10

Pick them as soon as they are as ripe as you want them. They won't get any bigger, and too many fruit will restrict the formation of more fruit. If you live in a dry climate, then @Brian's suggestion of hanging them up is definitely the way forward, and is very traditional in places like New Mexico. @Kate's dehydrator should work in a humid climate, but ...


7

Harvest them before they freeze, or the resulting mushiness will ruin everything and they will rot. Jalapenos are picked green - if you leave them on the plant they will turn red, which isn't bad, just unexpected. I llke to pickle jalapenos. I add a little turmeric and onion flakes to hot vinegar, use a cold pack technique, and process them well. The ...


6

I believe the jalapenos start to turn black because of the season changing. My plants have produced beautiful peppers green and red for 6 mths. Every year the new peppers that start to grow in Oct., (on the same plants with exactly the same routine and care ) start to get a black glow to the skin. It does not seem to damage the flavor of the pepper but I ...


6

I live in Delaware and have already harvested my jalapeno and chili peppers. If you do nothing but leave them on the dining room table, some of the green peppers will ripen to red, some will dry out (get wrinkly, but remain edible), and many will start rotting or growing mold. You can freeze them whole or sliced, but I prefer drying. I dry the chili peppers ...


5

I dry my peppers by stringing them up with a needle and thread and then I hang them in the opening between our kitchen and porch which has a wood burning stove in it. After a couple weeks the peppers are dry enough to store in bags or jars. I've done this with Thai Chilies and Tabasco Peppers.


4

Appallingly, I've just harvested a chilli plant I let dry out and die, and then left for so long that the chillies simply dried out on the plant! Not an ideal approach, and only of any use if you aren't hoping to get a second year from your plant, but it was a very low effort way to preserve them!


3

Chilis are best harvested before they have fully ripened. Else, the mush could destroy the entire plant. As for storage purposes, simply use an everyday container like a glass jar or plastic box that you find in your kitchen and ensure it is airtight and moisture-free. I heard that some people actually wrap their chilis in newspaper to absorb the moisture ...


3

It may be blossom end rot, does it look like this: http://www.caes.uga.edu/applications/publications/files/html/C938/images/Figure7.jpg ? If it is, blossom end rot is caused by a lack of calcium to the plant. Have you had your soil tested? It might show that you need to increase the calcium in the soil. There are plenty of organic fertilizers that are ...


3

Yes, it's normal for some kinds of peppers to get some black on them, including Jalapeno and Banana peppers. I've had bell peppers like this before, too. I'm not totally convinced that it's just the mixing of the pigments, though, because they can keep those black streaks a long time before they're fully ripe (or before any of the final color shows). It ...


3

You more than likely have a tomato worm or two on them! They are hard to see. If you see little black round droppings on the ground around your plants, you probably have these worms. They attach themselves to the plant itself and they are the same color as the plant, so they're very hard to see because this is their disguise. Hope this helps


2

As others have said - pick them before a frost/cold. I make hot sauce with the peppers and I also I slice my habaneros and freeze them in baggies. You can cover the plants with a low tunnel/low hoop house to extend the season a little bit. I have also dug up a plant or two and brought it into my sun porch to extend the season.


2

Some of the pickled jalapenos seeds are alrady germinating in the jar, you probably just didn't notice it. Put them on wet cotton and see what happens. Thank me later. Try. Experiment. Enjoy.


2

Looks like sunburn/cold damage, as suggested by others. I don't know where you are in the world, so its hard to be definitive, but those seedlings look a little small to be thrust into the outdoors in cool spring temperatures but high uv levels (northern hemisphere) - best to wait till they've formed proper small plants (with a good half a dozen sets of ...


2

I have never had BER with peppers but with tomatoes I find it helps to pinch off the first few flowers of the summer to give the plant a chance to develop a good root system before attempting to support fruits. As suggested above good watering practices can also be a factor.


2

Many chili pepper varieties will get stress cracks to let you know that they are done growing even if their color hasn't changed. Flaming jade serranos will turn red in a few days in a paper bag. Jalafuego jalapenos usually need to start turning color on plant before finishing in bag. Habaneros and tomatoes produce a lot of ethylene(gas given off during ...


2

I see two issues. One, this plant seems to have a deficiency - the yellowing inbetween the veines is not good. There are a multiple possible causes - amongst them iron deficiency, wrong ph and too much water - and it’s hard to diagnose without more information. Two, the plant has a massive spider mites problem. The webbing is a clear indicator, as is the “...


2

Congrats on getting them to seed! Starting seeds indoors is a great, low-cost way to grow your own food. It may take several attempts over years to get really good at this process, but it is well worth it in the end. You should try to split these apart so that each plant is in it's own container. Jalapeños need a fair bit of space, maybe 15 inches (40cm) ...


1

Yes, a plant can produce many chilli pepper in such containers: it is common to use small pots (especially for shops). But for me, the plant is maybe too much watered and fertilized, on the other hand, it is still a seedling, so it could be ok. An other worry from me is about your location (windows with condensation?): if it is fall and cold (and not much ...


1

If you have little bugs on web it is likely to be red spider mites also called 2 spotted spider mites. They eat away at the plant sap in very little time and can kill a plant which explains the yellowing of the leaves, the vascular system of the plant is quickly drying off(chlorosis) Also, the fruits turn red very quickly because the plant knows it is ...


1

Your pepper is desperately in need of a simple balanced fertilizer. The curling on the edges is lack of Potassium. The green of your plant is also saying Nitrogen deficiency. Have you used anything for fertilizer? All plants need a balanced fertilizer of NPK. And I gotta say my little dumb ditty about fertilizer; Less is Best, More is Death and None ...


1

I looks like sunburn to me, but good news, those damaged leaves are just cotyledons, and they were going to fall off naturally any way... I have gotten this from peppers that I have started in domes in the sun, or in peppers that I have started inside and moved them out... In my experience it just isn't even possible to harden off tomatoes / pepper ...


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