10

I live in USDA zone 6b (Southeastern Pennsylvania), and Pawpaws are native growers here. Cold shouldn't be an issue in 6b, but winter length may have some effect. They don't do well in really long winters. As for the conditions. Soil: What I've noticed is that these don't like compacted soil at all. Lawns are not best. Even a mowed meadow can have ...


7

Sometimes you can. The winter hardiness zones is an approximation and meant to guide you in which plants to select, however it's broad sweeping. Each area will have microoclimates that are +/- 1 or two full zones depending on circumstances. A south facing slope will be warmer, and so will the ground on the souther face of your house or other building. ...


7

A commercial Ontario grower lists them as hardy to Canadian zone 5 and the USDA site shows it growing as far north as Hudson Bay. It will be hardy in your area and will do best in: moist to wet soils probably best naturalized near water all types of sun exposure but full sun will need adequate access to moisture likely better with protection from wind


6

Opuntia humifusa pads are edible. Here are a few of the pages that name O. humfusa as edible: ozarkedgewildflowers.com chicagonow.com www.ebay.com (um) everwilde.com learn2grow.com And the list goes on. Of course, it is possible for some people to have reactions to foods others are fine with. If you often have allergic reactions to things, I'd be ...


6

First, a word on how USDA Hardiness Zones are determined. USDA Hardiness Zones are based on the Average Annual Extreme Minimum Temperature. So, the average of the coldest temperature on the coldest night, that's where we're looking at. If you're thinking that's around -3.5 to -5 C that likely puts you in Zone 9a according to this map The shelter is adequate ...


6

Yes, you can, provided you have a warm and sunny spot - like where tomatoes would be happy. Currently there are ongoing promising studies from the University of Hohenheim regarding commercial production in warmer regions of Germany, but many hobby gardeners report good success in home gardens. Yes, the plants rarely bloom and stay smaller than in their ...


6

I'm also in zone 6A (Massachusetts, USA), and have something that works perfectly for me. It is vinca, also called periwinkle. I think mine is vinca minor, but there are a number of varieties, so it might be something else in the same family. As for your criteria: It thrives well in all levels of sun. Some references say it needs mostly shade, but mine ...


5

Lowbush AKA "wild" blueberries. Vaccinium angustifolium Lignonberries Vaccinium vitis-idaea Otherwise, 3-6 inches of pine needles and don't worry about growing much of anything (though I find that daffodils and fringed bleeding hearts get along fine despite the blueberry-centric acid level. I guess the FBH could be seen as a ground-cover, sort-of) I had ...


5

I don't see why you couldn't. Where I live, it's USDA zone 8a and my parents always grew them. I never thought of them as rare but few people knew what they were. I'd say they're more akin in flavour to the long English cucumbers but a little juicier. Their skin is nicely thin so no peeling is needed. The tiny spines on the skin are soft and can be rubbed ...


5

Growing plants in different climate zones can be a challenge. For people in warm climates. The first thing you need to do is make a plan. And research the climate your plant grows in likes. At our greenhouse, we use an aquarium and pump ice water through a trough that allows the plants we are growing to have the correct root temperatures.


4

The Ilex vomitoria is known as the Yaupon holly is native to North America from New York State to Florida and west to Texas. It was introduced to cultivation in 1700 and has many cultivars: dwarf, weeping, yellow berries. It normally grows in USDA zones 7 to 10 up to 20' (~6M) tall and can be used for screens, hedges, specimens and mass plantings. The key ...


4

Edible Tree Crop Farm was Dick Robert's pioneering permaculture site in Nelson, NZ before the term existed. A sub tropical climate was created with the use of North (equatorial) facing hillsides, ponds for thermal mass and heat reflection, wind breaks to divert cold winds, rocks etc. A description of micro climates can also be found here. https://...


4

Plant them behind the north face of a fence, shed or your home. Although the USDA zones are generally accurate, there are micro-zones all over the place that can be as much as one or even two whole zones warmer or colder. You may not get as deep a cold as actually being a full zone north, but the average winter temp of the north face of your house and it's ...


3

Red Twig Dogwood, depending on how much light. They can make a thicket.


3

Crosne is hardy in zones 4 (−34.4 °C, −30 °F) - 8 (−12.2 °C, 10 °F). It will grow in a variety of soil conditions, including sandy, loamy or even heavy clay. A pH of 6.5 to 7.5 is recommended. The most important consideration is that the soil needs to be quite moist, but well-draining, so the tuber (root system) isn't sitting in stagnant water. It will grow ...


3

What might happen is no or very poor fruit production - many fruiting plants need a cold spell to trigger fruiting later on, so growing them in higher zones where it doesn't get cold enough often means they simply don't produce.


3

Just looking at weatherunderground for your location, it shows the temps for your city dipping down into the mid 30's early this January, and even colder temps last January. It may not happen often that the temps drop that low, but the hardiness zone is accounting for the worst case scenario. That said, hardiness zones really only tell you about your ...


3

You're on the cusp of being able to overwinter some varieties of Elephant Ear, Colocasia. I found what you did, that of the very cold hardy varieties, zone 7 is pretty much the lowest advertised. However, there is one variety that keeps coming up as being hardy enough for you. As Tim said, it's the Colocasia 'Pink China'. A number of nursery catalogs and ...


3

Escoce's advice is great. I'll just add that hops produce best if they have a chill period of 30-90 days. If you find that they aren't producing well even after planing on the north side of your fence, you could try banking ice around the base of the plant daily for a month. This is a trick that can successfully trick a lilac into blooming in zone 10 and ...


3

Does best in full or part sun, slightly acidic soil (though as a weed it can handle neutral or slightly basic with little issues). Zone is N/A as it's an annual but wait for temp to be >55F before taking outside. Chenopodium giganteum has no medicinal purposes, but it's decently nutritious.


2

Zones 7b - 9, acidic soil, be sure to have both sexes.


2

American beautyberry is actually Callicarpa Americana; it's an ornamental plant rather than an edible one. The berries have been used to treat colic, in the form of tea, so I guess, if you suffer from colic, you might find it useful. Deciduous shrub, usually around six to nine feet tall, depending on conditions and whether it's pruned regularly, bright ...


2

Based on the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map you are very close to the critical temperature for Black Bamboo. It suggests an average annual low of 0 to -5. The resources I can find say it can't handle much below 5 degrees. Above 5 it's fine, below -5 it's probably dead. In between you get varying degrees of cold stress that won't quite kill it, but will likely ...


2

The problem is its in a pot, which makes it much more vulnerable to cold in the winter. If you insulate the pot well, you might get it to survive, but if it gets cold enough for the whole pot to freeze solid, then it'll die, and in your Zone, it just might get cold enough. Stacking bales of hay round a pot won't be an attractive sight all winter, but it ...


2

The Pink China Elephant Ear is supposed to be hardy to zone 6. I have not grown it myself though.


2

USDA zones are reviewed from time to time, but the fact you're zoned as 9b should mean that, historically (I don't know how far back you went) it was possible for temperatures to drop that low. The point of zoning is knowing what the temperature you're likely to encounter in any given area will be, in particular, the coldest. There is, though, a problem with ...


2

Because the USA is a large country, there is a wide variation in weather and particularly average upper and lower temperatures between regions. Therefore, the USDA zone does not only refer to cold hardiness; some plants will not perform properly in too high a zone with its higher temperatures. For example, they may not survive harsh heat in summer, ...


2

Lingonberry, blueberry, and cranberry come to mind. ;^) Checkerberry (wintergreen) too. Give them more light (cut down enough spruce/fir to make some sun on the spot) and fruiting should improve. Or move the plants to the sunny spot. Potatoes actually like a light, acid soil pretty well, though they would probably appreciate more nitrogen than there ...


2

The two common mushrooms that can grown outside, or in greenhouses, are Pleurotus ostreatus and Agaricus bisporus. The former is a primary decomposer that would be grown on straw, and the latter is a secondary decomposer that traditionally is grown in composted horse manure. When grown in greenhouses, Agaricus bisporus is often grown in winter and the heat ...


2

I like the idea of living off the grid, but as you can read from the comments your question is too broad to get one straight answer. However, I can direct you to some info, that might be helpful. Like some people commented already, hardiness zone info is not important for most annual crops. So a vegetable garden can be grown anywhere with fertile soil and ...


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