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15

Perhaps the first question to ask is "Is this property suitable for frogs?" and following on from that "If it is, why are there not frogs here already?" I have many, many frogs on my property since I am close to a wetland, so their noise in Spring is quite loud. There are also many snakes here which like to have frogs for lunch, but there ...


8

Be careful to only pick native species. If you want to introduce toads into your garden for pest control, I have one word of warning for you: make sure to only use a species of toad native to the area you live in. In Australia, in the 1930s, someone had a very similar idea to you, and they decided to import some South American toads, in the hopes that they ...


7

It's extremely helpful that you included the actual ingredient list in your question, rather than a brandname - thank you! So you know, I grow anything that I eat organically and this question is one of the reasons why I do (the other reason is that I was once a Certified Pesticide Applicator for five years, and the training you receive to get that ...


7

We caught a bunch of toads on the roads when I was a kid for a frog jumping contest, and put them in our yard when it was over. We've had toads in the neighborhood ever since. They poop around the yard (mostly on the sidewalks), and by examining it, I can tell they eat a lot of pill bugs (which we also have in abundance). I believe they'll eat ladybugs, too, ...


6

This is a larva of a ladybird (ladybug, Coccinellidae), they are actually good if you want to get rid of Aphids or others leaf suckers. Adult ladybugs are known to eat aphids, and they are often used for biological control of pests. The larva eat actually much more aphids, so cherish this little larva!


5

Everyone should have some frogs and toads ; unfortunately you will probably not notice a difference in bothersome insects . I have a 10' X 5' pond , then added an 8' diameter one and accidently have a 55 gal aquarium full of rainwater. I have large numbers of frogs and toads ; I cannot list them but everything from bull frogs to at least 2 kinds of tree ...


4

You've posted a very good image from which it's easy to see this is a Ligurian Leafhopper. The black dots are likely frass (the insect's poo) and they feed by sucking the sap from the leaves and stems of the host plant, image and information here http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/VEG/LEAF/Ligurian_leafhopper.HTM They will happily use mint as a host plant, ...


3

Top insects are thrips: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=876 and will be causing some damage, other insect is a psocid https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psocoptera and should not be a problem for the plant.


3

Those appear to be aphids, although the resolution of the photo leaves them a bit blurry under magnification. That would also explain the ants, since aphids secrete a sugar-like syrup known as honeydew which the ants like. It's probably easiest to remove them by hand, unless you have a lot of infected plants. You could also use insecticidal soap, but make ...


3

Your Scarab guest is an adult Spotted Grapevine Beetle, Southern Variant, Pelidnota punctata, and they generally dine on wild & domestic grapes & grape leaves, and generally arenot a serious pest of grapes. The adults are about 25-28mm in length, and the grubs/ larvae, which feed on rotting wood and live underground for a year, grow to 45-50mm long. ...


2

I think these are probably Green Shield Bug eggs, image of the eggs here https://www.animal.photos/insect4/shbg-grn.htm. Our native green shield bug is always about and doesn't usually cause a lot of damage to plants, so are usually tolerated. There is another green shield bug which has been found breeding in the south of the UK, and that can cause damage on ...


2

It's the caterpillar of one of the three moths commonly called "death's head hawk moths". This one is acherontia atropos. It normally feeds on Solanaceae (potatoes, tomatoes, nightshade, etc) though your Chameli (jasmine) isn't in that plant family. The moth is very large and has some curious habits. For example it will enter bee hives to feed on honey, ...


2

One source I've read (wish I could remember where it was so I could reference it here) stated that a typical mole's diet is 75% earthworms and 25% grubs of all kinds, so your moles are probably going after the worms in your yard.


2

You won’t love the Moles after you have ruined a few lawnmower blades. I don’t recommend encouraging a mole infestation. If you allow a population to really get established, your lawn will be the source of other people’s problems. I think it better to plant something the grubs won’t eat. I happen to like like Dutch White Clover. The grubs don’t eat it and it ...


2

Those are tunnels of some kind of borer - the larvae make the galleries when they feed on the tree. It's possible that the borer did indeed kill the tree, but without knowing the genus of the tree it's not possible to be certain.


2

It's a palo verde beetle (derobrachus hovorei). They show up during the summer months.


2

Happened to my jasmine plant recently and it stopped flowering for a couple of months. I sprayed some alcohol on the underside of the leaves for a few days straight, trim away damaged leaves and fertilized the soil. She is flowering again almost immediately after that.


2

The two horns at the back (siphunculi or cornicles) are common in aphids, and useful features for identification. But less than 1mm is very small for aphids. It may be Aphis fabae, as a search indicates it can be present on your tree, and is 1-2 mm long. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_bean_aphid But not sure at all.


2

They're galls and are probably caused by insects or mites. Unfortunately you can't do anything about it I'm afraid (the leaf damage is permanent and irreversible and by the time you notice it chances are that the bug that has triggered the change has already left). The only possible "treatment" for the leaves is to remove them and a possible ...


2

Sounds like springtails. Not a problem. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Springtail With one exception they dont harm plants, and eat bacteria, fungi, and decomposing matter. The exception is the lucerne flea - but that lives on the branches and leaves.


2

There's a natural control for mosquito larva in the form of BT bacteria. This is the same bacteria who's genome was used to source the genes added to corn and other crops to reduce pest damage. The bacteria can be bought as a small jar/cannister of granules that float in water and are coated with bacterial spore. I found about about them when I was looking ...


1

They're thrips, and are very contagious and persistent. There are several ways to treat them, you could google to see one that suits you. Best of luck, definitely isolate the sick plants as they spread. Best of luck!


1

Finally found the answer: they are wood sorrel seeds! http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/bug%E2%80%99s-eye-view/2019/yellow-wood-sorrel-seed-vol-5-no-30


1

It looks possible that the problem is either at the roots or from that sunken area which has no bark on the trunk, leading down to the part which has whitish deposits. Clear away the debris from the base of the tree and check whether there is any fungal growth very close or nearby to the trunk. Also check whether that sunken area in the trunk (especially at ...


1

That looks like earwig damage (they like to hide in dark, damp places). They aren't really eating the peppers, but using them as temporary homes. There are a number of different ways to deal with earwigs. Although I usually just ignore them, the newspaper trap works well if they become a problem in my yard. The newspaper trap is simple: roll up a piece of ...


1

I think it is more likely to be an earthworm in your pot than a bee or wasp nesting underground, especially if the pot is indoors. Earthworms don't "eat" plant roots, but they can cause problems by continuously disturbing the soil in the pot. Take the plant out of the pot, have a poke around in the soil and if you find the worm, put it somewhere ...


1

The proposed answer here (via a knowledgeable and esteemed colleague who wishes to remain anonymous) is tortoise beetle. They normally feed on sweet potato family (Ipomoea) but have been seen on tomato and other crops as you can discover from a search on "tomato tortoise beetle". The general consensus is that they do not do serious damage, but they are sure ...


1

Check the temperature where the hotel is located. Ensure that in cold times of the year, there is warmth from the sun.


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