8

Definitely not plastic - landscape fabric needs to be water/air permeable. The reason fabric's used is to reduce or stop weed germination, particularly when stones are laid over the top. Even that's not a permanent fix though - over time, particles of soil gather in the stones and eventually weed germination can take place in that top layer of stones. If ...


8

Without looking at your video, I would expect the landscape fabric is being laid as a weed mat to inhibit weeds from regenerating from roots left in situ and coming up in the middle of the raised garden bed. Some people use layers of newspapers, and others old wool carpets.


5

Ok, I can finally answer my own question. The reason was that the fabric was closely folded then rolled for the packaging, and when I unrolled the fabric for the permeability test I hadn't seen that I actually poured water on two layers of the fabric stuck together. The permeability is ok with the test on one layer. I feel kind of stupid. Case closed.


5

One of the main reasons people build raised beds for vegetable gardens instead of planting directly in the ground is because it's often easier to fill a raised bed with a good soil than it is to try and improve poor soil in the ground. Raised bed are commonly filled with either good topsoil and compost mix or something more like a soilless or a peat-based ...


3

Personally, I have tried weed fabric/landscape fabric and I now have a seething hatred of the stuff. YMMV. As the wood chips (or whatever is on top of it) break down, weeds start to germinate above the fabric, while the fabric interferes with normal processes in the soil. I consider it worse than useless in the long term. Given the age of your garden, I'd ...


3

Skip the cardboard - it'll rot down very quickly and won't provide any stability for such an area. Many people who have vegetable gardens simply lay fresh chipped wood or whole branch cuttings onto 'paths' or areas intended for walking on between beds. These sort of layers are not always easy to walk along, particularly when you stop to cultivate or tend an ...


2

You have only had it installed for a month? How big are the holes around your plants. You probably know how much I loathe this weed barrier practice. I am glad you sense that it is not a good thing for the soil ultimately for the plants and it does not stop weeds. This fabric was designed to use as a barrier beneath gravel installations. Keeps the soil ...


2

I fully agree with stormy about the use of landscape fabrics but I have an alternate suggestion. At the end of my answer, I'll address whether to use landscape fabric or ground cover. You say you'd like to place a border of rocks 2 - 6 feet from the bottom side of your house. If the ground was leveled properly around your house, it will slope gently away ...


2

I'm building a nice 12' X 3.5' X 23" asparagus bed. I'm using 12' X 5" X 11.5" beams. I hope that the bed will be productive for many years so I'm using hardware cloth and landscaping cloth underneath the entire bed to protect the bed from weeds and little varmits of the tunneling variety. I wish I had done it years ago but now is better than never.


1

It sounds like it is landscape fabric - this is usually used primarily for weed suppression. It's laid on top of soil which has hopefully been dug over previously, then holes are cut into it, usually by making a cross, then folding back the flaps and planting into the gap. The fabric will be cut around any pre-existing planting, and then a mulch of some ...


1

I cannot give you much information. But one thing I could say is with what the leaf's look like. Its some kind of spore disease of some sort. they spread very easily. Droplets of rain can spread it easily. I recommend Cutting off infected branches in a couple year process to not exceed 25% of canopy in one year. Disinfect your cutting shears after ...


1

I need to clarify slightly what you've said- you say you put a ring of stones around the base of your gingko tree, then wrapped the base of the trunk in landscape fabric, and covered that with drainage pipe, and then filled in the whole area with soil, presumably to the depth of the stone ring. If I've not got that right, please correct me, but it sounds as ...


1

If the health of the tree has suffered following your work, you need to undo that work. Covering tree roots inside the tree drip line can compromise the health of the tree by reducing oxygenation to the roots. A picture would be nice too to see exactly what you have done.


1

Well, you may not like my answer but this is one of my major pet peeves. This fabric was never meant to be a weed barrier. It will not stop weeds. Installing this fabric is for one reason only and that is to stop what we call 'sumping'. Not in the dictionary, I've looked, it is what we call it in the landscape construction field. What this fabric was ...


1

Landscape fabric was NEVER meant for weed fabric. I hate whoever decided to make more money perpetuating this LIE. This fabric is meant to go gravel, BENEATH rock, lava rock so that the fines in the soil below don't come up to the surface while your gravels go down into the soil profile. That is what they should only be used to do. (I've heard the word '...


1

Landscape fabric should NEVER be used for weeds. What it was designed for was to place between soil and gravel so that the gravel doesn't sink down into the soil and disappear. Plastic or this fabric under mulch stops all the processes between plants and soil and organisms. The best thing I've found for weed control that also feeds your soil is ...


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