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1

This is a Lonicera japonica ‘Aureoreticulata’, a.k.a. goldnet honeysuckle. Some info from internet: (beware, there is occasionally a contradiction between sources) From Missouri Botanical Gardens: Noteworthy Characteristics: Lonicera japonica is a vigorous, deciduous, twining vine. 'Aureoreticulata', sometimes commonly called goldnet honeysuckle. is noted ...


3

This is definitely an arum. I agree with Bamboo that it's probably Arum italicum, although it could be a similar species of Arum such as A. maculatum. Regardless, the answer to the question of "Are they poisonous to dogs?" is YES. Arums have insoluble calcium oxalate crystals in all parts of the plant. If a dog (or other pet or human) eats part of ...


1

Most likely Arum italicum but the leaves look rather discoloured, pale and somewhat yellowish. Have you applied weedkiller at all, or maybe its suffered because of the long dry spell throughout end of March and April..its an Arum of some description for sure, as is the one with plain green leaves. It is not a shrub, Arum are tuberous rooted herbaceous ...


0

Could well be totally wrong, but it looks vaguely like a single-flowered Philadelphus. Take a look at these images.


3

Patches of blackberries seem to nurse a lot of other plants, because they are protected by the thorns from lawnmowers or animals that would otherwise like to eat them. Based on the leaves I would say you have some sort of thimbleberry (e.g., Rubus parviflorus). They are native to your region. If you can wait until it bears fruit you can see if you like the ...


4

That’s an Arisaema tortuosum, a whipcord cobra lily, fittingly named for the very elongated spadix. While in many cobra lilies the spathe, the tube-petal-like part around the spadix, takes the show, here the unusually long spadix -which carries the actual flowers - is eye-catching.


3

This is in the sedge family (Cyperaceae) rather than the grass family (Poaceae). Use this helpful mnemonic device for classifying grass-like plants: Sedges have edges, and rushes are round, But grasses have nodes from their tips to the ground. (source) If you roll the stem of a grass-like plant between your fingers, it will either feel round and smooth, ...


3

You are right, it would appear to be Acer campestre, the field maple. Given where you are, I suspect the explanation is not the very wet weather we had during May, but the very dry and warm 6 weeks or so that preceded it. It's a tree that's been planted less than a year, and for the first two years, it will need copious watering during dry spells,especially ...


1

Yeah they are brambles and they will spread like hell if you don't take measures. They are hard to remove because of the thorns, best is to find some good gloves and use shears to cut off pieces of 30-50 cm.


2

It's a Rhododendron - this type was previously known as Azalea, but now they're all called Rhododendron. Azalea types can be deciduous or evergreen, and have smaller leaves than what's always been called Rhododendron. The flower colour is relatively unusual - it might be Rhododendron Encore 'Autumn Sunburst pictured here https://www.gardenia.net/plant/...


0

Azaleas, but not a variety I recognize from the Houston area. They like acid soil so the limestone gravel would usually not be used on them.


2

It is Hydrangea macrophylla, one of the lace cap varieties rather than a 'mophead' type. They are deciduous and prefer partial or dappled shade in soil that does not dry out frequently, and need plenty of space because, as you mention, they get rather large over time. They should not be hard pruned or pruned at all if possible, with only dead wood removed in ...


2

Looks to me like Centranthus ruber (aka red valerian). If it likes you, it will self-seed, sometimes to the extent to become a nuisance. More information here.


4

More info after a couple years of living with this Macrocarpa hedge. Parched They literally suck the ground dry. Lawn grass won't grow under them, and even within 10 metres grass looks stunted. The leeward side of the hedge is a great place for stacking firewood to dry. Roots are invasive and far ranging - digging in an above-grade garden box reveals ...


12

It is a rubber fig (Ficus elastica). It's funny that you say it is an outdoor plant, because in my climate (Europe) it is an indoor plant (so I didn't expect this one), I have one in my living room. It contains, like all fig plants, white milky sap which can irritate the skin so be careful when pruning it. It propagates very easy by cuttings. Mine was a tip ...


2

Plant 1 It is hard to guess without closer look to the foliage, so I am going to split my pick: Juniperus 70% Chamacyparis 15% Thuja 15% This reason that I favor juniperus is that many plants of that species have that gorgeous "windswept" look, the look seen on the original photo. Plant 2 Picea abies 'Nidiformis' Well-known and in demand dwarf ...


3

Possibly Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple' (Smokebush) or similar purple cultivar, though some of the leaves don't look quite right - a bit too pointed, maybe? On the other hand, the stems look right. Check out the photos here. If it is a cotinus, you'll know for sure when it flowers.


3

The shrubs are spirea, and assuming that the first picture was taken in late summer and the second one this spring, then they're probably the cultivar Gold Mound. Of course, they could also be one of the other dozen or two spirea cultivars common in the nursery trade. Their flowers should be rosy or dusky-rose clusters.


0

I found a couple of possibilities. If you can add a close-up of the top surface of one leaf, that might be helpful in confirming or ruling these out. Red tip photinia (Photinia x fraseri) (image source) Japanese andromeda (Pieris japonica) - young leaves are red in some cultivars (image from this article) Both are evergreen shrubs with some red leaves ...


1

This is a lilac, a member of the genus Syringa. Based on leaf shape and flower color, it could be Persian lilac (Syriga x persica) or common lilac (Syringa vulgaris), or another variety.


2

Yes, that's a rhododendron. Yup.


2

It's not Elaeagnus, the leaves are too small and not leathery enough and the growth habit is wrong. It's most likely a Euonymus variety - judging by its growth habit, it's more likely to be Euonymus fortunei, perhaps the variety 'Emerald and Gold' (sometimes called green and gold) rather than E.japonica, which tends to grow much taller without spreading out ...


4

Your shrub appears to be a Hydrangea macrophylla lacecap variety, judging by the flower on the top left of the image. These do often have dead sticks sticking out from previous years and should be pruned back to the base. You might find you can just snap them off with your fingers though. Your plant does look a little stunted - the flowers are smaller than ...


0

Looks like "snowball viburnum". Many clusters of white flowers in spring . It will get 20 ft. tall if not pruned. The limited number of blooms indicates it was pruned at the wrong time.


2

Junipers; there are several varities sold for landscaping .


2

Yes, this looks very much like Berberis thunbergii "Atropurpurea". It's a tough plant that can be cut hard back if it gets too big. Mind the prickles.


3

Yes, this is a hosta. The somewhat heart-shaped (lanceolate or ovate) leaves with the district veins following the leaf shape is quite telling and so are the upright (in your picture bent over) scapes with the flowers towering over the greenery. Your specimen’s color pale purple is a frequent color, hosta breeds bloom typically in the white to purple. If you ...


4

It's a climbing bean. Its habit is to stretch up to find something to climb on, and it will continue zooming upwards until it maybe hits your door handle and then tie onto it. Best place for it is outside with a tall stick to keep it company.


0

Chameleon weed. Super invasive, and I've become allergic to it's oils so I can't even mow the lawn when it comes out in the spring/summer anymore. VERY hard to get rid of because it's a rhizome plant (and I don't know where the mother root is based so it's not like I can get someone to dig out the original plant). Definitely rec'd killing it off if you can. ...


7

The bulge behind the flower (I forget the technical name) makes it look like some kind of campion. Take a look at Silene latifolia (white campion) here.


2

Assuming that your region has temperatures that go below -18 C, then the plant is a cultivar of Vinca minor, possibly' Illumination' (if temperatures never get below -15 C or so, then it's possibly Vinca major). The plants are evergreen, and both species will spread along the ground, rooting at each node on a stem. A single plant can cover a large area in a ...


2

It could be Prunella vulgaris, commonly known as Selfheal - an identifying feature is that there should be a pair of small leaves directly beneath the flower - I cannot tell whether they are present from the photo. If it is selfheal and you have a large patch, a weedkiller containing dicamba and/or mecoprop should be applied, preferably on a warm day, and ...


1

The one on the right is what I recognise as Mentha spicata or spearmint. I don't recognise the one on the left as a spearmint, not sure what it is - does it smell of mint when you bruise a leaf? If it does, it may well be a variety with the common name Chocolate Mint. There are images of various mint varieties here https://delishably.com/spices-seasonings/...


0

Looks like squash / pumpkin / gourds. They are going to get way too big for that pot. Mabey grow one in the pot .


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