10

This is the Concord grape, which due to some diligent and patient planting and tasting of wild born vitis riperia vines one was discovered that tastes good for tables and juice and was named Concord. This is also the grape that was first used to make "grape flavor" but I think it is now synthesized.


9

You can also prune when it freezes, without problems. I do that regularly under snow and have never had a problem. It is also done regularly in my region. Just: don't prune too much early: wait a few weeks until after the last leaves fall, in order to let the starch to reach the roots. if your region could have a strong freeze (less than -15° C, 5° F), ...


7

Bacterial leaf spot infection. There is no cure, but you can try to avoid it next season. Here are some tips: Cultural: Clean up and burn/landfill fallen leaves/fruit. Don't compost. Loosen the soil around the base of the plant. Add 1" of rich compost to the soil. Mulch well with an organic mulch to help conserve moisture Water whenever the ground is ...


6

Sure, you could put them in as woody material to compost slowly. You could also bundle them and burn. Some folks make baskets with them. Depending what you then do with them that could be either practical or decoration.


6

A side note re. burning them: A small German company (in German, sorry) sells them as charcoal alternative for grilling. The most important information as per their website and newspaper articles: They claim that they are ready for grilling (embers) in only five to ten minutes and supply good heat for about twenty minutes. It is said that the smoke is ...


6

Pruning during winter is just fine. Make sure you use alcohol to clean your bypass pruners (avoid anvil types) before, in between different vines and after you have finished. pruning grapevines


5

I agree, you certainly don't need a formal blueprint to construct a garden trellis. What I'd do on spacing is take the recommended support spacing for hardy kiwi, and use that as your standard since it is likely to be the largest, heaviest vine you will be planting. If you do this, your structure should handle any of the other vines you plan to put on it ...


4

My grapes appear to be thriving and we've had more rain than 90 year old men can remember ever seeing. We're averaging 10 inches per month and in July we received 15 inches. My Pink Reliance and Concords are packed with grapes. The cloudy weather may affect the sweetness of the grapes since sunlight is needed to make sugars. But to ask is it possible to ...


4

Do not give your grapes gallons of water. Think of them like weeds because they're really resilient. Without specialized equipment for measuring the water content (water potentials), you won't know exactly how stressed your vines are. But, you can gauge how vigorously they are growing by looking at the canopy and specifically the the growing ends of the ...


4

I did an experiment last season where I was replacing vines in part of my vineyard, over the course of the growing season (summer). These were vines in pots that had been propagated in my greenhouse, so I did not want to plant them too early in the season out of fear of any late frosts (these were growing vines and not dormant hard-cuttings). Regardless of ...


4

Plant it during the coolest time of the year. That will let the roots get a good start before the warmer temps put stress on the plant. Grape vines - like my muscadine vines - like plenty of water. Also fertilize throughout the year. For a more in depth read, go to www.isons.com and look at their guides for grapes and muscadines.


4

Are you thinking of a tunnel covered with foliage...with gourds hanging down, flowers? I would call this a pergola. Build a wood structure with pressure treated 6X6 posts even 8X8 posts. Horizontals should be just as massive. 2X2's lap jointed together are gorgeous. These make a lattice work for the plants to climb. Stain the wood with a dove-gray ...


4

Ok, here is how I would proceed. Is the middle trunk bent and hardened so badly that it cannot be straightened up again with slow training and patience? If so, then I'd trim the grape vine back to just one main trunk next spring (one of the side branches that is still semi-flexible) and start with that as my main central leader, while selecting three ...


4

If you are patient enough to do it, I think its worth going through with a pair of small hand pruners (Fishers makes a very small pair for indoor floral work) and cutting free the tendrils wrapped around stalks of shrubs and branches. If you DON'T do this, they dry & harden and become more difficult to remove, often cutting into the soft tissue/bark of ...


4

I've experimented with it and unfortunately, even under 'intensive care', the root cuttings weren't a success. I got 1 or 2 plants from all the sections I planted. That, and there's a good chance they will be rootstock plants. Here in the US, Many American grape varieties are grown on there own roots, so if you have American grapes (there are a few species,...


4

The plant is a Euonymus - hard to say which, because parts of it have reverted to plain green, but probably was originally Euonymus japonicus aureum. All branches which are entirely plain green should be removed at the base, from the trunk. Reshape to a size and overall appearance that you want - this plant responds well to pruning, but if you remove a lot ...


4

The rain itself shouldn't be a problem for the grapevines, as they can handle lots of water, and even inundation. Without cold temperatures(25.5 °C at best according to Wikipedia), they require water stress to go dormant, though. The quality of the grapes will probably be very low with little sun and lots of precipitation during the fruiting part of the ...


4

You should fertilize them. If it will not become much more severe, just do it this winter, else you can use additionally some leaf (liquid) fertilizer. It is a frequent problem on new plants, especially if there were in past other plants/herbs.


4

Situation no. 1: If there are 1-year old canes at the base of the plant, cut everything except for one of them (keep the most suitable one to become a new trunk). Situation no. 2: If there are no 1-year old canes at the base of the plant, keep only one trunk from what you have and cut the rest. After that, you have two options: Option A. Cut the branches ...


4

Burning on grape wine is normal, you will find it also in more temperate regions, so in future the outer leaves could act as shading, in case of extreme weather. On small plants, burning is never a good thing, so I would add some shadows, also just some temporary screens. Forget about the "7 hour sun". I have seen many vineyards which cannot get so much ...


3

In the wild, grapes are a canopy vine, meaning the reach the tops of the forest trees for sunlight. I've seen them go up 85', but apparently they can go a lot farther. Of, course, it takes quite some time for them to reach that height. So basically, yes. A grapevine will grow as high as any support you can provide. Here are some good things to note: Grape ...


3

I don't think it'll make much difference - you live in an area where there's good rainfall, which is good for plants in the ground, but plants in containers still need watering, regardless. Marginally, a plant in a pot outside the roof will remain damper in winter than one under the roof, but during the growing season, you will need to water regularly ...


3

You can grow grapes in containers. But the smaller they are, the more time and energy it will take to get them to flourish. Smaller containers mean repotting and root pruning more often. In a large container, say, 4'x4', this will not be necessary on a regular basis. Your 23" containers are rather small, and yearly root pruning will be best in that case. ...


3

Depends on the vine you've already got - many grapevines are grafted onto a basic root stock, that is, not growing on their own roots, which means any root cuttings you take and which grow won't be what's growing already, but will simply be off the rootstock. Vines can be grafted onto different rootstocks for different reasons - some may confer resistance to ...


3

This is perfectly normal for grape and muscadine vines. During dormant season the roots continue to take up water. if you prune or damage a cane before foliage buds out, the water has to go somewhere, so it just drips out. Sometimes it may have a foamy or slimy look. There is nothing wrong with it and you shouldn't do anything to try to stop it.


3

Green means many things to many people. Sustainable has some more specific ideas. Check out the permaculture concept. Ask yourself if your vineyard could continue to do what you do now one hundred years from now without changing the quality of the soil or local ecology. Some more practical implementations: compost clippings and other high nitrogen ...


3

You are correct, they are flea beetles. The black spots are feces, not eggs. The larvae grow on plant roots in the soil. The adults eat a wide variety of plant foliage. They can be an evil pest, and severely stunt plants. However, I've taken care of them in my property and haven't had an issue for years. Here are some tips on control, leaving out covers, as ...


3

Just cut long branches, e.g. to the 7 or eight leaves. This is a usual summer pruning work on commercial vineyards. Only leaves near a grape will help the grape, and the flowers/grapes after the first series (sort dependent, usually after the fourth leaf) will not ripen (and the grapes are usually small).


3

I think they would recovery. Grape vine are very resistant plants, and tend to recover and to rebuild roots and leaves. Really the cultivated grapes already passed few stages where the plants were completely cut several times, leaving only a short wood branch (no roots or leaves). This both for multiply a clone and for grafting (so that all branches have ...


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