5

It depends on what kind of plants you have, but most plants are used to having a night time period. Exceptions are some plants growing in arctic regions. I think for cultivation under lamps, mostly 16 hours light is used for growing phase, and 12 h light to get them in blooming/flowering period (at least this is what hemp home growers do).


4

I would presume that you did them outdoors and that ordinary sunlight would fine during the summer- just don't let them dry out- the problem with mulberries is they don't like to be pruned and the wood needs to be sutured and burnt to stop it bleeding afterwards, I would leave them for quite a while to allow root formation depending what it is you're growing ...


3

It is true that if you plant one seed in a six inch pot and let it emerge then for a while your light is illuminating one small plant in a whole load of brown dirt, and it is easy to conclude that light is being wasted and maybe you need to use a lens to focus the supplementary light directly onto your lonely seedling. Commercial growers take a different ...


3

Bare minimum grow lights are T-5s; fluorescents, each bulb (4 bulbs) gives 54 watts each and uses a good old boring 110 electrical source, a wall plug in (U.S.) Least expensive in my experience. Maybe I've missed something but I have never ever known anyone to use a grow light out of doors on a patio. Your squash needs light. 16 or 18 hours per day. ...


3

They look quite etiolated now, so I'd say the current configuration is not going to give compact, robust growth. If nothing else, lower the lights to within a couple of inches of the seedlings. You can also improve things but surrounding the box with white cardboard or foil or something to reflect the light back to the plants. If these were mine, I'd put ...


3

You have cooked your baby plants! Get rid of the box, if you are growing indoors you do not need a heating mat. You do need thermometers; for soil and for the air. You will need to get a great fan to blow air. Easy to begin again. I would use a 'dome' over your seed starting tray or fashion saran wrap to hold the heat and moisture until your starts show ...


3

I agree with CloneZero. All plants have evolved on this same planet that has specific night and day cycles...even in the arctic. Plants need darkness and a break from the work of photosynthesis. What plants are you growing? Do you know about daylight length and how that affects production of fruit/reproductive growth? Again, what are you growing? ...


3

You don't need light. In fact, it is also frequent to cover seeds with paper, in order to have stronger seedlings. After the cotyledon stage, light is good, but I think that sun is enough (and more powerful then lamps, also in winter). In my opinion the temperature is more important.


2

Moss is one of the most adaptable organisms as far as amount of light, moisture, soil type and location. They are found from the Arctic to the Antarctic and survive extended days of total darkness and almost total light. However the key word is survive. I cannot find any research proving that they need a period of darkness but it has been proven with ...


2

This is a great subject. Forget LED's. Wimpy. The plants care about lumens, your wallet cares about watts. The sun has approximately 1KW per square meter. LED's aren't going to work. So here are some suggestions because we were constrained by budget and this is what we've done Get an 8 bulb (T-5) fixture that takes very little power. No ballast is ...


2

Any light helps. If you're providing assistance to sunlight, you don't have to provide nearly as much help. The cheaper led bulbs aren't as good as a 60w LED with color temp 5000K or 6500K. I have about 150 sq ft indoors. Most of it is grown under regular 5000K LED 40w and 60w bulbs. However, that's a lot of extra light to have glaring in your living ...


2

This light won't help much - if its close to a single plant it might provide benefit, but not for something that is 50cm wide. Also, its shape is wrong for your needs. (You definitely don't want something that low powered with a 120 degree beam on your Window sill, it will waste most of the light by casting it in the wrong direction) As far as safety goes,...


2

No, not for what you plan to grow. There might be enough light just from the sun to germinate and grow tomatoes and peppers but you will not get fruit. You should have without the sun, 20,000 lumens or about 250 watts or 2 1/2 amps to get fruit and get plenty of light, minimum. The other factor is the light you get from the sun is attenuated as it is ...


2

The important factors are the light spectrum and the lumens , not the watts. I have found more information for aquarium light products than garden lights . A metal halide ( not halogen ) with a 5000 C temperature rating would be good but use a lot of power ; available in wattage from 150 to 500 and maybe more.


2

I grow my tomatoes under two 48" shop lights, with no special bulbs (they need the extra light the wider spread of two lights provide). I hang the lights from my basement ceiling with chains, which I raise as the tomatoes grow. As noted in my comments, I repot the seedlings into deeper pots as they grow - generally from normal seed-starting cells into 4" ...


2

This site says you need 50 Watts per square foot of grow area. So, just calculate your required Wattage, and then purchase a grow bulb of the required size.


2

You could bake bread in that box. I use a horticultural heat mat on a timer for 8-10 hours starting at midnight. The ones I use range 24°C-30°C and are thermostatically controlled to adjust with ambient air temperature. Full spectrum LED grow lights, 1200 Watts set 40-60cm over the soil surface, timer as well set 12 hrs. ON beginning at 0600 - as much as an ...


2

That is an interesting question. Shadow is everything that is not in direct sunlight (obviously). So maybe you could measure the amount of light in shadow outside? I would not just give it bright light for a few hours and leave it in darkness the rest of the time. That is not the same as standing in shade. A quick google search tells me, that e.g. in ...


2

If all normal daylight really came from a "point source 93 million miles away", you would see many different things compared with the way they are. For example, the sky during the day would be completely black. Shadows on the ground would also be completely black. At sunrise and sunset, the light level would change from "normal" to "pitch black" in a few ...


1

Commercial hydroponic setups use white plastic on the floor to recycle light for the plants.


1

Adding to stormy's answer and some comments I recommend using a daylight and warm light bulb mixture to ensure the plant is getting the full spectrum of light. Using just daylight or just warm light doesn't offer the whole spectrum of light that the plant needs when growing. You can use grow lights that use red/blue LEDs since those are the two colors plants ...


1

Mikey and Lina. Yes, you can grow a plant, even a succulent with just artificial light, as long as you have have the correct heat, meaning something around 20-25°c (70-80°f) A little higher or lower is fine. The temperature can drop at night, but the temperatures should stay above 10°c (50°f), you have the air circulation, and water. With all those ...


1

My comment's too long So: Basically agree with most of what elPlloLoco says. Here's a little more info: @elPlloLoco: "1000 micromoles" technically that's 1000 microEinsteins; an Einstein being a mole of photons: . No complaint here, it's just one of my favorite units, and I'd like to see it used more. I run my winter growth chamber at about 500 µEinsteins ...


1

Your biggest problem will be soil too warm after sprouting , this will make seedling too tall/leggy. Long ago I grew many plants from seed in Chicago area. Once sprouted , I moved the flats to a garage that was usually 50 to 60 F. I used 48" shop lights with a mix of grolux and white bulbs but I added 2 incandescent sockets to each hood with 60 watt bulbs ( ...


1

You need to get the atmosphere more humid, your atmosphere seems to be too arid. Remember chillis thrive in essentially a sub-tropic climate, they are going to wilt and die if there is not enough moisture around. I have found solutions like these to be a great help in ensuring enough moisture in my chili growths.


1

Yikes do these labels offer opportunities for confusion! I'll address the first 3; the HPS lamp I imagine is characterized by some unit but I don't know which. Here's what the metrics have in common: All are a measure of the 'output' of light. Lumens can be translated to watts: https://clark.com/technology/lightbulbs-watt-to-lumen-conversion-chart/. ...


1

Plants need certain light spectra, typically some from each the red and blue ranges. An incandescent puts out a full range ( typically) , but fluorescent and LED put out specific narrow ranges. One place you can find this information is lighting for aquarium plants. I have moss just like your photo and it thrives on indirect natural light all day . My hunch ...


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