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Chilis are best harvested before they have fully ripened. Else, the mush could destroy the entire plant. As for storage purposes, simply use an everyday container like a glass jar or plastic box that you find in your kitchen and ensure it is airtight and moisture-free. I heard that some people actually wrap their chilis in newspaper to absorb the moisture ...


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Many chili pepper varieties will get stress cracks to let you know that they are done growing even if their color hasn't changed. Flaming jade serranos will turn red in a few days in a paper bag. Jalafuego jalapenos usually need to start turning color on plant before finishing in bag. Habaneros and tomatoes produce a lot of ethylene(gas given off during ...


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When the habanero gets soak with water sitting in a pot it cannot absorb oxygen from the roots and excess water suffocates it. This is what I did to save my hananero get it off the ground and raise it up, make sure the drain holes are not clogged, apply a 1:1 of hydrogen peroxide and water solution directly to the soil and do not let the solution touch the ...


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It also looks like this is planted in a plastic tub. Does it have drainage holes? If not, you should repot it into something more appropriate with drainage holes. No drainage will definitely contribute to water problems.


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I do no know if it over-watered. But if you are not sure, I really think it is one of the problems. They likes dry places. More dry more spicy, and the chilies have not so much water as tomatoes (same family). Do no worry, it will not die, if it will not have water for one week or so (depending on your climate), and you will clearly see if it asks you for ...


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Completely normal, sweetie!! The colors change as they ripen into the dark reds.


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I have found that spreading the fruits out on a cookie sheet and chill to 40 °F +/-, before bagging to freeze. Product comes out much less mushy. Mine are just like fresh.


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