12

Time efficient? Hire a bulldozer. Push the debris into a pile, have a load or two of manure (chicken is great, horse may be easier to find and also works well) dumped over the pile. Wait two or three years, enjoy your pile of topsoil/compost. Money efficient? Goats.


11

As a former landscaper who lives in Ontario I can answer this question. If you advertise yourself as a Landscape Architect then you must be one and a member of the Ontario Association of Landscape Architects. Degrees and diplomas from other countries or provinces may be accepted as credit towards a degree in Ontario. Landscape firms are another matter. ...


10

Plants will grow up to the light. I recommend planting them perpendicular to the imaginary level surface. Anything else would look odd as the alternative is not seen in nature. What will help is building a small ring of soil on the downhill side of the shrub and applying a few inches of organic mulch all round. this will capture and retain rain or ...


9

It depends on whether you want to keep the sod or no and if the ground is already pretty flat. I haven't used a sod cutter, but I think the ground has to be fairly level. I don't think it works well if there are dips in the ground. I think for 250sq/ft, which is around 16'x16', you can man up with a shovel and a pickmatic. Figure out where you want to have ...


8

Three options I can think of right now: Craigslist, Local newspaper and Freecycle Our paper has a free $50 and under section which still gets traffic even in this digital age. You might be pleasantly surprised by someone willing to come pick that gravel up. Folks looking for fill material might not care at all that what it is mixed in. Freecycle is ...


8

Definitely not plastic - landscape fabric needs to be water/air permeable. The reason fabric's used is to reduce or stop weed germination, particularly when stones are laid over the top. Even that's not a permanent fix though - over time, particles of soil gather in the stones and eventually weed germination can take place in that top layer of stones. If ...


8

I think this depends on the city and builders guidelines where you live. Where I live the standard tree in front of each new house was the Ash (Fraxinus) or the Linden. Cheap because they propagated easily and a fast grower. Oak trees and hard maples were usually an upgrade. Sadly the Emerald Ash borer has decimated the Ash species which comprises up to ...


8

That is most likely landscaping fabric designed to block or inhibit weed growth. If the soil layer is too thin where you intend to plant perennials, feel free to cut out a circle of the fabric and plant appropriately.


7

As it's such an old tree, I'd be inclined to get someone to carry out a Picus or sonic tomograph test as well - if the Resistograph results are echoed by the Picus, then you might need to do something, even if that's removing the tree above the point where it's weak. It's probably sensible to get another person to do more testing, then you get a second ...


7

Time is your friend; speed is expensive. Solarizing is something you do for quite a long time, so "not hot enough yet" is really not a problem. You see the suggestion because many weeds find a quick trip through the tiller as a great opportunity to spread far and wide - they bounce back a lot faster than any grass seed you put down starts. Likewise, the ...


7

The bottom branches dying is perfectly normal, as they get shaded out (they also have more deer pressure, assuming a typical presence of rats-with-hooves in your neighborhood.) That is not a sign of a dying tree at all. Maintaining greenery to the ground requires actively trimming and shaping to keep the tops from shading out the bottoms - I don't think ...


7

15x30 feet with the sort of weed density you are showing? - Take an hour and pull them out by hand, or with a hoe. If you notice a lot of root penetration below or between the under-fabric you might want to rake back the surface and lay additional fabric, but I'd bet you mostly have weeds growing in the "rubberized play impact surface" itself and whatever ...


7

If it were my job, I'd cut down the hedge to about 1 foot tall, get a mini-excavator and dig up the roots. This will also help loosen the soil for replanting. You could work other areas of the soil as well. Disposing of the debris is a matter of choice. I like Ecnerwal's suggestion if you have the space and patience. Or rent a chipper and create chips ...


7

Doing the job in manageable sections one at a time is a good plan. You might change your mind about the details when you see what the first section(s) look like, for example. Don't make the job harder by doing things in the wrong order. Don't build a wall and then try to take out the grass right up to it. Decide where you want the wall to be, cut out the ...


6

I know that the questions asks about the efficacy of stump removal chemicals, however, I assume the intention is to gain information on removing a stump. A friend of mine just hired a 40lb jack hammer from Home Depot for $55 for 4 hours and said that it was the perfect tool to quickly and efficiently dig up his stump. Personally I thought this was an ...


6

Short answer: if you're looking for the simplest thing that will give you the most value, buy some Western white pine and Grand fir seedlings and plant them about 6' apart in rows about 6' apart like this: P P P P P F F F F F P P P P P Thin them (i.e. cut some down) as they grow if needed (you will have ...


6

A good layer of mulch should still be apparent after one year of laying. If the mulch is gone after one year, you'll need to add more next time. Being a busy landscaper myself, I don't have time to get everyone covered in spring, and pretty much mulch whenever it's not freezing out. I find that the mulch generally lasts about the same, no matter when you ...


6

If you are moderately careful you can do it by eye with a regular level. If you happen to have a laser level easily available, you can use that, it's easier. In either case, the method is the same - pick your starting point, and set the level on a stick (or tripod) above it. Measure the distance from the ground to the level, write it down, then use your eye ...


6

When you say pole saw I assume you mean a standard manual pole saw. If you're willing to spend a little money look into a chainsaw pole saw, that should tear through them in a hurry.


6

Tree roots stop growing immediately after the tree has been felled, but may take weeks to months (and longer) to die unless the stump has been poisoned with a herbicide. If the stump is not treated, then the roots may send up sprouts, and the roots will start to grow again. While they are alive, trying to advance their decomposition will not work. It is ...


6

Mulch around the tree frequently, and pull out any small plants growing at the base of it. Only water if soil is dry, because overwatering is a major killer. Only prune dead or diseased branches. To protect it from animals a plywood sunscreen can also protect it from insects. However if you live with large animals like deers, you may need a plastic tube or ...


6

The ground looks very compacted, so first step would be to aerate and loosen the surface. Some easy tips here: http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/improving-compacted-soil.htm Is the block wall around the perimeter of the yard retaining any soil behind it or is it there for security/screening. If it is retaining I would do some ...


6

I had to do the same thing when I moved into my new house a few years back. However, I used outside help but can tell you the sequence and steps. Get a detailed design together as to what you want the yard to look like. This includes all drainage, electrical, gas lines and irrigation I don't know if you need to get approval or permits but that would be ...


6

Depending on the grass (certainly with kikuyu), it will break through the additional soil very quickly (I made this mistake recently). You might consider spraying the grass with glyphosate [ie the active ingredient in most common weed killers - often called "Roundup" ] first - although this could harm the trees if significant quantities get onto the ...


6

https://njaes.rutgers.edu/deerresistance/ A great list of what plants are good for deer resistance and what will get hurt. Keep in mind you are more than likely able to put certain plants by others to keep the ones that can not safe. They do not actually keep the deer away, but the deer hate eating some of these plants, which should keep them away. But like ...


6

I'm sorry to say that its likely most of those methods will work - chopping it all down and covering with black plastic will probably mean you'll have bamboo shoots growing up through the plastic, it'll come through that in no time. Digging it out with machinery might work, if you do it all at once and make sure to get out all roots, no matter how deep they ...


6

If you're looking for something non-toxic since it's a play area, you can use hot water or a heavy salt water solution. I don't love these methods since they have mixed results and the salt can leave a residue. If you go to Amazon you can find natural weed killers based on vinegar. I've used those and they work quite well, but again, depending on your ...


5

Montana is high plains. Bitter cold winters, hot summers. Dry all year. I don't think cedar will work here. Some of the upright junipers might be ok. My experience is based on Canadian Prairie. Even colder winters, cool summers, similar precipitation. Good information about shelterbelts: Trees and Shrubs for Prairie Shelterbelts (Agriculture and Agri-...


5

Weed and feed products do not actually contain grass seed that I am aware of. They are for fertilizing and weeding existing lawns. If the grass in this area is the same grass as is in the rest of your yard (which looks pretty open and sunny) then I would not expect that same cultivar to do well in dense shade as well. A trip to a good garden store in your ...


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