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7

It's extremely helpful that you included the actual ingredient list in your question, rather than a brandname - thank you! So you know, I grow anything that I eat organically and this question is one of the reasons why I do (the other reason is that I was once a Certified Pesticide Applicator for five years, and the training you receive to get that ...


6

This is a larva of a ladybird (ladybug, Coccinellidae), they are actually good if you want to get rid of Aphids or others leaf suckers. Adult ladybugs are known to eat aphids, and they are often used for biological control of pests. The larva eat actually much more aphids, so cherish this little larva!


4

Rose aphids (Macrosiphum rosae). The two backwards-facing tube are black, which confirms identification. Not good for roses. They carry viruses from plant to plant, and a large number on a rosebud will stop the flower forming. What to do? search this forum for "rose aphids". If you have time you can rub them off with gloves into a bucket, natural ...


4

You've posted a very good image from which it's easy to see this is a Ligurian Leafhopper. The black dots are likely frass (the insect's poo) and they feed by sucking the sap from the leaves and stems of the host plant, image and information here http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/VEG/LEAF/Ligurian_leafhopper.HTM They will happily use mint as a host plant, ...


3

Those appear to be aphids, although the resolution of the photo leaves them a bit blurry under magnification. That would also explain the ants, since aphids secrete a sugar-like syrup known as honeydew which the ants like. It's probably easiest to remove them by hand, unless you have a lot of infected plants. You could also use insecticidal soap, but make ...


3

Your Scarab guest is an adult Spotted Grapevine Beetle, Southern Variant, Pelidnota punctata, and they generally dine on wild & domestic grapes & grape leaves, and generally arenot a serious pest of grapes. The adults are about 25-28mm in length, and the grubs/ larvae, which feed on rotting wood and live underground for a year, grow to 45-50mm long. ...


3

Top insects are thrips: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=876 and will be causing some damage, other insect is a psocid https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psocoptera and should not be a problem for the plant.


2

Happened to my jasmine plant recently and it stopped flowering for a couple of months. I sprayed some alcohol on the underside of the leaves for a few days straight, trim away damaged leaves and fertilized the soil. She is flowering again almost immediately after that.


2

It's probably spider mites - they're often red, but can be tan coloured or white, and they do create fine webbing. They thrive in dry air, so ensure you keep the plant sufficiently well watered ongoing. Insecticidal soap spray or neem oil spray are suitable treatments, but ensure you cover the entire plant, including backs of leaves, when spraying. You ...


2

I think these are probably Green Shield Bug eggs, image of the eggs here https://www.animal.photos/insect4/shbg-grn.htm. Our native green shield bug is always about and doesn't usually cause a lot of damage to plants, so are usually tolerated. There is another green shield bug which has been found breeding in the south of the UK, and that can cause damage on ...


2

It's the caterpillar of one of the three moths commonly called "death's head hawk moths". This one is acherontia atropos. It normally feeds on Solanaceae (potatoes, tomatoes, nightshade, etc) though your Chameli (jasmine) isn't in that plant family. The moth is very large and has some curious habits. For example it will enter bee hives to feed on honey, ...


2

One source I've read (wish I could remember where it was so I could reference it here) stated that a typical mole's diet is 75% earthworms and 25% grubs of all kinds, so your moles are probably going after the worms in your yard.


2

You won’t love the Moles after you have ruined a few lawnmower blades. I don’t recommend encouraging a mole infestation. If you allow a population to really get established, your lawn will be the source of other people’s problems. I think it better to plant something the grubs won’t eat. I happen to like like Dutch White Clover. The grubs don’t eat it and it ...


1

That looks like earwig damage (they like to hide in dark, damp places). They aren't really eating the peppers, but using them as temporary homes. There are a number of different ways to deal with earwigs. Although I usually just ignore them, the newspaper trap works well if they become a problem in my yard. The newspaper trap is simple: roll up a piece of ...


1

The proposed answer here (via a knowledgeable and esteemed colleague who wishes to remain anonymous) is tortoise beetle. They normally feed on sweet potato family (Ipomoea) but have been seen on tomato and other crops as you can discover from a search on "tomato tortoise beetle". The general consensus is that they do not do serious damage, but they are sure ...


1

I think it is more likely to be an earthworm in your pot than a bee or wasp nesting underground, especially if the pot is indoors. Earthworms don't "eat" plant roots, but they can cause problems by continuously disturbing the soil in the pot. Take the plant out of the pot, have a poke around in the soil and if you find the worm, put it somewhere ...


1

Probably flea beetles, they love brassica crops. Depends what part of the world you're in as to which ones you've actually got - they tend to attack seedlings, so it's best to provide row covers to keep them off. Later, waxy or curly leaved crops like cabbage or kale are less attractive to them, but still somewhat vulnerable. Assuming you're in USA, ...


1

Carpet beetles This is not a plant pest, although on rare occasions they would lay eggs in dead plant matter. Management of carpet beetles


1

Cut the dead stem off at the ground with a pair of secateurs to get a clean cut. Or you can twist the dead foliage and it might come out clean. The bugs you saw were unlikely to be the cause of the problem. Most tropical plant pests are slow moving and live on the underside of the plant's leaves or stems. You should ignore them as applying pesticides is ...


1

It's pea leaf miner, a common pest on peas. Quite often, it's only a problem on the young leaves - it is quite difficult to treat because the little miner is between the membranes of the leaves. As they grow, they move round eating the leaf tissue on the inside,and when they are big enough (not long) they leave. All leaves on your plants seem to be affected ...


1

Good photo, very helpful. This looks like mealybugs which are a known problem on papaya in India. There is a wiki page and there are many pages describing remedies. The big problem for home gardeners is that there are many host plants which can be sources of continuous infection; you may control it for now but they will be back very soon. If you only have ...


1

I have to say I would not hesitate to call a pest control company to do it for you - they will deal with it efficiently, rather than you struggling to do it and not doing it very well, especially as that's an awkward access area. Pest Control companies are still allowed to operate at the moment in the UK, though they may not all be working - ring round and ...


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