8

According to this publication from the University of Wisconsin Extension, the larvae of several destructive insects can grow to maturity in windfallen apples: Apple Maggot Flies (pp. 12, 14) Codling Moth (p. 15) Plum Curculio (p. 16) In all three cases, you should remove all windfalls but not compost them (it's recommended that you bury the apples at least ...


7

Don't overthink this. In the wild, small trees and shrubs get trodden on and/or eaten by animals all the time, and they don't go extinct because of it. They might not look "perfect" after the damage, but they survive. A shrub such as redcurrant usually has several "branches" growing from the roots, so damaging one is not going to be fatal....


5

Good effort with the impromtu repair! Depends quite a bit on the species, but generally, if its clean and bound together properly, it can be suprisingly successful, although it might need continued splinting/ structural support. Sometimes simply proceeding as though doing grafting can be successful. Matching up the nutrient transporting tissue is extremely ...


5

The explanation for the sentence you find confusing is, if you plant a seed from a clementine fruit,it won't come true, meaning any fruit you might get is very unlikely to be a clementine - it may turn out to be a sour orange, or a smaller fruit that is bitter, there's no way of knowing. Be warned that some citrus plants grown from seed may want to get huge, ...


5

Well it's preferable if this doesn't happen, but it's not at all uncommon in the UK these days. Our weather has always been variable, but seems to be a lot more so now; if you recall, August not only gave us a heatwave, but then turned very cool indeed, especially at night, before turning much warmer in the last week or two. This has resulted in your tree ...


4

I grew a Clementine from seed and kept it for at least 12 years. It gave me a single flower in all that time, probably because I didn't keep it cold enough in winter (should be kept at about 50 degrees Fahrenheit). As for height, I intentionally dwarfed it by not repotting it too often - I didn't want to try to carry 50+ pounds of tree in and out of my house ...


3

If your plant doesn't want to flower by itself, you can try to stimulate it with ethylene gas. There are more ways to get this gas, but the easiest way is to use apple pieces and put them close to the rosette. Here are more methods described for ethylene gas production in order to stimulate flowering in Ananas.


3

Soil for citrus trees should be slightly acid, not alkaline, but above all should be well drained. They don't like to have their feet wet, so if there is a risk that when you water the tree the water will sit around and flood the roots then the tree will demonstrate its unhappiness by not growing or shedding leaves. Quite possibly when you moved the tree ...


3

There are a couple of factors to consider: time of bloom and compatibility. For time of bloom we need the male and female flowers open at the same time, or the likelihood of pollen transfer is low. For compatibility the essential factor is that the pollen characteristics cannot be too alike. For a detailed discussion see the PDF by Joseph H Connell "...


3

Here in the UK fallen apples are eaten by several species of birds. Here's a quote from this link: The bumper crop of apples nationwide in 2013, and the fact that they stayed on the trees so late in many instances, seems to have provided a bonanza for native and migrant thrushes. The pictured birds below - Blackbird female, Redwing and Fieldfare - were ...


2

To keep the tree small you need to summer prune. All new growth can that is cut back to one leaf bud or more will still fruit. You can also do scoring. ( you can research that on google)


2

Same happened with us. We got a special fertilizer for citrus and brushed the flowers with a little paint brush not used for anything else and we finally got some. Hope this works for you. It's like being pregnant for 2 or 3 years and not having a baby you are waiting for. So exciting when we FINALLY got fruit. haha


2

This could be a strange version of "biennial bearing" which is a well known fruit tree problem. It can be started by something happening which reduces one year's crop. This results in over-production of flowers the following year which over-stresses the tree, resulting in no crop the following year, and the two-year cycle continues. Maybe one half of the ...


2

You say that the trees are grafted, right? If so, then the trees coming up from below ground level are actually being produced by the rootstock and not the scion. This could be caused by competition between the scion and the invading trees from the forest - and, now, with competition from the rootstock's own offspring. But then, you say one of the "...


2

In the UK, the recommended time for pruning plum trees is April or July, but definitely not at other times because of the risk of silverleaf disease. I'm not sure that is canker, and its definitely not bacterial canker at the moment because there's no sign of dampness or oozing from the area. However, the bark has gone for a reason and that area will be ...


2

Unfortunately your photo doesn’t really show the lower part, but it seems like the growth is not from the grafted top part, but rootstock suckers pushing up. Suckers should usually be removed as soon as possible, because they can “suck” some of the energy that should be going into the crown of the tree otherwise. If my assumption is correct (check where the ...


2

It looks like borer damage. They are difficult to control as they are in the wood. Some can be killed by pushing a wire into the holes if the holes are relatively straight.The tree does not look good.


2

It is disease. What is important to know here (Australia) is whether this is puccinia psidii (Myrtle Rust) because the nursery will have to be informed. official info at https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive-species/diseases-fungi-and-parasites/myrtle-rust Contact details for help in Victoria at: https://agriculture.vic.gov.au/biosecurity/...


2

An "open center" is common for bearing fruit trees; Then you don't have a tall main trunk that is inconvenient to harvest. Generally the lower the branches are, the easier to harvest. If you do not expect to pick fruit ,trim it or not , any style you want.


2

The leaves look like plum to me (but that doesn't guarantee they are plums, it only means there isn't an obvious reason why they are not plums!) They are still very small and look like they might have been grown from seed. They certainly don't look as if they were bought grafted onto a rootstock. If that is correct, they may take up to 6 years from ...


2

I would add Amelanchier alnifolia - quite hardy, good edible fruit (select a variety depending on your requirement). Most often grows to 1–8 m (3–26 ft).


2

Quite likely the roots that are "a bit pulled out of the ground" have been broken and the ends of the roots are still in the ground. The roots on the other side of the tree may have been damaged as well even if they are still underground. All you can do is get it upright again, stake it to prevent more damage until the roots have re-established ...


2

The best time to marcot your mango trees is when they are producing new leaves. I don't think you have a proper spring as such where you are, which is when marcotting would be done in the northern hemisphere, but even so, you may get faster rooting earlier in the year than you will now. However, you will obviously know when your tree is producing new leaves ...


2

Nothing so far as I am aware; biblical fig seems to refer to common fig, Ficus carica, (of which there are several varieties) see here https://ww2.odu.edu/~lmusselm/plant/bible/commonfig.php. Quite why your supplier labelled it 'biblical fig' is a bit of a curiousity, unless that plant is not any particular variety of Ficus carica.


2

If you haven't already considered these: They could be Calamansi. I can't find a good photo of the full tree of this though. They could be Cam sanh (although your ones seem to have a smoother skin).


2

The most likely explanation is drought; you don't say quite when you planted it in the garden, but if it was this year, it would have needed frequent applications of plentiful water from May onwards and any time it was dry and hot. Shrubs and trees need water supplementation at these times for the first two years after planting - after that, most will cope ...


2

Fastest way is to buy plants from a garden shop/nursery. In winter , bare root plants move easily ,are not expensive if you consider the time involved in your listed choices. I estimate I have planted about 50 bare root fruit trees and I don't remember loosing any. And with purchased stock you get choices of many varieties . Depending on where in the world ...


2

At this early stage in the life of a young tree your thoughts are best inclined towards making the tree viable in later life. Say you want to plant it out into an open location in a garden. If you let it grow vertically upwards it will eventually grow inconveniently tall for harvesting fruit. A better choice would be to have it produce four sideshoots (N,S,E,...


1

Getting sunlight through glass windows is filtered light at best.. tropical plants of this nature like lots of direct sun, especially in cooler climates.. consider moving her just outside that glass door, using apple slices may help, but also feed with a blooming and rooting formula (higher phosphate on the NPK rating) something like product in photo but ...


1

Various species and varieties have different typical flowering durations, but there's generally a good amount of similarity. Some cherry trees, eg some mature older variety sweet dark cherries, may sometimes flower quite intensively for over a week, some branches on the same tree flowering predominantly several days apart. And for the same tree, production ...


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