8

If you are going for a low-maintenance garden that will not require humans to be there to care for them, I think your best bet is to go with a native plant garden. It will need care while you are establishing it, but once the plants have developed a strong root system, they will require almost no care. Have you seen the Project Noah? There is a page on ...


6

When I grew rhubarb in England, it thrived without any help. Of course, the climate in England is temperate. It doesn't grow very well at all in climates approaching sub-tropical and warmer. Even if there is a noticeable cold season, rhubarb will find it difficult to thrive when summers are hot. The humidity level might be important too. I've attempted ...


6

I grow it in the UK where it thrives. I'd suggest putting it in a shady area under some trees or shrubs. Maybe you could grow it in late winter / spring and autumn as an annual? It needs cold dormancy (induce in late summer by putting the root in a bag and in a freezer). Then in late summer when it is cooling down - plant it and harvest in late autumn / ...


5

I had this same problem in zone 7 USA. I checked with the local agriculture guy and he said it was probably due to zinc deficiency. He advised applying zinc and 10-10-10 fertilizer in February. I did that and it seems to be helping. I picked up a bunch yesterday that Hurricane Matthew blew off this week and while green they were fully developed. I will ...


5

For tomatoes: yes, they don't like very high temperature. On professional greenhouses, it is customary to shadows them on summer. I think aubergine could have similar problem, and heat could block the growth of the fruits, so when they have better temperature they could take strange forms, or not growth again. I don't think peppers would have problems (but ...


5

Based on all three links that you have provided, as well as the availability of the said plants in Mumbai, these plants will not only survive, but thrive, as well as clean the air. They are low maintenance too. I'm already growing them in my south facing window in Mumbai. Very Important: Remember to remove the plates under the pots of the 'outdoor' plants, ...


5

I grow it very successfully here with summer temperatures to 42 Celsius. We also get sub-zero winters with frosts common. I have mine under bird netting, which believe it or not reduces direct sunlight. I planted mine into a sand mixed with horse manure. I water virtually daily in summer and a lot less in winter. I cannot stop them raging. I am in Australia ...


5

I'm recently retired here in southern Brasil from Manitoba, Canada. I too miss rhubarb crumble, and of course nobody ever has heard of rhubarb here. I brought some seeds from Canada, and started the plants outside in a planter in mid winter (July here). They grew amazingly well! I even managed to savour a rhubarb crumble, then the weather got really hot, and ...


4

My sun-room doesn't get enough sunlight for rhubarb. I went to a local nursery that sells rhubarb and the plants were thriving outside in 90F heat. The only difference: they had a very porous soil vs. the clay I had tried growing mine in. I am now successfully growing rhubarb outside in 80-90 degree F heat. The soil MUST be porous. (+ daily watering)


4

Pandorea jasminoides is its real name - an evergreen twining climber with fragrant flowers in spring and summer, but it is not hardy unless your winter temperatures do not fall below 15°C, which I think is about 60°F. Ultimate height, where it survives, 4-8 metres by 1-1.5 metres wide. Pruning, if necessary, should be carried out after it has flowered. More ...


4

Providing some shade during the hottest part of the day (usually roughly between 11-3 pm) if the sun is shining would be beneficial in such high temperatures, but sometimes, it's hot without sunshine, in which case, there's not much point in providing shade. If its dry and particularly windy as well, and the plants are already wilting, you certainly need to ...


4

Plant them behind the north face of a fence, shed or your home. Although the USDA zones are generally accurate, there are micro-zones all over the place that can be as much as one or even two whole zones warmer or colder. You may not get as deep a cold as actually being a full zone north, but the average winter temp of the north face of your house and it's ...


3

Shock causes it to lose its leaves and flowers. The most common causes are low light levels, frost, and repotting. It sounds like the latter was the cause, and it's now recovered with leaves and flowers. Bougainvillaeas originally came from Brazil so it's a semi-tropical plant. Therefore the best time to trim it is when there's no danger of frost, and ...


3

Escoce's advice is great. I'll just add that hops produce best if they have a chill period of 30-90 days. If you find that they aren't producing well even after planing on the north side of your fence, you could try banking ice around the base of the plant daily for a month. This is a trick that can successfully trick a lilac into blooming in zone 10 and ...


3

Side-oats Grama and Blue Grama are both native to Texas and known to occur in Travis County. They tolerate full sun and dry soil, should grow readily from seed when sown on warm soil in the spring, and reach 1-2 feet in height. I had good experience with side-oats last year even after sowing in late June (!) at the beginning of a blazing-hot Kansas summer. ...


2

The state of North Carolina says you can't grow rhubarb anywhere in the state except in mountainous areas. That said, my wife and I have been developing a method for over 18 years and got to the point last year that we grew about 300 pounds of rhubarb in eastern North Carolina about an hour east of Raleigh. It can be done, but you have to totally rethink ...


2

You'll be fine Kavi! 3' deep beds? What did you use for their structure? Bigger question is; are your beds connected to the original soil? Did you break up the surface of this soil before back filling your raised beds? What soil did you use to backfill? What have you added? Worms need decomposed! organic matter to eat and derive energy. You ...


1

This is in zone 4-5, Pacific NW. Mid June? The flowers are these adorable little japanese lantern looking things with pink/purple/green...like dried flowers. This is one of the best vines I've ever grown for the purposes you are considering. No diseases, insect problems after 7 years? Truly, don't stand too near! 3' per day is average...


1

I am in the San Francisco/Bay Area and we occasionally get 100 degree days as well. I don't have any shelter in my raised beds to protect from the sun and my peppers and tomatoes do just fine. The only thing I have to do is ensure I am watering them manually (in addition to the automatic drip) so that they don't start wilting. I do have my house fence ...


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