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Just off the picture alone (which is not enough to be certain) my guess would be that the plant has root rot. You might want to check if the roots of the plant look healthy. My thought process for this guess is that the older leaves are very dry (roots probably rotted away and could not suck up enough water), while there are no signs of limping/wilting (this ...


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I think the damage may be caused by the actual sucking parts of the scale insects. They adhere tight to the plant and literally suck the sap out of it so the discolouration could well be where they were attached, like a little scar. It sounds like you’ve done all the right things to help your lime plant fight off the scale invasion but their life cycle is ...


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Turning up heat in the room to about 22 degrees may help. I would recommend moving the plant to where there is sunshine so it grows better. I wouldn’t use filtered tap water since it does not include the minerals that are needed for your plant. In conclusion, the main thing you should do is that the water you give to your plant is mineral water/ tap water. ...


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If you want to add a support such as a moss stick, I suggest you wait to repot till late February/early March when daylight is not in such short supply, if you can bear to - you will need to insert the stick into the soil and this may well cause some root damage which, as others say, is harder for the plant to recover from at this time of year. In the ...


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Bence is right about that. I would just add that the plant may be growing outwards, having the leaves facing the window growing bigger, maybe finding the light intensity from the window more suitable than what's around the pot area. In the warmth inside the house you may still notice some growth, albeit slowed down. I don't know how warm is the area, but ...


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You can repot plants during the winter with care. If you leave the root-ball intact and you just back fill the extra space around it in the new pot you do not have to worry. The key is not to bother with the roots. Usually plants should be repotted during the growing season so they have better conditions to regenerate any damage to the roots, etc. Note that ...


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Alocasias have bulbs and can be grown from bulbs, How to grow an Alocasia from a bulb. So what you have found in the pot are unsprouted Alocasia bulbs. These plants often could go dormant, loosing all of their leaves and becoming a stump just to regrow from the bulb next spring. Here is an Alocasia bulb from the article above.


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Pothos, Devil's ivy, in Asia it is called money plant but I don't know why.


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Personally what I'd worry about the most is the temperature. Storages in general have no heating whatsoever, yet all the plants you've mentioned are basically tropical plants, so they must be kept at least at room temperature (or just slightly below that at worst) at all times. With that being said out of the plants the Dracaena tolerates the lack of light ...


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More finicky Philodendrons have unfurling issues due to low humidity but with your plant it should not be an issue. I think what you have is a pest issue, probably Thrips (but can be other as well). Here are a couple of images from a Monstera and a Philodendron Brasil that had/has Thrips infection and look similar. These insects are very tiny and very hard ...


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I'm pretty confident that the pictured plant is an Aeonium of some kind. The keys are The upright "trunk" and branching The flattened rosette of leaves at the end of each "stem" The way in which the leaves whorl about the center in each rosette The leaf shape If this is an aeonium, then care is relatively easy, beginning with "DO ...


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The two linear cracks on the bottom leaf are almost certainly caused by physical damage to the leaf. The pot may have tipped over and that leaf was caught underneath, or it may have been shoved to the back or side of a shelf and crushed against the wall. The other damage on that leaf probably happened at the same time. The spots on the top leaf are more ...


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I think the leaves start to yellow and drop because of the too small size of the container. The rootball is too small for the size of the plant above ground and therefore it cannot take up enough nutrients. Some leaves therefore will be sacrificed, the nutrients are taken from these leaves and you'll get yellowing and eventually dropping. The top of the ...


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Nowadays the Peace lilies sold commercially are forced to bloom. They use gibberellic acid which will make the plants bloom within 3-4 months, when they will sell it. They are forced to bloom with gibberellic acid, a natural plant hormone that stimulates cell division and elongation. So if you have bought a Peace lily that was in bloom, it does not mean ...


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These are naturally occurring salts from the water added to the pot. As clay is permeable it absorbs the water with the salts. As it dries and the water moves into the soil the salts are left behind and make the crust or layer that you see. To remove this wipe the rim with a cloth that has been soaked in a dilute mixture of vinegar and water. About 1 part ...


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My best guess is Cissus rotundifolia Vahl also known as Arabian Wax Cissus:


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The formulation of your bonsai fertiliser isn't much use to the type of plants you mention; they will require higher levels of nitrogen. For instance, Baby Bio is a good liquid houseplant fertiliser, and its NPK is roughly 10-4-7, so you can easily see the difference in the NPK value between that and your bonsai fertiliser. Whatever you decide to do with the ...


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Per the Farmer's Almanac Jade Plant Guide, it seems like your plant isn't getting frequent or deep enough watering: If the plant starts to drop its leaves, if leaves start to shrivel, or if brown spots appear on the leaves, it is an indication that the plant needs more water. So give it a nice, deep watering, but the water shouldn't spill out of the tray ...


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You've done a good job investigating the roots and trying to address the problem. Penn State Extension has a very clear table summary of common problems affecting your plant. I think your attention to your roots is a good first step in addressing the problem. The Penn State Extension, below, points to the brown roots as evidence of root rot: I personally ...


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My father as a child took a chomp out of a sansevieria, he described it as just tasting painfully, eye wateringly, stinging bad, he has since survived to be a 74 year old retired botanist... If you don't notice it altering the taste of your drink I would think that you are well below the threshold of toxicity.


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Sansevieria is only toxic if eaten - and then you'll only get an upset stomach because it's not that poisonous. There's no danger from placing it near food or drink.


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You are watering incorrectly - it is better to wait until the surface of the soil in the pot feels quite dry to the touch, but not so dry its shrunken from the sides of the pot, then water thoroughly, allowing excess to drain away freely from the bottom of the pot, not allowing water to collect and sit in any outer tray or pot, that should be emptied out. ...


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Finally found the answer: they are wood sorrel seeds! http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/bug%E2%80%99s-eye-view/2019/yellow-wood-sorrel-seed-vol-5-no-30


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I am surprised not to see the ZZ plant or Zamioculcas zamiifolia in the other answers. This plant is a very very low maintenance one: It can tolerate the lowest light conditions. Mine is about 3-4 meters away from a North facing window, which is pretty low light. It does not need to be watered very often, it is enough when the soil gets completely dry. I ...


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