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Solanum nigrum yes. Annual. "the toxin levels may also be affected by the plant's growing conditions" says Wikipedia. So the next season's plants may be more toxic. - dont eat.


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The stem and the connection of the leaves to the stem looks different. It is possibly a Nolina or a Yucca, completely unrelated genera. Nolinas will develop a caudex. If not, this may be a juvenile form. Both genera will develop a trunk anyway and look palm-like. Clivias remain short, they offset at ground level rather than growing tall, and their roots are ...


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It looks to match Haworthiopsis (formerly Haworthia) The outer surface of the leaves is smoothly curved, no vertical line in the middle. The dots are nearly in lines, and the inside of the leaves are spotted as well so: Haworthiopsis attenuata, formerly Haworthia attenuata


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Rugosa roses are characterized by rugose leaves, which means deeply creased. They have heavily etched veins in their leaves. That looks more like a hybrid spinosissima Rose, and may have been a desirable ornamental. They do spread by suckers, however. Without seeing the flowers, it is impossible to ID The cultivar to know exactly what it was. I would have ...


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It's not possible to see all the details clearly, but it appears to be one of the shield bugs, sometimes called stink bugs (although most of them don't stink at all, the one that does is Halyomorpha halys, the brown marmorated stink bug). Hard to say which one it is because coloration and pattern changes at different times, as well as not being able to see ...


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Lovely pictures, Echeveria or a sempervivum.


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Carissa macrocarpa, Natal plum. I got this by copying your picture straight i to the PlantNet app. Cheating!


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Carpet beetles This is not a plant pest, although on rare occasions they would lay eggs in dead plant matter. Management of carpet beetles


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This plant belongs to the family Cucurbitaceae which includes: Cucumber Gourds Watermelon Plants in this family are sprawling vines that typically have tendrils, and all cucurbits have bright yellow flowers, except for the bottle gourd. I suspect this is a Cucumber vine from the leaves in the photo, although it might be one of the many Gourds that belong ...


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Carissa macrocarpa or Carissa bispinosa Aka Natal plum or large Num Num


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From what leaves are visible, I suspect this is likely a Camellia fruit - what you're seeing is a ripe seed case. Camellias do produce fruits, though not usually very many http://www.camellias.pics/fruit-et-graines-gb.php. If it is Camellia, you will have seen flowers in late winter or spring - they may be red, pink, pink and white, white or yellow ...


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The reason ot is called Elephant Plant or Elephant Food is because it is indigenous to the Eastern Cape Province of Sourh Africa and the local elephants feed off it. I have not seen them bloom and I grew up there. Portulaca not Crassula or what is known as spekboom in SA, which has lovely pale pink flowers. There is another type of Portulaca which has ...


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Answer edited to reflect new research I think you might have horseweed AKA Canadian fleabane (Conyza canadensis). This plant can grow to nearly 2m high, blooms late in our summer, and flowers only from the top, which matches your weed since you haven't seen any flowers yet. I've checked the Invasive Species Compendium, and this plant has indeed been ...


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Yes it is Echeveria! But I'm not sure which variety, maybe 'Fleur Blanc' or 'Lola'. You can use a ready made succulents mix for the soil. But it's best to make your own simple mix. Start with good quality potting soil as the base then add extra agricultural sand (washed and graded coarse granular sand) and a hand full of grit to allow air flow to the ...


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You have a variegated Hoya plant. It is a trailing plant that is fairly easy to care for. It like bright light, but will tolerate most indoor growing conditions. It has thick almost succulent leaves, so it is best to treat it like you would a succulent. Allow it to dry out before giving it water again. Water less in winter than in summer. Hoya are ...


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You have Basil, I can tell by the leaves.


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They are not gender specific - each cluster of flowers bears both male and female flowers, but an individual tree is not capable of pollinating itself. Fruit production is normally low, but increases with hand pollination; if you only have one tree and there are no others in the vicinity, you probably need to plant at least one more. Further scientific ...


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It appears to be Acalypha wilkesiana forma circinata. The dentate/ serrate, variegated margins are quite distinctive. I'm not familiar with this form but the genus in general are hardy, easy to grow plants.


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The second one is a Codiaeum, commonly known as croton - it needs some sun and prefers high humidity. Keep it away from heat sources, and water when the surface of the soil feels just about dry to the touch - when you do water, water well, and empty out any outer pot or tray after 30 minutes. Further growing advice here https://www.almanac.com/plant/croton# ...


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Let me just say, I have chickens and they get coated in these, just like my dogs do. Actually kind of funny seeing their whole heads coated with them like a helmet. Long story short, I have chickens and I have tons of this weed in my back yard. So get your backyard chickens for the eggs, not for these weeds. :-)


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The upright habit of this plant indicates that it is a variegated Peperomia obtusifolia. Peperomias have rather thick leaves since they use the leaves as water storage, in contrast to other thinner leaved species which do not store moisture in the leaves. You can quickly test thick from thin leaves by attempting to bend a leaf - if it feels rubbery then it ...


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It's ginger of the genus Zingiber, probably Z. officinale, of the Zingiberaceae family. It's too tall/vertical to be a Hosta and much too large to be Lily of the Valley. It has tall vertical leaves that have those distinctive ridges. Shell ginger, Alpinia, has leaves that are smoother and the plant is not quite as vertical as Zingiber. Wikipedia article ...


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Deutzia scabra, (cultivar might be 'Plena')is a deciduous shrub with somewhat cascading limbs covered in fragrant white (sometimes pink) star shaped flowers. Tolerates almost any soil, but does best when it is moist & rich. It is native to Japan and China, but has been a classic in western gardens for many years. It is weird if you found this in ...


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Phlebodium aureum, AKA Blue Star Fern. Like most ferns they want moist, not wet, soil at all times. When the top of the soil becomes dry down to the second knuckle of your index finger it is time to water again. Water until water comes out the bottom of the pot, then stop. Dump out any excess water out of the catch basin. It is best to give this plant ...


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Nice photos, the adult plant on the left with the pink flowers - looks like a "cane begonia". The seedling might change their leaves as they grow.


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Looks like a fern. that's a start for ID


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It does appear to be Chamaenerion angustifolia, previously known as Epilobium angustifolia. Called fireweed in the US and Canada & rosebay willowherb in the UK. It is called fireweed, because it is one of the first plants/flowers to grow after a forest fire. It is native to the boreal forest of the Northern Hemisphere. It has a preference for ...


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