5

Ok, I can finally answer my own question. The reason was that the fabric was closely folded then rolled for the packaging, and when I unrolled the fabric for the permeability test I hadn't seen that I actually poured water on two layers of the fabric stuck together. The permeability is ok with the test on one layer. I feel kind of stupid. Case closed.


3

It sounds like your contractor is proposing using a stump killer if you don't have the stumps and roots bored out. These products are usually not sprayed,but applied directly to the stump; formulations vary, I always use a liquid stumpkiller and apply it to holes or little wells I've drilled into the stump,but there are granular formulations which are ...


2

The flower indicates that this is a mallow, not as I immediately thought a perennial geranium. So, which mallow? I first thought that the plant was a species of Malva—maybe M. pusilla or M. parviflora, but neither the height nor the flower of these two matched your photo. This is actually a good thing because Malvas are non-natives that are generally ...


1

Go with option 2, as long as your contractor is using Triclopyr (commonly sold as a stump and root killer) or a chemical called Garlon II. With either chemical, they should just paint the liquid onto the cut branches as soon as they've finished the cut - in fact, my bottle f triclopyr contains a brush built-in to the cap to make this easier. If triclopyr is ...


1

I did a similar thing using concrete blocks as part of a retaining wall a few years ago. It worked fine once I realized that the blocks absorbed a lot of the water I applied to the plants. Once I switched to plants that tolerated dryer conditions it was lovely and held its own well and the plants grew well. I would recommend using trailing rosemary, ...


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