a machine called a hammer hog ...


4

In my opinion, you should not remove every other plant - keep them all. The problem is: thujas generally don't grow from "old wood". If you remove every other thuja, you will probably find areas at neighboring thujas that do not have green leaves. From these areas, there will be no new growth - only the growth from surrounding, green-leaved areas ...


3

I agree with everything that alephzero wrote and can add several other points: If you plan on mowing alongside your new garden bed, pay attention to mowing patterns. The easiest way to do this is to lay out the proposed bed with a hose and then use your (non-running) lawn mower to pretend that you're mowing the lawn. You'll quickly find out if the new bed ...


3

Was your contractor supposed to landscape the site with "good black dirt"? If so, he didn't. It looks like you've been given, at best, fill soil. It's predominantly clay (about 87% of the soil particles are "fine", which means they're very, very small. This indicates a clay soil), with the remainder being sand and gravel. The gravel could ...


3

Mulch around trees serves a couple of practical purposes: It prevents you from having to string-trim around the base of each tree every time you mow. This also prevents any damage to the bark from the trimmer. If you (or a lawn service) use a riding lawn mower, the mulch prevents tire ruts from forming around the tree. In all cases, the mulch should not ...


2

Assuming you mean lawn grass, no, 2 inches isn't sufficient - you need a minimum topsoil depth of 4 inches, but preferably 6 inches for a healthy lawn. Further information here https://www.gardenguides.com/12284756-how-to-lay-topsoil-over-gravel.html


2

It's probably a trencher or more likely a cable plow. Cable plows like backhoes/diggers can often be operated normally in either forwards or backwards directions. In this shot the operator is looking backwards so the controls are behind his back. To move to a new location he would turn around and the controls would be in front. If it was a trencher we would ...


2

Contractor responsibility and owner responsibility are always a difficult balance. The owner invites a contractor onto the property and by doing so must expect the unforeseen; there are generally a wide variety of contractors available for a work to be completed and it's the owner bears the responsibility of the choice. Once committed to a contractor, the ...


2

White color makes it very likely to be mostly lime stone. The size looks like limestone "screenings" . When limestone is crushed certain size ranges are used for concrete ; so sizes are separated by screens . The angular shape also indicates a crushed material. This is size is too small for concrete and is essentially a by-product. Smaller "...


1

"And a Man shall ever see, that when Ages grow to civility and Elegancie, Men come to Build Stately, sooner then to Garden Finely: As if Gardening were the Greater Perfection." Francis Bacon, The Essayes, 1625. That much said, weeds grow pretty well on gun emplacements on the Normandy coast where Erwin Rommel deliberately constructed piles of ...


1

I wouldn't recommend it personally; the quantity of rubble is a bit much, and it has a tendency to move together and form a fairly impenetrable layer over time,and 40cm down isn't very deep either. Under the lawn,it may cause drainage issues. If you were going to use it as a kind of hardcore under an area that will be paved, fine, but I wouldn't be too ...


1

If you want to sow seed, you'd need to rough up the compacted surface, keep it watered, then strip it all out and compact it again later ready for the pool contractor. If the area of bare soil is mostly going to be covered by poured concrete or hard surfacing, I would cover the soil with something like thick black plastic across the whole area, anchored ...


1

I'm assuming you're in USA. Did your project involve a contract? Was there any language about unintended damage to property? Anyways, the landscaper should be insured against damage to customer property. I would have a certified arborist appraise the tree. I'd ask for the landscaper to compensate you for the value of tree plus costs to remove it. They can ...


1

They'll be fine after you plant them. I assume that you're in the north (US or Europe), so it's very important that you water the arbs very, very well this autumn - up until the ground freezes. This will help prevent them from experiencing any/much winter-kill. I would also water them well the next summer (at least one inch/2-3cm per week). After a season in ...


1

Just do it. You may find you need to adjust later, but then there's the question of "how flat does it really need to be, anyway." If looking for information on doing this sort of thing intentionally, "hugelkultur" is a good search term. Note that if termites are an issue where you live, buried wood is attractive habitat and may increase ...


1

It depends on the size of the pine- how much root system it has. Here in the "piney woods" the typical southern pines have 4 ' diameter trunks and could easily lose a 6 " root with no problem. When the center of my lot was cleared of pines , a bulldozer dug out one side then pushed over the trees ( not quite as easy as it sounds). The idea was ...


1

I’m in London Garden path laid on concrete with Smooth concrete sloping sides down to existing lawn. Top soil to be laid on top of sloping concrete then turf on top soil. Will it work long term? Will the grass eventually die even with good watering & phosphate fertiliser to aid grassroots growth & bonding with top soil? Hope this helps. Many thanks ...


1

It sounds like it is landscape fabric - this is usually used primarily for weed suppression. It's laid on top of soil which has hopefully been dug over previously, then holes are cut into it, usually by making a cross, then folding back the flaps and planting into the gap. The fabric will be cut around any pre-existing planting, and then a mulch of some ...


1

Flush, if not a bit higher than the stones. To avoid nasty toe grabs and broken nails if barefoot, or silly looking stumbles when walking with your arms full, try and make it as close, if not s tough higher than the stones. The spongey-nature of the grass will sink a bit when stepped upon, so consider this when installing.


1

You cannot just let a yard "go" and expect it to return to a meadow. I have a non-nearby neighbor who thinks that's the way to garden "naturally" and has done just that, after initially planting native perennials and grasses. Now, they have an impressive collection of weeds mixed in with/dominating their plantings. Among the beauties on ...


1

A tip that I got from elsewhere that's worked wonders now that I'm further along in the project: you can cover grass with paper bags from the grocery store or cardboard from Amazon packages and put down mulch on top of that. It will kill the grass over time, but you'll be able to dig through it to put in plants. We created four areas like that and one via ...


1

I would just rake it level and put pavers down , looks like a good base. I have built two paver patios on essentially the native sand soil , no problems. I also built a 8 'X 12 ' garden shed putting house brick on native sandy soil , it has a heavy cabinet sitting on the brick and has not moved in 20 years .


1

You can grow grass on a thin substrate but without soil depth the roots will be shallow and the grass will die in drought or severe condition unless you constantly upkeep it with extra watering, extra fertilizer, more mowing. Unlike most woody plants, grass doesn't have a taproot, so it has a fibrous wide root.


1

My old silver maple stump had a convenient rotted hole, in which I planted tiger lilies. It looked pretty nice until the stump got soft enough to whack apart with a sledge. Now I have a patch of tiger lilies growing on the remaining tree mulch. If your stump lacks a hole you can put dirt and plants in, you can fix that with a hatchet. I suspect flowering ...


1

One of the easiest ways is to add what’s known as a tree face. The face can be screwed right into the stump and can really help change it into something fun. We added three whimsical style faces on our property, two on actual trees and one on a stump. The grandkids love them. We even got one that looks like an old man. The grandkids call him, “Grandpa Tree.” ...


1

Thuja "Green Giant," worked for us. It grew about a foot a year and blocked out the neighbors really quickly. Although it does grow REALLY tall. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaHrOYx1w4M


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