5

Use a worm bin (vermicompost) to deal with discarded fruit. Red wrigglers love fruit. You'll need to keep the mix aerobic by adding in coarse compost. Shredded paper can also absorb excess moisture. Your worm castings in several months can go back in your garden for transplanting seedlings.


5

The tree will drop what it can't support. So, it needs sunlight, nutrients, and water to make fruit to surround seeds to make more lemon trees (from its perspective) and will either reduce fruit load to match inputs available, or give up on fruit entirely in the hopes that it can survive to next year and try again. If it's only "several years old" it may ...


4

The likeliest explanation for loss of fruit in this way is actually insufficient water - any fruiting plant, once the fruit is forming, needs extra supplies of water to complete the process, particularly during their first five years. If the water supply is insufficient, the plant will sacrifice its fruit to save itself. Given your Celeste has only been in ...


2

You have a few good options :) Leaving them on turf may cause problems for mowing and as larger fruit decays it may kill the grass directly underneath. If this isn't a problem for you, don't worry about it. I leave many of my fallen crabapples to rot on the ground and the grass near the tree is fine. Composting seems like a great option. To deal with pests ...


2

In the USA pomegranates are grown in the driest parts of California ( and in Arizona ) with commercial cultivation centered in the southern San Joaquin Valley. It prefers low humidity, and long summers. The fruit takes 5-7 months to mature after blooming, and should be picked when it is a deep red hue. When mature it has a metallic ring when tapped. But ...


2

Check to see if it gets enough water and sunlight.


2

Not really, the little balls are unfertilized fruit. From here: The fig fruit is an enclosed inflorescence, sometimes referred to as a syconium, an urn-like structure lined on the inside with the fig's tiny flowers. The unique fig pollination system, involving tiny, highly specific wasps, known as fig wasps that enter via ostiole these sub-closed ...


2

Our apricot tree sounds as though the environment could be a residential setting and The tree bears flowers and then fruits sounds as though this might be an annual occurrence. Hence an alternative to lack of water, from Kristi Waterworth may be of interest: Why Apricot Fruits Fall from Tree Apricot fruit falling off your tree happens because most ...


2

No, just because a tomato doesn't show signs of a pathogen, doesn't mean it is safe to eat. You need to get to the root of the problem first. I would highly recommend you first remove all the bad tomatoes from the plant and toss them. Go here: tomato help This may help in diagnosing your disease. If it's a fungus follow my next point. Second, go get some ...


1

When grown outdoors, mangoes are pollinated via insects and air movement (wind); indoors, none of that takes place, so shaking the plant when the flowers open to try to release the pollen so that it reaches the female flowers increases the chance of fruits forming. Further info here https://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-baby-mangoes-indoors-94188.html


1

There are some regulators, but it seems the effect depends on climate, so not very consistent. And this is done to reduce fruits, so that the plant have larger one, and with more sugar. Maybe it is not what you want. You should ask your local agriculture shop: products and way to use depends on region/climate. But the plants want to produce fruits, so next ...


1

Two things to consider: Plums are mostly insect pollinated; there is some wind pollination and some self-pollination (see this study for example). So if you can prevent insects from visiting, say by draping the tree in a barrier of some sort while the flowers are open then pollination will be hindered and fruit production will decline. Plums make good wine ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible