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12

A few thoughts that might be germane to your situation. If this is a hard-necked variety of garlic, do you cut the scape (the flower stalk that shoots up) off of it? That will produce a larger bulb - at least that has been my observance of the situation. The theory is that cutting off the scape allows (forces?) the plant to put its energy into bulb ...


12

This is more for gardening SE but as I've been growing garlic for years I'll give you an answer. As it involves the major types and differences it'll be of interest to anyone interested in using garlic. Garlic will not get woody. Bushy herbs like sage get woody, where the growth gets old and inflexible and the leaves don't have good flavor. All you need ...


11

As far as I can tell, there is very little empirical data on garlic and mosquitoes. And all of the studies I have seen show mixed results for ingesting garlic or using garlic as a mosquito repellent. That leaves you with anecdotal evidence, so here's mine. My garlic patch used to be 30 some feet from my deck. A few years ago, I moved it so it is now just ...


11

A few observations from a long-time garlic grower (just harvested today, actually): You may simply have varieties that don't do all that well in your microclimate - I finally gave up on the garlic I had been growing (which was diminishing noticeably over time) and bought some new, known seed (Spanish Roja) a few years back, and also got a seed head from ...


11

You can just buy a clove of garlic from the store. No need to freeze it. Just break apart the cloves and plant them. They will grow indoors but require the much higher light levels that outdoors has. If you do not provide the light levels that usually come with High Pressure Sodium or other indoor hydroponic lighting then their "growth" will be using up ...


9

You don't plant the whole bulb, but split them into cloves, and plant each of the cloves separately. Each clove will develop a new bulb that will be oriented correctly. I doubt it matters if the tapered end of the clove is pointed up or laterally since the stored mass is used to grow the new leaves which then create the new bulb. However, if you plant the ...


7

It matters. Not in the "critical and you won't get garlic" sense, but you will get weird misshapen garlic if they are not base down, tip up. Not my picture, but I've grown these, and it's due to mis-oriented cloves at planting time. Here are some sideways examples:


7

Some people put their garlic in the fridge for about 2 weeks. You aim to get a temperature of about 4 - 6 deg Celcius, so your fridge might not be cold enough. Some people have reported that garlic stored in the freezer sprouts just fine. It may be that they used hard neck varieties which are more suited to the cold since they originated in the cold ...


7

Garlic is grown from cloves and not from seed. You plant individual cloves and these form bulbs. You then save the largest bulbs to plant the cloves the following year. This is because soft neck garlic doesn't usually produce seeds and even if they do, they are not true. That's why it's usually propagated by the planting of cloves from bulbs.


7

Garlic bulb size is determined by multiple factors one of them being the size of the clove that you start with. A larger clove presumably provides more stored nutrients to sustain more vegetative growth which then helps produce larger bulbs. So, many people will save the larger cloves for seed, and eat the smaller ones. Nevertheless, even if they are small,...


7

With regular garlic, you would cut it off at a certain point if you wanted bigger bulbs in the ground, or leave it on if you want bulbils/bulblets to form. FYI: You can eat garlic scapes (they're tasty). Unlike most garlic, leeks produce true seed (so for leeks, you would leave the flower and scape on if you wanted seeds). I've never grown elephant garlic. ...


6

If you have sprouted garlic, don't hesitate to plant it. It's on sale because the culinary value of sprouted garlic is decreased and because it can't be stored longer. The cloves want to grow now. Assuming your farmers market sells locally grown produce, I would assume the breed to match your local climate, so it should do reasonably well in your garden: ...


6

Well it depends on what you want. If you are going to harvest it later on then you probably want to plant them mostly straight up and down. If you aren't harvesting, it'll probably grow just fine and new cloves and divisions will likely to grow straight.


6

One opinion here http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/garlic/save-garlic-next-year.htm Proper storage is also crucial when saving garlic stock for planting. While garlic will keep for a short time at room temperatures of between 68-86 degrees F. (20-30 C.), the bulbs will begin to degrade, soften, and shrivel. For long term storage, garlic should be ...


6

Yes, cold paired with no snow cover is hard on top growth, but garlic cloves will survive the winter in zone 6b (where I am also, incidentally). In my area, it's common for the top growth to die back completely during winter, and come back in the spring.


6

Let the soil dry out a bit before watering. Dig down 1 inch into the soil. If the 1 inch of soil is dry, water it. If the leaves are wilting, or "deflated", it needs water. I mention deflated leaves for onions and garlics because they are round, hollow, and structurally strong, so they may not literally fall over until they are near death from lack of water....


6

Studies show that the size of the final bulb is determined by the size of the clove that is planted. Larger cloves put out bigger leaves which results in greater photosynthesis and more energy for bulb production. If you're serious about growing garlic, it's suggested that you buy local garlic seed aka bulbs as local varieties will be suitable for your ...


6

From my experience garlic doesn't need to be rotated unless there is a particular problem noticed the previous year. I've even heard of farmers growing alliums in the same field for 30 years straight without issue and some even report better yields in established fields. If you want to rotate a classic three year garlic crop rotation is tomato family, ...


6

Here you can see Lily of the Valley (left) and Wild garlic (right) in the same photo. As you can see, Lily of the Valley usually has two leafs, one wrapping the other on the stem, while Wild garlic only has one leaf. Image found at Landleys kök (in Swedish).


5

Would not water every day, you can create problems. You can for one: kill the plant, there would not be any air going to the plants root and would kill of the roots. two: You could grow mold around the plant and on the plant. In the end killing it as well, plus then you would have to toss out the dirt to stop it from spreading.


5

Garlic’s demand for K ranges from 125 to 180 kg K2O/ha (Bertoni and Morard du L. Espagnacq, 1988; Zink, 1963). If you're autumn planting where this is Oct-Nov, then the RHS advises  Apply a general fertiliser, such as Growmore, at planting time at 2oz per sq yd (50g per sq m) followed by a light dressing of 1oz sq yd (25g sq m) of sulphate of potash in ...


5

Garlic is grown from either cloves or bulbils - normally cloves. Bulbils [the small bulbs formed in the "flower" (it's not really a flower) of a hardneck (or "scape-forming") garlic scape] are vegetative clones, the same as cloves, but they are smaller, there are more of them, an they have no soil contact if properly handled - as such, bulbils may be used ...


4

Yes, garlic flowers are delicious. Pull the petals off and use them in your cooking. We generally put them in salads, on steaks, in rice or mashed potatoes.. Etc.


4

That's common with garlic. I don't know if there's anything specifically that causes it but you can just separate or split the leaf that's constricting the growth and it'll be fine.


4

From my research, sort of. The garlic plant itself does not keep bugs away but when you make a paste or spray garlic water onto the plants that acts a lot like the pesticide that can be used. It helps keep them away, which is nice. It can also keep away snakes from above. You can even use this to help keep moles, voles, and ground hogs from getting to the ...


4

I'd start with "consider the source" and leave this stuff at the store. Importing pests to the garden from doubtful seed sources is a learning experience you should not need to go through personally to learn from. Either buy certified, inspected seed (cloves, of course, not actual seeds, but it's referred to as seed garlic in the trade), or get garlic from ...


4

You should plant garlic cloves base down, tip up, and in most places (yes, even with real winters) in the fall. I got mine in very late this year (Boxing day) but I have terrible results from spring planting as compared to fall (or early winter) planting. The base is the part of the clove that was attached to the head. The tip is the pointy end. If you've ...


4

I would not intentionally compost any plant material with a fungal infection. Fungal spores stay dormant in the soil. Good horticultural practice says you'll plant your garlic elsewhere next year, so you'd reduce the risk of transmitting the rust, but you're asking for problems if you spread this material around in a year or two's time in your compost. ...


4

I would avoid planting them in frozen soil. An alternative is to keep them in a cool, dry and DARK place until the spring. If you have a dry basement or garage that stays "cold", that might be perfect, especially if outside temps stay well below freezing all winter. (aim for "40/40" - 40 days below 40 degrees before you plant). You'll have beautiful scapes ...


3

It will grow something. If you'd like to give it a whirl, do that. It won't grow as much as if planted in the fall (personal experience doing it both ways - I have planted well into December on years I've gotten behind, because what I have gotten from spring planted garlic has always been pathetic.) A lot of important root development goes on over the ...


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