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7

It's extremely helpful that you included the actual ingredient list in your question, rather than a brandname - thank you! So you know, I grow anything that I eat organically and this question is one of the reasons why I do (the other reason is that I was once a Certified Pesticide Applicator for five years, and the training you receive to get that ...


3

Perilla is an annual herb and can be subject to rust which shows as rust coloured spots. As the spots on the leaves in the picture are light coloured it looks like aphids or spider mites which suck sap. Spider mites are the size of a grain of salt and cluster on the undersides of the leaves. You may need a magnifying glass to see them. They make a web when ...


3

Whether a potting mix drains well or not depends on the characteristics of the components. We have to look carefully at the components of the mix. Many off the shelf products are basically peat and vermiculite and perlite and other stuff which is used extensively by the horticultural industry and for most purposes drains very well because at the microscopic ...


3

Dried herbs are always stronger than fresh, which is why only a small amount is used in cooking, whereas a much larger amount of the fresh herb is needed to give flavour. Depending on the herb, half a teaspoon of dried is roughly equivalent to 2 dessertspoons of chopped fresh herb, as I discovered to my cost many years ago when I used 2 dessertspoons of ...


3

Those tiny grasshopper-looking jerks are thrips. The spots are from thrips piercing the leaf with their mouths and sucking out the contents. As far as I know, the leaves are safe to eat. I would just wash them to remove the buggers and their frass. It’s probably an annual problem because thrips can overwinter under plant debris or mulch. Come spring, ...


2

It looks like your mint has suffered a drought. Likely the top (stems and leaves) will not recover but we might be able to save the root and put your plant back in production. As the pot soil fills with roots, which mints tend to do quite quickly, the faster it will run out of moisture on a warm day. So one process would be to clip off all the dry top ...


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That is a wide range of species with somewhat different needs, though I don't recognize any of them as needing cold or warm stratification or other special treatments. Most lettuces need some light directly on the seeds, so don't bury them just press in the surface.(though some modern breeds or certain seed pre-treatments can avoid the need for light.) ...


2

It looks like one of the stems has died back and some hyphal fungal activity has occurred in that area, rather than a pest infestation - these herbs are usually contained in a plastic outer, which will encourage such activity. Pull out any dead parts left behind - if you've already cut it back and removed the plastic wrap, then air flow should be ...


2

Here's what they look like to me: Holy basil or mint Mint Mint I want to say mint, but it looks a bit different. Not sure. Marjoram, or possibly oregano; if it is a basil, then probably Spicy Globe Bush Some mint-like plants may be other things, such as pennyroyal or horse mint.


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Ocimum basilicum 'cinnamon' is just a variety of basil; it is an annual plant in cooler regions of the world, like ordinary basil, and, like ordinary basil, the taste of the leaves is better before the plant flowers, and once it has flowered, it will more or less stop producing new leaves. As I understand it, the whole plant is fragrant when bruised, rather ...


2

Disclaimer: Before consuming any plant identified via an Internet community, do your own research and confirm the id. Based on the photos alone (scent is a huge factor when identifying herbs), I would classify this as Satureja montana, winter savory. The overall habit is similar to thyme, but it’s larger, more vigorous and the leaves are thinner, albeit a ...


2

I would like to add an answer to this question also, even though the first answer was good, because I might be able to be helpful as well. First, as an aside, this happened to me with some catnip seeds once many, many years ago, where I planted some catnip seeds and didn't know what to expect. My cats were completely uninterested in the plants that resulted....


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Actually there does not seem anything wrong with the basil plant apart from old age. Time to replace it with a younger seedling and allow that to continue to provide leaves. Longer version: there are at least 3 different plants known as "albahaca" in Spanish and Portuguese and Caribbean areas; this one we can see from the crumply leaves and light ...


1

You should smell it when you rub or bruise it, so nothing seems to be wrong with your plant. When it was in the bag and it smelled when you open it, it was probably rubbed by the bag. There was recently a similar question answered by Bamboo, where the OP asked the same for lavender.


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They may not be accustomed to sunlight, so that might have caused a problem, but the main issue is probably lack of water. Water when the surface of the soil feels just about dry to the touch, water well, allow to drain down freely. Check them daily to see if they need water, especially if the weather is hot and sunny, when they might need watering twice a ...


1

It doesn't look like it needs a bigger pot, but cilantro grown indoors does lean over, usually towards the light, and yours probably isn't getting enough light if that's where it usually lives. I can see what looks like a couple of roots on the surface of the soil - if that's what they are and they're attached to the plant, they should be in the soil. If the ...


1

I just checked my rosemary plants (I have about 50) and none of them showed the brown markings on the leaves. Rosemary is one of the toughest plants there is apart from cacti, so I doubt it is a disease, but could be related to your being too kind to it. This plant is designed to live a tough life, surviving drought and poor nutrition and go on to produce ...


1

Quite often plants will react like this when the intensity of the light changes dramatically. Moving plants from a protected warm environment inside to a much brighter spot outside is just like sunburn on the leaves which can't handle the intensity. The plant usually has enough resources that it can gradually abandon the soft "inside" leaves and grow new ...


1

They're seedlings, and seedlings don't cope with sun exposure, they need to be proper little plants with a reasonably well developed root system before they can deal with it. Keep them in dappled shade or shade (although a little early morning or very late evening sun should be okay, but not for long). This is the case for all seedlings, not just lavender. ...


1

The first two plants look like they have slug damage. This is possibly the case with the third, depending on how large the leaf is (right now, it looks like the holes are too small). A good way to confirm is to either visit the garden at night (especially if it's humid/wet) or to put a beer trap under the plants at ground level. You'll either see the slugs ...


1

Fenugreek's botanical name is Trigonella foenum graecum'; it's an annual plant and is in a different plant family (Fabaceae) from Rungia klossii, which is an evergreen perennial in tropical regions, so it would seem these are two different plants. More information on Rungia klossii here https://www.jekkas.com/products/mushroom-plant, but without a botanical ...


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You should note that related plants can share diseases and pests. The two botanical families that this applies to most are the Solanaceae (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, and egg plant) and the Cucurbitaceae (melons, squash, and cucumbers). This means that you should never use the same plot for the same members of these families in successive years. In other ...


1

There are so many different cultivars of mint, I’m wondering if it actually is one. I had one last year that had leaves very like yours which was an apple mint. It was that same bright green colour as yours and softer and shorter than garden mint with slight furring to the leaves. That one smelled very like lemon balm too. I also had a ginger mint, similar ...


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I've always grown my herbs in full sun, so your question has forced me to branch out and learn something new :) Here's a list (with sources) of some herbs. Fortunately, your top three choices are on the list: From The Spruce (whatever that is) Parsley Lemon balm Chives Thyme Mint From BBC Gardener's World Parsly, chives, and mint like in the above list, ...


1

It needs to root into the soil and it needs more water - you really do need to find a pot with drainage holes and transfer it to that, using fresh potting soil to plant it into,then give it a good soak, let it drain down, and after that,keep it watered when the surface of the soil feels dry to the touch. Empty out any outer tray or pot 30 minutes after ...


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Return it - it's more than half the plant that's affected, and there's evidence the same problem is starting on the remaining green leaves too. Those 'darkened' leaves may not feel dead at the moment, but they very shortly will. If possible, communicate with the supplier by sending a photo of the plant with a complaint, see what they say, but if you keep ...


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The plant looks alive and healthy but there are a few dead branches on it. Rosemary is a native species in hot dry climates. Those branches didn't get to look as dead as that in a few days. IMO they were dead when it was shipped to you. Unless you want to go through the hassle of complaining about it and returning it, I would just snip off the dead ...


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Most Rosemary plants do exhibit phototropism - growth tends to go upwards, but their natural growth habit is gawky, there's nothing neat about a rosemary plant as it gets a little older - you may get woody branches going sideways, even pointing downwards, with fresh growth on them which usually points upwards initially. There is a form 'Miss Jessop's ...


1

Rosemary are shrub-like plants: they tend to growth sideways. I think because they growth relatively slow, "they want" to cover soil as much as possible, to prevent other plant to growth and make shadows. As I saw on various rosemary plants, there is not phototropism in strict sense. If you wait months, you should see that suddenly a new shot will start in ...


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