6

I know this has been answered and accepted, but I disagree strongly. If your Hydrangea is an H. macrophylla variety, deadheading isn't something you'd do, particularly not in your part of the world. The last thing you want to do is force any new growth in July, and the theory with the spent flowerheads is they're left on all winter to give added protection ...


6

I'm almost certain that what you're seeing is the difference in color between old growth and new growth. Hydrangeas (I mean H. macrophylla) always bloom from the current year's growth. So after a season, or during winter, the plant can be cut back and the lush new growth in spring will bloom. In your pic, the plant looks like its stems were pruned at some ...


6

The previously existing, fully formed and open flowers would retain the original colour, although natural fading or slight alteration can be seen over time - application of substances to alter colour between pink and blue should be made 6 weeks prior to the flower being fully open, and that will be when the buds are forming. That's the latest time to attempt ...


5

If you only did it a couple of weeks ago, that was a bit late for a hardwood cutting. You can follow Stormy's instructions regarding this particular cutting to give it a second chance, but you can also propagate Hydrangea from soft or semi ripe cuttings as well as hardwood, see link here, under propagation, which has secondary embedded links regarding how to ...


5

Hydrangea arborescens 'Annabelle' flower on new wood, therefore you can safely prune off as much material as you wish in late Winter... This species blooms on new wood, and may be pruned back close to the ground in late winter each year to revitalize and to encourage vigorous stem growth and best form. Plants may die to the ground in harsh winters. If not ...


4

Hydrangeas won't flower well if you are using fertilizer with more nitrogen than phosphorous and potassium. Is this hydrangea in the middle of your lawn receiving lawn fertilizer? Lawn fertilizer has too much nitrogen for promoting flowers/fruit/reproductive growth. You'll get lots of healthy vegetative growth (leaves, stems) but very few flowers. Also, ...


4

Soil humidity is not the term to use. Humidity is the amount of water vapour in the air. Moisture level is what you are measuring. The tool you are using likely measures conductivity which increases when more water ions are present. A self watering container uses capillary action to maintain a steady amount of water in the soil. Depending on the amount ...


4

Hydrangea varieties are not known to have allelopathic properties, and their presence nearby should therefore not cause any problems to the plants you mention, nor any others, although their need for water and nutrients might deprive anything smaller growing nearby. However, you mention cyanogenic glycosides in relation to Hydrangea; as you rightly say, ...


4

These are not cuttings, they are simply new growth coming off the roots of the plant, and as such, are not suitable for propagation purposes. You can propagate hydrangeas though, and there are three ways to do it; soft, semi ripe or hard wood cuttings, and all need to be of some length, not just little buds. Each type of cutting is taken at a different ...


3

Hydrangea somehow evolved to be resistant to Juglone that the walnut produces to discourage competition by its own babies and many other plants. Hydrangea learned to be able to grow under walnuts, in the shade and in thin soil. The trick for planting plants is grouping like needs with like needs. Hydrangea has no 'trick' chemicals to protect other plants ...


3

Hydrangea is also my favorite! Yours looks really good for an indoor hydrangea. I have many varieties growing outdoors and occasionally have bushes pop up errant color flowers, like yours. This happens more with the newer varieties I planted, and is possibly due to its genetics from hybridizing and cross breeding. Leave the blue flower, it is interesting ...


3

Hello: I have lots of hydrangea in my gardens and this issue was fascinating to me. The bottom photo is absolutely a lacecap flower, not a mophead, so I did some research and found this on ask.extension.org Hydrangeas are usually propagated by cuttings so the only way they would change from mophead would be via mutation and it would be unusual for several ...


3

These are two different varieties of Hydrangea - they're both H. macrophylla, but the second picture shows a lacecap variety, whereas the first shows a 'mophead' type. Lacecaps flower exactly as shown in your picture, and don't develop the full head of open flowers you see in the first picture. Guidance and images on types of hydrangea here http://www....


3

Hmm, an interesting collection of misinformation! It depends what variety of Hydrangea, is the answer - if you have Hydrangea macrophylla (those with large, mophead flowers or lace cap flowers), you don't cut those until growth begins in spring. When you see new shoots, that's the time to trim off dead flowerheads from the previous year, along with dead bits ...


3

There are several varieties of hydrangeas. I am guessing you have one that only blooms on old wood. Use one/two tablespoons of Holly-Tone fertilizer in early May and once again in late June. I also recommend putting your used coffee grounds in the soil, hydrangeas love that. Do not fertilize after August. In the winter after a good frost, cover the ...


3

Many of the older varieties of garden hydrangeas set flowers that can be killed by bad winters and late frosts in spring. I live in nyc and didn't get any flowers last season. This year I got flowers on one bush and not the other one(different varieties). These plants also flower on previous year's growth. They should not be pruned back because blooms ...


3

Cut them at the leaf joint below the lowest point that the flower branches from. These leaves have viable growth buds at their bases. It's good not to take off more leaves than you have to, especially when the plant recently put so much energy into flowering.


3

If the leaves look fine, it was probably caused by dehydration. Mine did that recently, as well. Cut the flower heads off, and keep the plant well watered.


3

You have basically answered your question: I haven't watered [...] them yet. They aren’t dead, they are thirsty! The soil is a bit out of focus in your photos, but it seems very dry. Not all plant sellers will take good care of their stock, especially if you bought them in a grocery store instead of at a florists’. So I recommend you give the pots a ...


3

You want to acidify your soil, so sulfur because that is used to make sulfuric acid.


2

I'm not surprised the flowers are in trouble - the whole plant is. The pot's too small - suggest you turn it out and pot into something bigger, with at least an inch all round and at the bottom for 'empty', fresh potting compost so that the rootball can grow into it. There's a bit of healthy, new leaf growth struggling to come on at the base on the right of ...


2

Depends what part of the world you're in and whether your hydrangea is a paniculata or macrophylla type. Its quite hard to tell from the dead flower whether its H. macrophylla or not - they're the varieties which have either round, ball shaped flowerheads (called mophead varieties) or flattish flower heads with florets round the edge (known as lacecap ...


2

Well, I just learned something new! Bigleaf Hydrangea is extremely salt tolerant! Sounds like the sun exposure is fine, partial shade is best anyway. I would build a plant bed by 'fruffing' up the soil, double digging and allowing it to become a raised bed! Are there any trees near the area you want to plant? Roots of Hydrangea are only a few inches ...


2

This looks like a 'floral hydrangea'...one that was purchased in a floral shop? If that is true then what is happening makes sense. You transplanted into a larger pot (good size, what soil did you use). Did you purchase this plant already planted in this pot? If so then the florist transplanted it to be able to charge more, which is fine. What they ...


2

Be careful, these might also be new branches growing! Can't tell without an image. If your hydrangea grows roots above ground, another solution would be to add some compost or potting soil to the plants' feet.


2

I've done this where I was able to retain most all color. Bring your stems (cut way down the stem to a main stem) inside and cut at an angle, put bottoms of the stems in an inch or two of water. Allow water to evaporate, slowly. Slow drying is the secret. I've done lots and lots of drying of flowers and even using silica. Hydrangeas need to dry SLOWLY. ...


2

Two possibilities - Hydrangeas of this type prefer to be out of the midday sun, especially if the uv levels where you live are high - morning and evening, or dappled sun is fine. Second, you say you're watering daily, but that doesn't necessarily mean the root ball of the plant is getting enough water. You don't say how you're watering and how long for, but ...


1

Your branch buds were already determined to be vegetative and not roots. Cut just above your bud node at an angle sloping down so water will drip off between the buds not on the buds. Leave a 1/4 inch above the buds and get rid of all above that node. Then stick it back into the soil...really should use sterile potting soil, don't make it yourself. Keep ...


1

I can share my experience with you. I have hydrangea in my courtyard where is gets sun for only part of the day. I have had them for 4 years and have not really fertilized them much (I probably should). I had flowers all 4 years and they are particularly doing well this year. I did prune the dead flowers and I was told that they should only be pruned ...


1

Having checked, your 'forever and ever' flowering hydrangea plants are said to bloom on old and new wood, unlike the usual H. macrophylla, which might mean they repeat bloom - but not necessarily in practice, according to some forums on the web. These plants are available in the States, and are just becoming available here - the RHS was selling them, so you ...


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