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It doesn't look like a fungus or mushroom to me. I think you have slime mold, something in the Arcyria genus. Mycelium doesn't usually grow above the top inch of soil--but slime mold colonies will come up if conditions are right. They're really cool and most species are benign to plants. They're not a mold, actually related to amoebas! They live as single-...


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It's a eucalyptus leaf ficus. They're quite hardy, though in Colorado you should bring it indoors in the fall. (Or it's a eucalyptus but I'm assuming you already know what a eucalyptus smells like.) The ficus is cool because they have a process called guttation--basically a plant sweating process. They excrete extra moisture. From the soil and root ...


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Other than chill requirement, blueberries are primarily pollinated by bees - the pollen is quite sticky and therefore not easy for wind to move it around, so although they are self pollinating, the bee/insect intermediary is essential, see here https://entomology.ces.ncsu.edu/small-fruit-insect-biology-management/blueberry-pollinators/


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Blueberries are self-pollinating, but a big part of self-pollination is environmental. This is a good article describing conditions affecting self-pollination and being indoors without wind and pollinating insects would very likely reduce the chance of pollination.


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Specifically about your blueberry: According to this resource what you might be missing is the "chill hours" below 45º F which is really a likely difference between indoors and outdoors. Also the lighting indoors is not likely the same as the comment mentions. Find your thrill with blueberry chill! And more generally: Plants can be sensitive to ...


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You might not like this, but the more traditional/practical way to get fruit in the winter from many plants is to can, dehydrate, freeze, pickle, or lacto-ferment the vegetables. If you're not traditional or practical, that's awesome. Some vegetables will store through the winter: e.g. Red-seeded Citron watermelons (I had one store 18 months), winter ...


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You have not mentioned where you are, but it is certainly possible to grow Nightshades (tomatos and peppers are in this family) in Winter and get fruit, provided there us adequate heating and sunlight. The yields will drop off considerably though. The rule of thumb I was taught us 1% more light = 1 % more growth, so shorter winter hours and lower solar ...


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I once volunteered at a greenhouse that tried to provide fresh tomatoes to local restaurants throughout the winter. We were able to keep the tomatoes growing, but they stopped producing after a few months because we couldn't afford to heat the all-glass greenhouse at a suitably warm (75 F) temperature. Because the house got to below 50 F at night, the fruits ...


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