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7

Like many plants, Jade plant stems are comprised of 'nodes and internodes' (the nodes containing the concentrated meristem tissue): The nodes hold one or more leaves, as well as buds which can grow into branches (with leaves, conifer cones, or inflorescences (flowers)). Adventitious roots may also be produced from the nodes. The internodes distance one ...


7

Looks like over watering. The soil itself looks wet to me. The elephant's ear, like all other Jades, can use very little water, so you can usually just stick to weekly or even two-weekly watering schedules. This is a very resilient plant, so if this is the first time it happened, just let the soil dry and then water later. If the leaves fall off repeatedly ...


7

This plant is not a Crassula! It is a Portulacaria afra, commonly called Spekboom or Elephant Bush in South Africa, which is where it originates. It is extremely drought tolerant, but can also grow quite fast and very lush under kinder conditions. In Adelaide, Australia (where I live) you can plant it in your garden as long as the soil drains well in the ...


7

If, when you say jade plant, you mean Crassula ovata, it should be fine - will need dusting to keep your allergy problems down though. It does flower, which means pollen, but rarely indoors and only after several years and only then if its in a very sunny spot. You might find the following article useful: http://www.beyondallergy.com/indoor-allergies/...


6

Making a cut might damage the epicormic buds. I would advise you to lightly damage the bark by scratching it in order to remove the thin layer of epidermis and stimulate new shoots. Don't forget that these buds are fragile, so don't apply too much force. The important thing to consider is that epicormic buds are located near the spot when another leaf or ...


6

I'm a year late, but I'll answer, anyways, in case someone else finds this page. That's not Crassula ovata; it's Portulacaria afra - you can see the difference in the shape of the leaves. Common names include Dwarf Jade, Elephant's Food, and spekboom (in Afrikaans). This is probably the easiest plant I have ever seen to cultivate from cuttings. I'm in ...


5

Quick take them out of the water! Like most succulents they root by making a clean cut at the root end with a sharp knife or razor and letting it sit on the windowsill for a week or so. Then, once the wound has dried, place in damp sand and high light. Keeping sand damp is harder than it seems. Wet is no good, dry does not encourage roots. Do not cover ...


5

That's a teeny tiny pot for that size jade. For true house bound plants, you want to incrementally increase the size of the pot each year so that the medium gets filled with feeder roots. If you just put a small plant in a big pot, the roots will grow outward, and then start growing round and round the pot, this leaves a huge amount of unused soil which is ...


4

That's a sure sign of stress.Don’t water your jade plant on a schedule. Rather, water your jade plant when the top of soil is just dry to the touch. Also see the soil at the base of the plant, if it's dry water it.The most important factors to consider when growing jade houseplants is water, light, temperature, and fertilizer.Every plant needs some type of ...


4

That is a very nice Jade plant. The leaves look plump which means they have enough water. How much you should water depends on the light levels, soil type and the pot arrangements. in winter months reduce water quantity so the leaves are still plump to the touch. optimum soil type is sharp sand (builder's sand) with a little organic matter like peat moss ...


4

First, your plant looks as if it's in a small black pot contained inside an outer pot. If that's the case, it needs a bigger pot, so repot into a larger container using new potting soil. Second, when you water, don't ever leave water sitting in any outer tray or pot, so make sure that is emptied 30 minutes after watering, once the plant has drained down ...


3

Yes you can keep a jade indoors, but it does require bright light..much more than any artificial office light will offer. It looks like you used soil from the great outdoors rather than a potting mix which is also a problem for a jade and for most container grown plants in general. This plant is not looking too hot. My suggestion would be to take it out ...


3

Your jade plant is dying because of lack of sunlight and too much watering. Jade plant in my area can survive hot summer days with minimum watering, its leaves will turn a slight red to indicate it is getting a lot of sun and will look wrinkly when needs water. So indoor jade plant will start shed leaves and yellowing if gets too much water and not enough ...


3

I'm assuming that by "Jade tree" you mean a Crassula - if not, please let me know and I'll delete this answer. I'd repot it now. I've grown jade plants for decades and haven't given time for repotting much thought - done it winter or summer with no ill effects. Just keep the plant out of direct sunlight for a week or so.


3

Ok, so I agree with the post that discusses increasing the pot size. If you do decide to use the leaves or lop off anything, you actually need to dry them out and wait until they start putting out new roots. They will do this most of the time. The stump that was left in the original pot will also start to regrow. This webpage really helped me! http://...


3

Brown spots on leaves are usually caused by these factors: soil is too wet too often which results in waterlogged soil, virus/fungus/bacteria attack the plant and dead spots are usually seen in the oldest leaves first too much fertilizer can raise the level of soluble salts in the soil and cause "burn" sometimes physical damage can cause dead areas I find ...


3

To me it looks like over watering or poor drainage. If this is a cactus/succulent pot then don't water it on a schedule. Water it when the soil has a chance to go dry.


3

Jade plant is actually Crassula, usually Crassula ovata, but there are other varieties such as Crassula rupestris; even with Crassula ovata, there are varieties with slightly smaller leaves, variegated leaves and so on, so its possible you have a slightly different variety from the basic Crassula ovata. From the photo supplied with your other question on ...


3

I think you should repot it into a larger pot with drainage holes (1, at most 2 sizes up) removing the mossy stuff at the top as you do it by pulling it all off, including some of the soil attached to it, without damaging the roots of the Jade plant. Use fresh potting soil to pack round the rootball and keep the soil level the same as it is now up the stems....


2

I have raised almost every kind of cactus and succulents in my sixty years of loving them. In almost every case I have found that watering once a month is plenty and you will never have one rot, or root rot. If you’re somewhere very hot you can step it up but it’s been a never fail rule for me. I use the first day of the month so I don’t forget.


2

The problem does look likely to be environmental rather than an infestation or disease. Jade plants (Crassula argentea) like plenty of sunlight, particularly in winter, and good air flow around them, so if it's in the house, near an open window in summer is helpful. You haven't said where you're keeping your plants but I think that's a Haworthia I can see in ...


2

Yes, remove them from the water and let them root dry. Once they've rooted again, don't water them as much! That's probably why the original plant rotted.


2

Adding pebbles to the top of the pot would likely somewhat reduce the rate that water evaporates from the pot simply by reducing the amount of moist soil that is directly exposed to drier air. Of course, this can be accounted for very easily just by reducing the frequency of waterings to allow the soil a little more time to dry. The pebbles themselves ...


2

If it were mine I would go with the first option. Be sure and let the cut part dry overnight before you put it in new dirt.


2

Generally the way to make a plant sprout new shoots is to remove the growing tip of the main stem/s, as this will encourage the initiation of other meristems (buds). I'm not sure how you would specify to the plant which bud or buds to initiate, though, unless you were to somehow render all the undesirable buds non-viable (probably a bad idea for the plant's ...


2

I don't know if it would really harm, but the best time to repot bonsai is early spring. The reason is that in early springtime the plants are still in dormancy, but will start growing soon again. So it will grow new roots easily. Important is that you don't have frost during this regrowth period, because the new growth is very sensitive to this. Of course ...


2

Jade plant is susceptible to sunburn. If you take it out doors and plop it in full sun, you'll get something that looks like you have. The plants usually recover by putting out new leaves with chloroplasts/thylakoids arranged so as not to capture too much energy. Sun angle is changing rapidly this time of year, before spring solstice, so you may be getting a ...


2

Your worry is well placed - the empty pot is a bit too large for such a small plant. Find one that's 1-2 sizes bigger than the pot it currently occupies instead, somewhere between the two pot sizes you have there. This Q & A might be helpful Transfering a plant to a larger pot


2

Most of this plant's problems can be resolved by changing some habits the plant is getting too much water, water once a week or when the leaves are starting to wrinkle not enough light, move right against the window ensure there is drainage from the bottom of the pot rocks do not go in the bottom of the pot as this does not help drainage but instead creates ...


2

There's a difference between flowering houseplants and those which are grown for their foliage. Flowering plants need a different NPK, whereas foliage houseplants do better with either a balanced NPK (7-7-7) or one that has a higher nitrogen level. Baby bio is a houseplant food and that has an NPK of 10.6-4.4-1.7, which you can see is quite different from ...


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