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If the grass is brown and didn't show any sign of recovery after a few weeks of watering, it is dead. A lawn that "looks dead" because of lack of rain usually comes back to life within a week, if it gets enough water (i.e. several hours of steady rain, not a few minutes with a hose pipe!) The first task is to train the dog to "go" ...


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Landscaper here. I agree about the boxes and newspaper being bad. You should be able to get away with a 3 inch layer of wood chips or mulch. Here's a calculator to see how much mulch you need. https://www.landscapecalculator.com/calculators/mulch


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I agree with @Tom W. Charles Dowding is a pioneer and great resource for your issue. He has tons of videos on YouTube and books that can easily be found to help you on this topic. My suggestion would be to follow some of his techniques which includes: Cover the area with a weed barrier for 6-8 weeks Lay down several layers of cardboard (as much as you can ...


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Charles Dowding has been writing about no-dig techniques for many years, and suggests cardboard, possibly several layers, for stubborn weeds, followed by a mulch of compost, not wood chip. This remains in place and is planted into, and resembles what the video author is demonstrating. My reason for asking what you intended to do with the ground subsequently ...


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Coming from a dairy farming background as I do and used to dealing with issues such as this - if you want good grass growth, lush, strong and green, then you certainly do not want to do anything to impoverish the soil. The richer the soil the better the grass will like it. To solve your issue the only choice is to spray using a Systemic broad leaf herbicide ...


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If they're growing in grass, just keep mowing, at least once a week- this will prevent them seeding and they will eventually give up, otherwise, the only permanent solution is to dig them out by the roots or use weedkillers. Note that nettles do have some use in the garden - they are a food plant for certain butterfly larvae for instance, so a small patch of ...


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You won't get rid of nettles by making the soil poor. They will grow in the cracks between a brick wall and a concrete driveway! Plowing won't kill them either. The only way to get rid of them is kill the underground rhizomes which survive the winter. Plowing or other cultivation will just chop up the rhizomes and propagate more nettles. Use a selective weed ...


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You'd need enough chips to maintain a 6-8" depth for at least a few weeks. See this post (written by Linda Chalker-Scott, Washington State Extension) for complete instructions. To summarize (in case we ever lose that post): Scalp the lawn by cutting it as short as possible, preferably when it is not actively growing. Cover the lawn with a thick enough ...


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It looks like Liriope spicata to me. It's almost my nap time, otherwise I'd go out and pull some of mine for comparison. It's also called Creeping Lilyturf, a member of the lily family as best I recall. It can be fairly agressive....every year or so I have to pull one or two big piles of it where it's wanting to escape its bed and take over the ...


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