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Those sucker shoots can all be usable. You could top them as bush so that they will send out side shoots for berries, or cut all but one to the ground if you want it to grow as a tree. The center, dead shoot can be cut back to the ground. Mulberries need to be in the ground, and not grown in pots. They prefer their roots to spread laterally. Too much ...


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Plumeria is normally taken from good cuttings at least as long and thick as your middle finger. This gives the cutting a lot of stored food in the cutting to survive the month or so as it makes roots, and will be plenty of food to produce leaves at the tip before any roots are formed. When preparing the soil to receive the cutting make sure the soil is moist ...


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Don't over-think it, as long as it has drainage and is watered occasionally , not wet, no fertilizer, it should grow. In Houston area they are sold as a foot or two of bare wood and all the way to a blooming plant in a large tub. I understand , some have success sticking the bare wood in the ground in a shady spot in the garden ; I would put them in a ...


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Note: we have a sister site about biology, if you want more detailed answers you should go there. No, not all plants produce oxygen: you need chlorophyll, so plants that are green. There are few plants which lost chlorophyll, because they found it is easier to parasite other plants (e.g. some genus in Orobanchaceae and in Orchid). They are not so seldom, ...


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Fungi don't produce oxygen; however, because the mycorrhizae of many types of fungi (occurring naturally in the ground) assist other plants such as trees to grow, they do help to produce oxygen that way, but it's their assistance with other, photosynthetic plants' growth rather than a direct role in oxygen production. Essentially, it's the process of ...


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Here's one alternative for you: Yaupon (Ilex vomitoria). It's native to the southeastern US (lowest temperature it should survive at is -17 C). According to this map, Yaupon should survive in most of Germany. The leaves possess up to 0.32 percent caffeine, along with theobromine. Not sure why the species name is "vomitoria"; this could be due to its berries ...


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