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7

Most continuous production systems (tomatoes & peppers in greenhouses or the tropics being the major exception that comes to mind) do find it beneficial to replace old plants with young ones on a regular basis. In zone 4 we don't really have this problem, as winter provides a defined end point (you can pick kale in the snow, but it pretty much stops ...


5

Ladybugs like to eat two things - some insects and pollen, so if you can plant around and about with plants that they'll like, that should help to not only attract them, but keep them around, so long as you've got something in flower for them. Not sure what the temperatures are like where you are, but in the UK, finding things ladybugs like that are in ...


4

Don't want to disuade you from trying but when a problematic bug explodes in number, they will never be quickly eradicated with a predator bug. Better to attend to conditions that caused the aphid outbreak. Without plentiful other sources of food for ladybugs and other conditions, they don't hang around. In any case, they will not effectively clean up aphids ...


4

First and foremost, do confirm they are aphids. Pictures would help us confirm. Once you have been attacked by aphids, you are probably going to see them again. The real long term solution is to employ lady bugs. These guys will take care of the aphid problem quite well for you. Stormy is right. Hot water is not a good idea, unless you are talking about ...


3

Looks like a combination of whiteflies and early-stage white mildew infection to me. I usually get both when I try to grow kale in Seattle, but not this year due, I presume, to unusually hot and dry conditions. Of course you can clean as best you can, and eat it. There's nothing toxic about either of those afflictions, and I doubt the taste would be ...


2

Aphids are soft bodied easy to kill insects. You do not want to poison yourself with pesticides meant to do major devastation. NEEM is as far as anyone should go for pesticides on their vegetables. NEEM is very gnarly. One treatment is usually enough. A second a few weeks later. This is a fun fact; buy lady beetles and they will go anywhere but YOUR ...


2

Brassicaea aphids are very difficult to control because they gather on the underside of leaves. Chemical control is, unfortunately the best and most effective. The products to use should contain deltamethrin, lambda cyalothrin or cypermethrin . Products will vary from countries to countries but a green fly, aphid killer should be available from garden ...


2

Turns out this is related to some excessive and abnormal heat wave we had for a few days. The plant seems to have recovered, except for the few leaves that got hit with the excessive heat. In hindsight I should have increased the water frequency or times during the heat wave.


2

Aphids like many insects go for the weakest plant they can see. So, if you have a raised bed of differing plants, you'll find that the aphids will target the weak plants and leave the strongest alone. So, in my mixed raised of bed of cauliflowers, and broccoli, the broccoli are untouched but the cauliflowers are infested with aphids and cabbage worms ( I ...


2

If your compost gets to high temperatures and you turn it over so it all gets "cooked" then it's fine. Mealy bug are tough and persistent so given the chance of reintroducing them I would not reuse the compost for any vegetables. Perhaps outside?


2

These are probably cabbage loopers. You can use the biological control Bacillus Thuringiensis, commonly known as BT. It is a bacteria that infects many caterpillars, causing them to stop eating and they starve to death. It is non-toxic to humans.


2

No point washing the plant or changing potting mix. You could look on the leaves and remove the eggs weekly (most likely on the underside of the leaves).


1

Yes, it is Erysiphe cruciferarum - powdery mildew. I have not treated this myself. Bicarbonate sprays have been used successfully on moderate infections. If the plants are in pots then keep them out of the rain, otherwise you have to repeat the applications. If you can find it easily, Potassium Bicarbonate is better, and is sold commercially for this ...


1

Yes this looks like mildew, probably because the weather has chanced and the moisture levels in the air are higher now. I have treated mildew once, not on kale but on an oak bonsai tree. I used a mix of milk and water (40/60%), and sprayed the affected leaves. It worked very well, and is organic without chemicals. I don't know why it works, but it does work. ...


1

The caterpillar that you have there is from the white moth. They are all over my garden. I literally harvested some lettuce + arugula today and made a salad and found about 5-6 of those caterpillars on the leaves. I rinsed the leaves with water best I could and enjoyed the salad. I wouldn't over think it. I'm sure I've probably missed a few in my life and ...


1

I've seen this before on plants. White flies only live on the back of leaves. Until they overpopulate, then they're on both sides. To get rid of whiteflies all you need to do is hose the leaves twice a day for 3 days. Hose the back sides where the Flies are. It knocks them down onto the ground where they die. Then their eggs that hatch, need to be hosed off. ...


1

Identification starts with getting as much information using all senses. The photos are great, but we cannot tell what happens if you rub on a spot, does it come off or is it damage to the leaf? Do you have other brassica type crops close by showing similar effect? Then we can speculate on cause: starting with simplest, is it perhaps an evaporated deposit? ...


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