11

Nothing to worry about, if you're referring to the semi circular red area on the leaves - these are zonally marked Pelargoniums, and that's what they should look like.


4

It is Geranium maderense, a tender, perennial geranium native to Madeira. It forms this stout trunk and the leaves droop downwards; the leaves are often few and may look tatty when it's in flower. It's usually kept in a pot because it is tender, and therefore easier to move under shelter if you want to over winter it in colder countries. It might benefit ...


4

I pot them and put them in a sunny windowsill or under my grow lights. Either way they're not very happy, and they lose a lot of leaves, but they also give me cheery red flowers all winter, and stay alive until I can put them back out in the spring. Under the grow lights, they get really long-stemmed, and I generally cut off a lot of that growth when I put ...


4

There are several options. The first is the most common in my area. From here, Dig them up before frost, remove the soil, and put them in open paper bags. Then hang them from the rafters in a dry cool (45-50 degrees Fahrenheit) room. Several times during the winter, take them down, soak them in water for a couple hours, and return them to their original ...


4

I only do this for peonies, but I don't see why it wouldn't work for geraniums. Stake around the plot (whatever sort of "garden stake" you typically use should be fine.) Tie string around the perimeter, and for large clumps, criss-cross through the middle as well. For taller plants, it is sometimes helpful to run two or more levels of strings. The strings ...


3

I found this alternate solution that might be easier, less visible, and possibly more attractive. (That is, if your geraniums have not already grown too tall for this to be feasible this year. Of course, then it won't work.) From the link: "This rather poor photo shows how I support a hardy geranium (G. sanguineum) with a simple tunnel of bent wire mesh ...


3

No, there isn't. Most of the evidence you mention is anecdotal, or as you suggest, harks back to the 1920's, apart from the first and the final one you list. The penultimate one is again, anecdotal, but the writer suggests he is continuing to monitor the effects of geraniol, or at least the amount present in Ivy Geranium leaves, and its efficacy. In truth, ...


2

If you examine the stems of the scented geraniums you will probably find they are covered in fine hairs. There is a tendency to overwater geranium cuttings of all kinds, and the hairs just make the problem worse. A useful technique when dealing with geraniums of all kinds is to take the cuttings, then put them flat on a table and cover with newspaper and ...


2

I wonder if this "Flexible Tie" would work for you. It's really useful! Very bendable, and has a really soft rubber coating that doesn't cut into plant stems. It's almost like a stronger, longer version of a twist tie, and you can re- bend it quite a bit without the inner wire breaking. You could use something a little more rigid for low stakes, and then ...


2

On the assumption you're using the common term 'geranium' for pelargonium, how cold and wet your winters actually are is a big factor in deciding whether you can keep them alive outdoors. If temperatures frequently fall below zero degrees C and stay there night and day for longer than 5 days, the pots will freeze and all will die. Equally, somewhere with ...


1

Most geraniums are considered an annual in areas with winters. I went ahead and assumed your geranium is a Martha Washington because of the few flowers I can see drooping over the edge. I've never saved geraniums but I've heard others saving their roots, which hopefully are still viable in your pot because the rest is toast. I am posting a site that tells ...


1

A few questions to consider; is that soil old, been around awhile in opened bags? Miracle grow potting soil already has fertilizer added. Need to know if any fertilizers have been added any of these soils. Too much fertilizer and too little fertilizer will kill a plant. Old soil will probably have pathogens or insects in it now. That is a risk. Will ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible