7

Don't overthink this. In the wild, small trees and shrubs get trodden on and/or eaten by animals all the time, and they don't go extinct because of it. They might not look "perfect" after the damage, but they survive. A shrub such as redcurrant usually has several "branches" growing from the roots, so damaging one is not going to be fatal....


5

Good effort with the impromtu repair! Depends quite a bit on the species, but generally, if its clean and bound together properly, it can be suprisingly successful, although it might need continued splinting/ structural support. Sometimes simply proceeding as though doing grafting can be successful. Matching up the nutrient transporting tissue is extremely ...


5

The explanation for the sentence you find confusing is, if you plant a seed from a clementine fruit,it won't come true, meaning any fruit you might get is very unlikely to be a clementine - it may turn out to be a sour orange, or a smaller fruit that is bitter, there's no way of knowing. Be warned that some citrus plants grown from seed may want to get huge, ...


5

Well it's preferable if this doesn't happen, but it's not at all uncommon in the UK these days. Our weather has always been variable, but seems to be a lot more so now; if you recall, August not only gave us a heatwave, but then turned very cool indeed, especially at night, before turning much warmer in the last week or two. This has resulted in your tree ...


4

These sound like trees trained as espaliers, though espaliers usually have several horizontal "layers" to get more fruit with a restricted height so that it can all be picked from ground level. For good results you need to choose suitable varieties, grafted onto suitable root stocks. Note this is not an "instant gratification" technique and it will take a ...


4

I grew a Clementine from seed and kept it for at least 12 years. It gave me a single flower in all that time, probably because I didn't keep it cold enough in winter (should be kept at about 50 degrees Fahrenheit). As for height, I intentionally dwarfed it by not repotting it too often - I didn't want to try to carry 50+ pounds of tree in and out of my house ...


3

Now that I understand your set-up is not abrasive I edited my original answer. Yes, the direction you have your hose wrapped hold moisture right against the tree with not chance to dry. You can use a hose as you did before, just set it up as in the pictures below. Make sure you leave it loose enough that the tree is able to sway some in the wind. Those ...


3

Leaf tip burn like that, when your feeding it hydroponically, Is 99% of the time going to be a nutrient issue. It could also be a ph issue, but its more likely your overfeeding it, causing a nutrient lock. Thats why your also seeing signs of deficiency, even though its over fed. It doesn't matter what line of nutes your using, all companys recommended ...


3

If your plant doesn't want to flower by itself, you can try to stimulate it with ethylene gas. There are more ways to get this gas, but the easiest way is to use apple pieces and put them close to the rosette. Here are more methods described for ethylene gas production in order to stimulate flowering in Ananas.


2

To keep the tree small you need to summer prune. All new growth can that is cut back to one leaf bud or more will still fruit. You can also do scoring. ( you can research that on google)


2

Same happened with us. We got a special fertilizer for citrus and brushed the flowers with a little paint brush not used for anything else and we finally got some. Hope this works for you. It's like being pregnant for 2 or 3 years and not having a baby you are waiting for. So exciting when we FINALLY got fruit. haha


2

I would add Amelanchier alnifolia - quite hardy, good edible fruit (select a variety depending on your requirement). Most often grows to 1–8 m (3–26 ft).


2

Sometimes it is quite difficult to move plants without causing some distress to the balance of the plant by damaging the roots. Ideally the pot will be full of roots so that when the plant is turned out the root ball stays intact and goes right into the perfect hole in the ground and the shock is minimal. More frequently the root ball is loose and it comes ...


2

Those sucker shoots can all be usable. You could top them as bush so that they will send out side shoots for berries, or cut all but one to the ground if you want it to grow as a tree. The center, dead shoot can be cut back to the ground. Mulberries need to be in the ground, and not grown in pots. They prefer their roots to spread laterally. Too much ...


2

The only trees I will ever support with stakes and ties are; bare root trees, mature trees that were moved to another location and trees that were blown over. When one supports a tree it becomes just like your arm or leg that was broken and was put into a cast. Atrophy. Trees especially, NEED to move in the wind. That is what creates a supportive root ...


2

You'd be best off planting them asap, but if the ground's not prepared you obviously can't. Either way, depending where you are in the UK and how bad this winter is, you should get them planted this winter because now is the time to plant bare root rather than waiting till spring, that way they've got time to settle in before it gets dry in spring/summer. ...


2

It is a watering issue. First I will discuss cause, then about way you might be able to save your plant. Both under watering and over watering, have curled leaves when the leaves are completely dead. In the case of under watering the plant dried out. The leaves being the thinnest part of the plant will die the quickest. It would be losing water in two ...


2

This could be a strange version of "biennial bearing" which is a well known fruit tree problem. It can be started by something happening which reduces one year's crop. This results in over-production of flowers the following year which over-stresses the tree, resulting in no crop the following year, and the two-year cycle continues. Maybe one half of the ...


2

You say that the trees are grafted, right? If so, then the trees coming up from below ground level are actually being produced by the rootstock and not the scion. This could be caused by competition between the scion and the invading trees from the forest - and, now, with competition from the rootstock's own offspring. But then, you say one of the "...


2

In the UK, the recommended time for pruning plum trees is April or July, but definitely not at other times because of the risk of silverleaf disease. I'm not sure that is canker, and its definitely not bacterial canker at the moment because there's no sign of dampness or oozing from the area. However, the bark has gone for a reason and that area will be ...


2

It looks like borer damage. They are difficult to control as they are in the wood. Some can be killed by pushing a wire into the holes if the holes are relatively straight.The tree does not look good.


2

You usually graft from an existing, fruit-producing tree onto rootstock. You don't typically graft a seed-grown tree onto another seed-grown tree. Grafting "budwood" from a producing tree onto rootstock provides two benefits: 1) the new tree immediately starts producing fruit, thereby skipping the 3 to 7 year juvenile stage where the tree does not produce ...


2

The leaves look like plum to me (but that doesn't guarantee they are plums, it only means there isn't an obvious reason why they are not plums!) They are still very small and look like they might have been grown from seed. They certainly don't look as if they were bought grafted onto a rootstock. If that is correct, they may take up to 6 years from ...


2

It is disease. What is important to know here (Australia) is whether this is puccinia psidii (Myrtle Rust) because the nursery will have to be informed. official info at https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive-species/diseases-fungi-and-parasites/myrtle-rust Contact details for help in Victoria at: https://agriculture.vic.gov.au/biosecurity/...


2

Quite likely the roots that are "a bit pulled out of the ground" have been broken and the ends of the roots are still in the ground. The roots on the other side of the tree may have been damaged as well even if they are still underground. All you can do is get it upright again, stake it to prevent more damage until the roots have re-established ...


2

The best time to marcot your mango trees is when they are producing new leaves. I don't think you have a proper spring as such where you are, which is when marcotting would be done in the northern hemisphere, but even so, you may get faster rooting earlier in the year than you will now. However, you will obviously know when your tree is producing new leaves ...


2

Nothing so far as I am aware; biblical fig seems to refer to common fig, Ficus carica, (of which there are several varieties) see here https://ww2.odu.edu/~lmusselm/plant/bible/commonfig.php. Quite why your supplier labelled it 'biblical fig' is a bit of a curiousity, unless that plant is not any particular variety of Ficus carica.


1

The only way to find out is to try. Save several seeds and put them in water for a week; change the water daily so they don't go mouldy, and keep them somewhere that isn't cold. After that, plant them into potting soil, spaced apart, water the pot and stand it on a sunny windowsill. Water again only when the surface of the soil feels dry to the touch. ...


1

Similar to other large-pit stone fruits like avocado, mango can get a lot of nutrition from the pit during the first 6 months to a year of its life. Eventually the roots have to take over and look to their soil surroundings. Note that in their blurb Miracle Gro advises that their Tree Shrub soil is "not for use in pots and containers"; look in the product ...


1

First, don't worry about the red bumps on the leaf stems; these are nectaries and they are meant to be there. You may notice ants visiting them because the nectar they produce is meant to attract some beneficial insects as part of the tree's defence against other insect invaders. They are not what is causing the problem with the leaves.Second, your tree is ...


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