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4

I suppose you might be able to, but I think you'd be well into cell culturing rather than "stick a leaf in damp soil and get a plant" ala African Violet - but I have not tried it (since I've never seen it suggested and it appears from my experience likely to fail.) Division is the only way I've ever propagated hosta, and I don't see your claim that "digging ...


4

Seems they are - they belong to the Asparagacaea family, and are apparently eaten frequently in Japan and other countries. As with many food plants, the young leaves are best - older leaves can become tough, stringy and bitter. Some varieties are used more commonly than others as vegetables, H. seiboldii and H.montana, but they can all be eaten. They'll ...


3

Yes, you can root hosta leaf cuttings but you have to cut the leaf with a bit of the root it is growing from, preferable with a few small roots attached to the cutting. Put it in water, change the water frequently until there are enough roots growing to pot the leaf. I have a Victory hosta single leaf cutting done this way and now potted about a month but am ...


3

A standard way to multiply a mature hosta is by "division" just like most herbaceous perennials. Dig it up, chop up the root ball into several pieces with a spade, and replant them as separate plants. Cutting the root ball with a spade or a knife will cause less damage than trying to pull it apart "carefully." In practice "mature&...


2

According to Wikipedia info, all hostas are edible. But do not trust me or Wikipedia blindly. In any case, I would not eat it too much and too often.


2

Hostas need cold in the winter to come back strongly the next year. They tend to slowly lose vigor if they do not get enough cold. What zone are you in and have the winters been particularly mild lately?


2

Depends how long the ply and soil are sitting on top of the hostas - if its just a short period (2-3 months), they'll be fine, though they may have disappeared or look terrible when uncovered again. If its a lot longer, say 9 months to a year, then its anybody's guess whether they'll grow again - the odds are that they will, but no guarantees.


2

From what you describe, they are likely getting too much sun. They prefer mostly shade, with a moist but not overwet soil, preferably rich in organic material. Mulching helps conserve moisture. Hot afternoon sun is not ideal for them. They should be on the north side of the house, or under trees.


1

Looks like your hosta is in too much sun and/or is not being watered enough. It seems to be one of the blue-leaved hostas, and these hostas are not known to be particularly sun tolerant (the gold-leaves ones can take much more sun than the blue-leaved cultivars). If your hosta is indeed in the shade (about 4 hours or less of sun), then I wouldn't worry about ...


1

Are your Azaleas sitting any deeper than they were before the wall? What kind of wall did you install? These plants are acid loving plants. Concrete causes the pH to be raised. Mortar? You need to send a picture or two. Azaleas are very shallow rooted and putting any more soil over their roots might just kill them. Same with mulch. Hostas do well ...


1

This spring I had transplanted some and had a few leaves with a bit of stem fall off. I figured I would try to propagate them and had about a 40% success rate. I might have had better success if I had paid more attention to them. I just dipped in rooting hormone and put in a pot with a mixture of potting sol, very composted wood chips (basically soil at this ...


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