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Unfortunately there are more species of acacia than you could shake a stick at. A lot more detail than fuzzy photos of seedlings will be required to narrow down an identification. It will probably be some time before your specimens produce a flower; and it is the flower and other characteristics of maturity that will be needed. One thing to do is to look up ...


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Its Gazania, but they are not winter flowering, though I suppose it depends on what part of the world you are in and how cold or hot your weather gets. In the UK, these are grown mostly as half hardy annuals during summer, meaning they will not tolerate any frost. There are a large number of varieties of this plant - some are listed here https://www.rhs.org....


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London Plane tree http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/130238/STMP2011_150501-PartB.PDF page B19 in general, search the .gov.au domain with "tree" and "council" and the name of the town or city.


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It's hard to tell the size of them from a picture, but they are rodent. Either Mice or Rats. How to Identify Rat Faeces? Rat scat is often found in large groupings. They are about the size and shape of an a single peanut Mice scat are much smaller than a single peanut. They are elongated and with a sharp end. Know that you live in the PNW, I know there ...


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It looks like a Corokia cotoneaster. I think yours is too gone to treat. I think it was overwatered. See if it is waterlogged. Does that pot have holes in the bottom. If not get it a new pot. But, I would start over with a new plant. Those small leaves can easily dry out, but they are known to be drought resistant. There is the possibility that the ...


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It looks like the images were taken on the Avenida Delfim Moreira where there are lots of Ficus. From a list of trees used as street trees in Rio we note that one native (F. tomentella) and two exotic (F. lyrata and F. elastica) species are used. The most frequently used is F. lyrata; also given that F. elastica is a more shapely tree and has firmly rounded ...


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We can say pretty definitely that it is not eggplant aubergine. Look up eggplant images and you will find first that the eggplant leaf is kinda dull where these are shiny, eggplant leaf is distinctly lobed (bumpy edges) even when juvenile, and the petioles really stand erect where your leaf shoots are quite horizontal. Since you presumably used seed from a ...


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This appears to be a Parlour Palm, Chamaedorea elegans. I don't like the look of the blackened parts, that might indicate over rather than underwatering at some point, but you can cut out damaged fronds at the base, where they arise from. I think you should move it away from the window - it's not clear whether it gets any sun, but they don't like direct ...


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I believe it is floribunda by the breeder Christian Bédard. It was introduced in 2012 by Weeks Rose, they call it Ketchup and Mustard. The flower is much better than the name. If the rose has been in her garden well before 2012, then I am wrong.


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It is an orchid. Even you say it looks like a orchid flower. You states it's not as showy as an orchid, but there are actually 20,000 different species of orchids in the world, not all of them are showy. Those that are showy and easy to grow are the ones we are most familiar with. If you want to know the exact species, either waiting until it flowers ...


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It's a Dracena. Get it in some nice potting mix with lots of drainage. The roots will take off with time. For the time being, don't fertilise. Also when you water it remember the size of the roots. Little roots can't take up a huge pots worth of water. You want the soil to have plenty of air for the roots to breath. If you water log them with too ...


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That is a very familiar tree to me, living in London UK - it looks remarkably like a London Plane tree, Platanus acerifolia. To my surprise, according to this Wiki entry https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platanus_%C3%97_acerifolia, this is a commonly used street tree in parts of Australia, including Sydney, so that seems to be what it is. The trouble with ...


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It is the Great Fountain Garden at Hampton Court Palace. Lots of pictures at Google Maps here. The conical trees are yew topiary. According to https://findthatlocation.com/television-show/downton-abbey/location/1156: Hampton Court Palace East Molesey Lady Edith and Bertie Pelham discuss Brancaster Castle Episode 5 Lady Edith and ...


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That looks more like a pelleted rat poison. Something like Final Rodenticide.


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Marlothistella stenophylla Also called Mesembryanthemum stenophyllum or Ruschia stenophylla It is not very common. It should at some point grow a caudex. A caudex of a plant is a stem, but the term is also used to mean a rootstock and particularly a basal stem structure from which new growth arises. You might already be able to feel one forming at the ...


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I think it's possibly Lathraea clandestina at the bud stage, although this usually appears in spring rather than autumn - how the flowers develop will confirm or deny this ID. Its common name is purple toothwort, and it's rather uncommon in ordinary gardens, usually appearing near trees or in wooded areas, though you can actually buy it at garden centres. ...


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This looks very much like what Californians call "iceplant". Wikipedia says that its real name is now Carpobrotus edulis, that its former name was "Mesembryanthemum edule", and that it is native to the South of Africa. Wikipedia is also where I found this picture of it: (photo by Uzoma Ozurumba) I should note this picture makes the plant look much more ...


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I'm pretty sure that the plant is either Impatiens balsamina or a close relative. Note that I. balsamina is native to S and SE Asia, so if I'm right it's a garden escapee in your son's garden. It's grown as an annual in northern climates and considered "old fashioned" in most of the US. The common names for I. balsamina are Double Balsam (if flowers are ...


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The difficulty with this piece of plant (and yes, it might be a Hoya) is its length and the fact that the rooty material is along the length. Added to that, if you're in the northern hemisphere, now is not really the time to start cuttings off this plant, its best done in spring and early summer. That said, we are where we are; I can only suggest that you ...


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Bonjour ! Je reconnais bien la 'pomme de Revel' (Revel = Tallinn) En Estonnie son nom est 'Valge Klaar' En France le nom officiel et 'Transparente blanche' mais il est rarement utilisé ! Bonne tartes mais c'est mieux en compote ! Denis-Jacques Chevalier English: I recognize the' apple of Revel '(Revel = Tallinn) in Estonnie its name is' Valge Klaar 'in ...


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From what i can see, it looks like it might be a Hoya. It appears from the picture the orginial grower may have been doing the braiding of the vines stems and they were using a bamboo stick to aid in the process. Easy to do with a Hoya vine. Also Hoya have the most amazing flowers, but first it needs to be in a pot for a few years with its root ...


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It's hard to be certain of variety because there are so many which have been created in the last few years, but whichever variety it may be, its definitely a prostrate one, evidenced by its growth habit. If you only want a low hedge, it'll be fine, but it is likely to remain up to about a foot high for the next ten years, possibly reaching 1-2 feet at ...


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My mother gave us a plant just like this many years ago I took it to florist and landscapers nobody could ever tell me what kind of plant it was It grew to be big and beautiful it never flowered we had it probably 15 years before it just started dying no matter what I did I do look forward to others answers for this question


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Sometimes a branch of S. praealtum will start cresting. This creates a very unique look and is suited to a special pot. (you can break off that stem in early spring and let it root in its new home - w/o water for a few weeks)


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Looks like white wax scale infestation - you may or may not have noticed ants on the plant as well, coming for the honeydew they produce. As the infestation progresses, you may find the plant develops sooty mould, which is also related to the presence of this pest. From what I've read, I believe in Australia you have something called 'white oil' which is a ...


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Yes - you have a scale infestation. The shield shaped objects attached to the branches are adult scales - there may be crawlers on the soft parts such as leaves and stems. The ants are attracted by the honeydew the scale produce, so they aren't a problem; get rid of the scale and the ants will disappear. You may be able to remove the ones on the twiggy ...


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The bottom one is one of the plantains and not something you want in a pot, remove it before it drops its seed everywhere. No. 1 looks like new shoots of a woody plant or shrub of some sort - is there something else growing there that's previously been cut back?


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all of the seeds not labeled as rose, look like some sort of muskmelon... no real way to identify them until you plant them and see what grows.


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Yes Aphids is correct... you can control with just soap and water, or you can go to an organic like neem oil, pyrethrum, or spinosad; those will probably require less attention... use something that is available and legal in your jurisdiction.


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It might be Agave desmettiana 'silver Star', but there are hundreds of variegated agaves of varying sizes - this link https://www.plantdelights.com/apps/photo-gallery/agaves_-_variegated_cultivars shows many of them, including 'Silver Star' shown lower down.


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Those are aphids. Get your spray out and get rid of them quickly. I've had chilli plants and they're quite susceptible to these critters especially in dry climate and almost always after rainfall. Now you could either use a pesticide or buy a box of ladybugs or parasitic wasps and unleash them onto your plant. Also, it's best to get rid of them early on ...


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Ironically found it: "sedum praealtum"


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This website confirms it is a "Black Nightshade" They grow green or deep purple berries which are poisonous to most animals. Leaves are also poisonous. If you have any pet I recommend to pull it out with gloves or use a weed killer.


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This is not a tomato plant. Although if my assessment is correct, it is of the same nightshade family Solanaceae. I agree with your assessment black or blackberry nightshade (Solanum nigrum) or as we sometimes know it in Australia... deadly nightshade, due to its toxic effect when grazed by livestock. The leaves and fruit are also toxic to humans. ...


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