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16

Perhaps the first question to ask is "Is this property suitable for frogs?" and following on from that "If it is, why are there not frogs here already?" I have many, many frogs on my property since I am close to a wetland, so their noise in Spring is quite loud. There are also many snakes here which like to have frogs for lunch, but there ...


14

I agree with the other answers, you probably have an aphid infestation. But rather than spraying your trees to get rid of the aphids, you may try putting a ring of glue on your tree, to get rid of the ants. Without their support, your aphid infestation will probably quickly rescind due to the natural predators.


13

The trees have probably got aphids. From the RHS website here: Ants may be found climbing plants with aphid colonies, they tend the aphids obtaining honeydew as a reward. The ants will remove aphid predators. Not much you can do about it. If you spray the aphids, you risk killing useful predators such as ladybirds. Best treat it as all part of nature's ...


9

The problem with not treating for aphids is it's likely to get worse, especially with ants warding off aphid predators. With large trees, it's obviously next to impossible to treat for aphids because you can't reach the top easily, but for your smaller tree, if there are a lot of aphids,I would recommend some treatment, even if that's just you physically ...


8

Those „eggs” are not eggs, but cabbage aphids at different stages of maturity. They feed exclusively on brassicaceae, so other non-brassica plants nearby remain safe. In dry summers they can cause severe damage and multiply very quickly. Like all aphids they suck the plants’ sap and when the infestation is severe, cause the leaves to shrivel and prevent ...


8

Be careful to only pick native species. If you want to introduce toads into your garden for pest control, I have one word of warning for you: make sure to only use a species of toad native to the area you live in. In Australia, in the 1930s, someone had a very similar idea to you, and they decided to import some South American toads, in the hopes that they ...


7

We caught a bunch of toads on the roads when I was a kid for a frog jumping contest, and put them in our yard when it was over. We've had toads in the neighborhood ever since. They poop around the yard (mostly on the sidewalks), and by examining it, I can tell they eat a lot of pill bugs (which we also have in abundance). I believe they'll eat ladybugs, too, ...


6

Everyone should have some frogs and toads ; unfortunately you will probably not notice a difference in bothersome insects . I have a 10' X 5' pond , then added an 8' diameter one and accidently have a 55 gal aquarium full of rainwater. I have large numbers of frogs and toads ; I cannot list them but everything from bull frogs to at least 2 kinds of tree ...


5

It might be instructive to look for the Hawthorn shield bug which feeds on the fruits of both hawthorn and other species including rowan (mountain ash). The fruits are attractive because both are pomes, like apple fruits, with a fleshy, juicy outer cover. The shield bugs pierce the fruit and allow them to bleed juices which contain sugars that the ants can ...


4

Aphids and ants might like my trees, but they love garden nasturtium. If there's a nasturtium somewhere close to the trees, aphids, ants and ladybugs will happily move there (here's a related article): As a bonus, these plants are easy to grow. Every part of it tastes great, provided it's not too rich in protein.


2

The two horns at the back (siphunculi or cornicles) are common in aphids, and useful features for identification. But less than 1mm is very small for aphids. It may be Aphis fabae, as a search indicates it can be present on your tree, and is 1-2 mm long. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_bean_aphid But not sure at all.


2

They're galls and are probably caused by insects or mites. Unfortunately you can't do anything about it I'm afraid (the leaf damage is permanent and irreversible and by the time you notice it chances are that the bug that has triggered the change has already left). The only possible "treatment" for the leaves is to remove them and a possible ...


2

Sounds like springtails. Not a problem. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Springtail With one exception they dont harm plants, and eat bacteria, fungi, and decomposing matter. The exception is the lucerne flea - but that lives on the branches and leaves.


2

There's a natural control for mosquito larva in the form of BT bacteria. This is the same bacteria who's genome was used to source the genes added to corn and other crops to reduce pest damage. The bacteria can be bought as a small jar/cannister of granules that float in water and are coated with bacterial spore. I found about about them when I was looking ...


2

It looks like a crab spider of some kind. There are lots of kinds. Here are some links with pictures that look like yours: http://mobugs.blogspot.com/2009/11/crab-spiders.html https://naturegardensnhm.blogspot.com/2012/02/killer-legs-crab-spider-wins-prize-with.html (This one's a white-banded crab spider.) Supposedly, crab spiders can change colors (so, ...


1

So this is citrus scale, common on citrus and hard to really get rid of. More details are here. I recommend removing every leaf on the plant then rubbing the stems with soap and water at five day intervals. You can use a rag or paper towel. Repeat at least three times and don't be afraid to do more applications This is effective because: you are reducing ...


1

The insect pictured is not a thrip because it doesn't seem to have wings, though I can't otherwise identify it. Since you found it under a pot, its likely to be an insect that prefers damp conditions, which is why it was under there.


1

Turns out they are Assassin bug (Reduviidae) eggs


1

Contact a local tree care company. A lot of the times they offer a systemic injection into ground around the root system of the tree. The tree will uptake the treatment and then when the aphids bite onto the tree (usually the underside of the leaves where its soft), they will take in the treatment and die. I have had this done with Elm Scale for my Elm tree.


1

You didn't say how big the tree is. If you have aphids on roses, you can just brush them off. A tiny minority might make it back to the plant or be carried back by ants, but most wont. Doable if it's a short sapling, but perhaps not too practical for huge mature tree :).


1

This is a honey bee; they crawl around oddly on soil when there is something in the soil which is of great interest to them. It could be water, or easy sugar, or they pick up the pheromones from a colony in the soil. This can happen if say you use a knife to spread honey on a bread slice, then wash the knife in clean water and put the water on the soil. This ...


1

I cannot tell the scale of the picture, to me that looks like either a fungus gnat, a small fly or a mosquito. What kind of plant and describe what you mean by attack.


1

Finally found the answer: they are wood sorrel seeds! http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/bug%E2%80%99s-eye-view/2019/yellow-wood-sorrel-seed-vol-5-no-30


1

It looks possible that the problem is either at the roots or from that sunken area which has no bark on the trunk, leading down to the part which has whitish deposits. Clear away the debris from the base of the tree and check whether there is any fungal growth very close or nearby to the trunk. Also check whether that sunken area in the trunk (especially at ...


1

They're thrips, and are very contagious and persistent. There are several ways to treat them, you could google to see one that suits you. Best of luck, definitely isolate the sick plants as they spread. Best of luck!


1

Check the temperature where the hotel is located. Ensure that in cold times of the year, there is warmth from the sun.


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