10

If the greywater is from food preparation, it's fine to use if it doesn't contain salt, oil, or big pieces of food. I'd use a strainer, to get all the pieces. I think the water from the food dehydrator is fine, if it was used only for plant matter, not animal. So no animal, no salt, no oil, and I'd say if you were baking in the kitchen, don't use rinse ...


8

I have some experience watering with grey-water collected directly from our household kitchen sink that I'd like to share. First, I'd like to comment that the bacteria from the grey-water should not be any more of an issue than worm, bird, insect or other feces that are a natural part of the soil content, so long at the fruits/veggies are adequately rinsed ...


7

If you're having a drought, I'd say you'll be fine using it for a short period of time. You mentioned adding salt; this will build up in containers every day you use it, and eventually will harm the plant. Don't use for prolonged periods, and dilute it if possible, as far as possible. Pasta water contains residue full of carbohydrates, so the bacterial ...


7

You only need to be worried about some pathogenic e coli that can be incorporated into plant tissues. And generally these are not found in aquatic environments. The other bacteria, viruses and amoebae can be washed off. In all cases, all are destroyed in cooking. People use fish ( unsure about turtles ) in aquaponics systems where the waste water is ...


6

You can use grey water on the garden, but storing it is not a good idea without strong chemical treatments. It contains bacteria, so if you're going to use it, it needs to be immediate. There are lots of Q & As on this subject on the site already, but more information on why it isn't particularly environmentally friendly to store grey water here http://...


6

I wouldn't recommend it long term but in the short term, it should be fine EXCEPT it's salted. Cook your pasta without salt while there's a drought and then use the water. It doesn't really need salt to cook anyway, usually any kind of sauce you're using on the pasta is salted, so its not essential. If you notice a difference in the pasta, return to using ...


4

Even if you remove all the solids first after washing your dishes as they might attract flies and rodents, you may still have a problem with sodium being added to your soil. So the type of liquid detergent is important. http://ecologycenter.org/factsheets/greywater-cleaning-products/ Household Cleaners / Dish Soap / All Purpose Liquid Cleaner: ...


4

The water won't have huge amounts of nutrients, but will contain a good amount of microbes. You can use it to water your plants, but I see no reason for spraying it on the leaves. It will be a little acidic, but regular (at least every 3-4 years) pH tests will catch any harmful trends long before they become an issue, which they likely won't. About the ...


4

In no order of importance: are small insects or animals going to find inside the pipes to be a nice place to nest or otherwise obstruct? are larger animals or people going to step on/trip/break the pipes? if it is dry for six months of the year wouldn't it be better to store even larger quantities of water? Yet this requires some kind of treatment or the ...


4

I always wash my vegetables before I prepare them. However, many years ago a neighbor gave me tomates watered with washing machine water. I washed it and ate it and got sick as a dog! Seriously, just thinking about it makes me gag still after many years. My very good neighbors just gave me beautiful yellow onions..but they have been watered with grey ...


3

Though Bamboo is correct that graywater storage can become odiferous and messy, that is not the end of the story. There are underground storage systems for graywater and in ground systems that have plant treating the water and so that what you use in the garden is not sludge. Your system just needs to remove nitrogen fast enough before the bacteria get at ...


3

That depends on if you eat vegetables raw, and how paranoid you are. Properly cooked veg should not be a problem. If you are paranoid, just don't put pond water on root vegetables, or cook them well. Turtles can also carry salmonella.


3

If you're like me, and use some vegetable oil in the water to keep the noodles from sticking together, you'll want to be careful not to get it on the plant itself. The oil will heat up in the sun and burn the plant. As for the soil, as long as there is good drainage, I think you should be fine. I might consider not doing so if it's in a container. I'm not ...


2

I had the same problem sometime back; it finally turned out to be that the pump pipe has air sucked in, which creates reverse pressure and so the water could not be drawn/sucked. If your pump is accessible you can follow the steps below to remove the air: Search for a small cylindrical metal cap on the top of your pump. This cap can be opened/closed just ...


2

oil and salt in it might indeed be an issue if you are using just this water and in a container or a place where the drainage is poor. I would not do it personally. Also, the gain is low considering that you will need to make a pot dirty to gather the water and let it cool down, the water you saved is lost when washing that pot...


2

I live in drought-stricken southern California. For years I have been eating avocados from a tree that is only watered by my washing machine, with no problem. Only 1 or 2 of my ornamental plants do not like my other grey water. I try to collect all of my grey water and rarely waste any fresh water on plants except when first establishing them.


1

A study published in PubMed.gov concluded that "Generally the results showed that human urine compared well with urea as a source of N for crops but optimum rates depend on the sensitivity of the crops to soil salinity, which should be monitored where human urine is regularly used for fertilizing crops." There are many communities where urine is regularly ...


1

None at all - human urine is a useful component on compost heaps, and if sprayed on grass, will likely make it grow thicker and greener - but only in limited in amounts,and never in contained plants. Too much uric acid for any plant in a pot, especially the amount and frequency you're talking about. Put some pants on and use the bathroom instead... UPDATE ...


1

Very diluted shower water, or change the soap to soft soap, or perhaps baby soap? although generally not a good idea unless in drought conditions and only done for short periods.


1

I would try a toilet tank system, just without the assembly. Attach the flap stop over a hole in the bottom and use the floating ball on a chain to lift it up when the tank is full. You just would have to support the ball in such a way that the chain doesn't get sucked down the drain, preventing the flap from closing completely when done. Good luck


1

The other answers give good advice, but nobody is mentioning the one fatal error that could be lurking unnoticed: make sure the water has had time to cool before pouring it on. While you might have thought of this, new gardeners might not.


1

Hi all thanks to all of you and your input. My story is I live in Cape Town South Africa and were kind of put in a situation to use Grey water, Iwas very dubiouse about doing it in my Herb Garden ( Letuce Tomato Roket Raddishes and a coupl more it is a small garden so I was cocerned. Buy to my surprise we have had a wonderfull crop and we regrew what we ate....


1

This the first time I used greywater to water my plants. I have a vegetable garden. My father used greywater in the past for his garden and we ate the vegetables from it all summer and we did not get sick. As for the greywater harming the plants, I've never seen plants that look so healthy. Our garden is thriving. The water includes shower, laundry and ...


1

We have watered our tomatoes and runner beans with water from our dishwasher and washing machine, for the last 5 years. The results have been fantastic and no ill effects!


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